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      La primera regla del punk (The First Rule of Punk)

      by Celia C. Pérez

      Nov 2019

      Spanish Middle

      There are no shortcuts to surviving your first day at a new school—you can’t fix it with duct tape like you would your Chuck Taylors. On Day One, twelve-year-old Malú inadvertently upsets Posada Middle School’s queen bee, violates the school’s dress code with her punk-rock look, and disappoints her college-professor mom in the process. Her dad, who now lives a thousand miles away, says things will get better as long as she remembers the first rule of punk: be yourself.

      The real Malú loves rock music, skateboarding, zines, and Soyrizo (hold the cilantro, please). And when she assembles a group of like-minded misfits at school and starts a band, Malú finally begins to feel at home. She’ll do anything to preserve this, which includes standing up to an anti-punk school administration to fight for her right to express herself!

      Pet

      by Akwaeke Emezi

      Nov 2019

      Advanced Readers

      There are no monsters anymore, or so the children in the city of Lucille are taught. Jam and her best friend, Redemption, have grown up with this lesson all their life. But when Jam meets Pet, a creature made of horns and colors and claws, who emerges from one of her mother’s paintings and a drop of Jam’s blood, she must reconsider what she’s been told. Pet has come to hunt a monster, and the shadow of something grim lurks in Redemption’s house. Jam must fight not only to protect her best friend, but also to uncover the truth, and the answer to the question—How do you save the world from monsters if no one will admit they exist?

      In their riveting and timely young adult debut, acclaimed novelist Akwaeke Emezi asks difficult questions about what choices you can make when the society around you is in denial.

      Say, Say, Say

      by Lila Savage

      Nov 2019

      Adult Crossover High Plus

      Ella is nearing thirty, and not yet living the life she imagined. Her artistic ambitions as a student in Minnesota have given way to an unintended career in caregiving. One spring, Bryn—a retired carpenter—hires her to help him care for Jill, his wife of many years. A car accident caused a brain injury that has left Jill verbally diminished; she moves about the house like a ghost of her former self, often able to utter, like an incantation, only the words that comprise this novel’s title.
      As Ella is drawn ever deeper into the couple’s household, her presence unwanted but wholly necessary, she is profoundly moved by the tenderness Bryn shows toward the wife he still fiercely loves. Ella is startled by the yearning this awakens in her, one that complicates her feelings for her girlfriend, Alix, and causes her to look at relationships of all kinds—between partners, between employer and employee, and above all between men and women—in new ways.
      Tightly woven, humane and insightful, tracing unflinchingly the most intimate reaches of a young woman’s heart and mind, Say Say Say is a riveting story about what it means to love, in a world where time is always running out.

      We Are Good Citizens

      by Ann Bonwill

      Nov 2019

      Series Nonfiction
      Social Studies Grades K-2

      Kids can be good citizens, too. They have freedoms within the groups they belong to and responsibilities to show they care— with their words and their actions. In We Are Citizens readers will explore what being a good citizen means at home, at school, and in the world. Features include critical-thinking questions; a civics in action feature that encourages kids to put what they’ve learned into practice; a civics checklist; glossary; and more.

      Juliet Takes a Breath

      by Gabby Rivera

      Nov 2019

      Mature Young Adults Plus

      Juliet Milagros Palante is a self-proclaimed closeted Puerto Rican baby dyke from the Bronx. Only, she’s not so closeted anymore. Not after coming out to her family the night before flying to Portland, Oregon to intern with her favorite feminist writer—what’s sure to be a life changing experience. And when Juliet’s coming out crashes and burns, she’s not sure her mom will ever speak to her again.

      But Juliet has a plan—sort of. Her internship with legendary author Harlowe Brisbane, the ultimate authority on feminism, women’s bodies, and other gay-sounding stuff, is sure to help her figure out this whole “Puerto Rican lesbian” thing. Except Harlowe’s white. And not from the Bronx. And she definitely doesn’t have all the answers…

      Smell My Foot!: Chick and Brain

      by Cece Bell

      Nov 2019

      Easy Reading

      ’Maybe your foot smells good.
      Maybe your foot smells great.
      But I will not smell your foot until you say PLEASE. ’


      Meet Chick and Brain. And their friend Spot. Chick likes to follow the rules. Brain might not be as smart as he looks. And Spot just wants to eat lunch.

      In a graphic reader loaded with verbal and visual humor, Cece Bell offers a comical primer on good manners gone awry. Simple, silly, and perfectly suited for its audience, this tale of Chick and Brain’s constant misunderstandings and miscommunications proves once again that Cece Bell is a master at meeting kids where they are.

      Full-color illustrations created with watercolor and ink.

      Weird Little Robots

      by Carolyn Crimi

      Nov 2019

      Intermediate Readers Plus

      Nine-year-old Penny Rose has just moved to a new town, and so far the robots she builds herself are her only company. But with just a bit of magic, everything changes: she becomes best friends with Lark, has the chance to join a secret science club, and discovers that her robots are alive. Penny Rose hardly remembers how lonely she used to feel. But then a fateful misstep forces her to choose between the best friend she’s always hoped for and the club she’s always dreamed of, and in the end it may be her beloved little robots that pay the price. Quirky and wonderful, this illustrated chapter book from Carolyn Crimi and Corinna Luyken shows that making your own space and a true friend in the world is a kind of magic all its own.

      Black-and-white illustrations done in ink, pencil, and gouache.

      Horse and Buggy Paint It Out!

      by Ethan Long

      Nov 2019

      Emergent Readers Plus

      Horse is all set to paint a mural his way, oblivious to Buggy’s suggestions that a bit of planning might be a good idea. But as the Horse knocks over paint cans and sends brushes flying, he relents and accepts some help from Buggy. The hilarious antics and easy-to-read text will put smiles on the faces of fledgling readers.

      Full-color digital illustrations.

      A Place to Land: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Speech That Inspired a Nation

      by Barry Wittenstein

      Nov 2019

      Character Building Elementary

      Martin Luther King, Jr. was once asked if the hardest part of preaching was knowing where to begin. No, he said. The hardest part is knowing where to end. “It’s terrible to be circling up there without a place to land.” Finding this place to land was what Martin Luther King, Jr. struggled with, alongside advisors and fellow speech writers, in the Willard Hotel the night before the March on Washington, where he gave his historic “I Have a Dream” speech. But those famous words were never intended to be heard on that day, not even written down for that day, not even once. Barry Wittenstein teams up with legendary illustrator Jerry Pinkney to tell the story of how, against all odds, Martin found his place to land.

      Author’s note. Illustrator’s note. Information about the Willard Hotel advisors and other March on Washington figures. Sources. Bibliography. Full-color illustrations.

      Scary Stories for Young Foxes

      by Christian McKay Heidicker

      Nov 2019

      Mystery/Adventure Elementary Plus

      When fox kits Mia and Uly are separated from their litters, they quickly learn that the world is a dangerous place filled with monsters. As the young foxes travel across field and forest in search of a home, they’ll face a zombie who hungers for their tender flesh, a witch who wants to wear their skins, a ghost who haunts and hunts them, and so much more.

      Featuring eight interconnected stories and sixteen shockingly cool illustrations, Scary Stories for Young Foxes has the chills of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark and the heart of Pax.

      Black-and-white illustrations.

      His Hideous Heart: 13 of Edgar Allan Poe's Most Unsettling Tales Reimagined

      by Dahlia Adler

      Nov 2019

      Mystery High Plus

      Guilt.
      Regret.
      Love.
      Loss.
      Self-loathing.
      Terror.
      Vengeance.

      Edgar Allan Poe may be a hundred and fifty years beyond this world, but the themes of his beloved works have much in common with modern young adult fiction. Whether the stories are familiar to readers or discovered for the first time, readers will revel in Edgar Allan Poe’s classic tales, and how they’ve been brought to life in thirteen unique and unforgettable ways.

      Introduction. Glossary for “The Murders in the Rue Apartelle, Boracay.” Contributor bios.

      Free Lunch

      by Rex Ogle

      Nov 2019

      Biography Middle Plus

      Free Lunch is the story of Rex Ogle’s first semester in sixth grade. Rex and his baby brother often went hungry, wore secondhand clothes, and were short of school supplies, and Rex was on his school’s free lunch program. Grounded in the immediacy of physical hunger and the humiliation of having to announce it every day in the school lunch line, Rex’s is a compelling story of a more profound hunger—that of a child for his parents’ love and care. Compulsively readable, beautifully crafted, and authentically told with the voice and point of view of a 6th-grade kid, Free Lunch is a remarkable debut by a gifted storyteller.

      Author’s note.
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