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      Normal (Young Readers' Edition)

      by Magdalena Newman

      Jul 2020

      High-Interest Nonfiction Middle Plus

      Normal. Who is to say what this word means? For Magda Newman, it was a goal. She wanted her son Nathaniel to be able to play on the playground, swim at the beach, enjoy the moments his friends took for granted. But Nathaniel’s severe Treacher Collins syndrome—a craniofacial condition—meant that other concerns came first. Could he eat without the aid of a gastrointestinal tube? Could he hear? Would he ever be able to breathe effortlessly? But Nathaniel looks at “normal” from a completely different perspective.

      In this uplifting and humorous memoir that includes black-and-white comic illustrations, mother and son tell the story of his growing up—from facing sixty-seven surgeries before the age of fifteen, to making friends, moving across the country, and persevering through hardships. How they tackle extraordinary circumstances with love and resilience is a true testament to Magda and Nathaniel’s family, and to families everywhere who quietly but courageously persist.

      Alguien como yo: La lucha de una niña indocumentada por alcanzar el sueño americano (Someone Like Me: How One Undocumented Girl Fought for Her American Dream)

      by Julissa Arce

      Jul 2020

      Spanish Middle

      Born in the picturesque town of Taxco, Mexico, Julissa Arce was left behind for months at a time with her two sisters, a nanny, and her grandma while her parents worked tirelessly in America in hopes of building a home and providing a better life for their children. That is, until her parents brought Julissa to Texas to live with them. From then on, Julissa secretly lived as an undocumented immigrant, went on to become a scholarship winner and an honors college graduate, and climbed the ladder to become a vice president at Goldman Sachs.

      This moving, at times heartbreaking, but always inspiring story will show young readers that anything is possible. Julissa’s story provides a deep look into the little-understood world of a new generation of undocumented immigrants in the United States today—kids who live next door, sit next to you in class, or may even be one of your best friends.

      The Eagle Huntress: The True Story of the Girl Who Soared

      by Liz Welch

      Jul 2020

      Biography Middle Plus

      In this compelling memoir, teenaged eagle hunter Aisholpan Nurgaiv tells her own story for the first time, speaking directly with award-winning and New York Times bestselling author Liz Welch (I Will Always Write Back), who traveled to Mongolia for this book. Nurgaiv's story and fresh, sincere voice are not only inspiring but truly magnificent: with the support of her father, she captured and trained her own golden eagle and won the Ölgii eagle festival. She was the only girl to compete in the festival.

      Filled with stunning photographs, The Eagle Huntress is a striking tale of determination—of a girl who defied expectations and achieved what others declared impossible. Aisholpan Nurgaiv's story is both unique and universally relatable: a memoir of survival, empowerment, and the positive impact of one person's triumph.

      Becoming Kid Quixote: A True Story of Belonging in America

      by Sarah Sierra

      Jul 2020

      City Elementary

      I Belong is a memoir narrated by a nine-year-old Mexican American girl who lives in Brooklyn. At her after-school program, Still Waters in a Storm, children discuss and translate the original Spanish text of Don Quixote into English with the program’s founder, Stephen Haff. Using their translations, Sarah and the others write, create, and act out scenes that echo their own life stories and experiences, often focusing on how the government treats their families.

      This stirring memoir includes stories about Sarah’s life as the child of undocumented Mexican immigrants; how she grew from a painfully shy seven-year-old to a confident leader at nine; and her creative/imaginative experiences at Still Waters in a Storm with her beloved teacher.

      Almost American Girl: An Illustrated Memoir

      by Robin Ha

      May 2020

      Biography Middle Plus

      For as long as she can remember, it’s been Robin and her mom against the world. Growing up in the 1990s as the only child of a single mother in Seoul, Korea wasn’t always easy, but it has bonded them fiercely together. So when a vacation to visit friends in Huntsville, Alabama unexpectedly becomes a permanent relocation—following her mother’s announcement that she’s getting married—Robin is devastated. Overnight, her life changes. She is dropped into a new school where she doesn’t understand the language and struggles to keep up. She is completely cut off from her friends at home and has no access to her beloved comics. At home, she doesn’t fit in with her new stepfamily. And worst of all, she is furious with the one person she is closest to—her mother.

      Then one day Robin’s mother enrolls her in a local comic drawing class, which opens the window to a future Robin could never have imagined.

      Almost American Girl is a deeply moving memoir about immigration, belonging, and how art can save a life, from bestselling comic artist Robin Ha.

      A Delayed Life: The True Story of the Librarian of Auschwitz

      by Dita Kraus

      Mar 2020

      Biography High Plus

      Out of stock
      This breathtaking memoir tells the story of Dita Kraus, a Holocaust survivor and the real-life Librarian of Auschwitz.

      Dita Kraus grew up in Prague in an intellectual, middle-class, Jewish family. She went to school, made Czech and German friends, and never understood herself as different—until the advent of the Holocaust. Torn from her home, Dita was sent to Auschwitz with her family.

      From her time in the Children's Block of Auschwitz to her liberation from the camps and on into her adulthood, Dita's powerful memoir sheds light on an incredible life—one that is delayed no longer

      Black-and-white photographs.

      Guts

      by Raina Telgemeier

      Mar 2020

      Graphic Novels Elementary Plus

      Raina wakes up one night with a terrible upset stomach. Her mom has one, too, so it's probably just a bug. Raina eventually returns to school, where she's dealing with the usual highs and lows: friends, not-friends, and classmates who think the school year is just one long gross-out session. It soon becomes clear that Raina's tummy trouble isn't going away…and it coincides with her worries about food, school, and changing friendships. What's going on?

      Author’s note. Full-color illustrations.

      Ordinary Hazards: A Memoir

      by Nikki Grimes

      Jan 2020

      Biography High Plus

      Out of stock
      Growing up with a mother suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and a mostly absent father, Nikki Grimes found herself terrorized by babysitters, shunted from foster family to foster family, and preyed upon by her mother's second husband. At the age of six, she poured her pain onto a piece of paper late one night—and discovered the magic of writing. Through subsequent years, her notebooks were her most enduring companions. In this remarkable memoir told in both poetry and prose, Grimes explores her harrowing past, showing how the power of words helped her conquer the hazards—ordinary and extraordinary—of life.

      Author’s note. Black-and-white photographs.

      Life Undercover: Coming of Age in the CIA

      by Amaryllis Fox

      Jan 2020

      Adult Crossover Nonfiction Plus

      Amaryllis Fox was in her last year as an undergraduate at Oxford studying theology and international law when her writing mentor Daniel Pearl was captured and beheaded. Galvanized by this brutality, Fox applied to a master’s program in conflict and terrorism at Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service, where she created an algorithm that predicted, with uncanny certainty, the likelihood of a terrorist cell arising in any village around the world.

      At twenty-one, she was recruited by the CIA. Her first assignment was reading and analyzing hundreds of classified cables a day from foreign governments and synthesizing them into daily briefs for the president. Her next assignment was at the Iraq desk in the Counterterrorism center. At twenty-two, she was fast-tracked into advanced operations training, sent from Langley to “the Farm,” where she lived for six months in a simulated world learning how to use a Glock, how to get out of flexicuffs while locked in the trunk of a car, how to withstand torture, and the best ways to commit suicide in case of captivity. At the end of this training she was deployed as a spy under non-official cover—the most difficult and coveted job in the field as an art dealer specializing in tribal and indigenous art and sent to infiltrate terrorist networks in remote areas of the Middle East and Asia.

      Life Undercover is exhilarating, intimate, fiercely intelligent—an impossible to put down record of an extraordinary life, and of Amaryllis Fox’s astonishing courage and passion.

      No Map, Great Trip: A Young Writer's Road to Page One

      by Paul Fleischman

      Jan 2020

      Nonfiction Middle Plus

      Newbery Medalist Paul Fleischman considers how growing up with a father who was an award-winning author helped to shape and inspire his own career. Paul and Sid Fleischman are the only father-son Newbery pair in history, and life in the Fleischman home was extraordinary. Readers will feel like part of the family in this humorous and aspirational chronicle.

      Part memoir, part travelogue (young Paul travels from California to New Hampshire by himself), part writing book, and part reflection on art and creativity, this inspirational book includes black-and-white photographs, as well as writing tips and prompts just right for budding authors. No Map, Great Trip is a great gift for young writers, language arts teachers, and for fans of Jack Prelutsky’s Pizza, Pigs, and Poetry, and Ralph Fletcher’s A Writer’s Notebook.

      Black-and-white photographs.

      The American Dream?: A Journey on Route 66 Discovering Dinosaur Statues, Muffler Men, and the Perfect Breakfast Burrito

      by Shing Yin Khor

      Dec 2019

      Graphic Novels High Plus

      As a child growing up in Malaysia, Shing Yin Khor had two very different ideas of what “America” meant. The first looked a lot like Hollywood, full of beautiful people and sunlight and freeways. The second looked more like The Grapes of Wrath - a nightmare landscape filled with impoverished people, broken-down cars, barren landscapes, and broken dreams. Those contrasting ideas have stuck with Shing ever since, even now that she lives and works in LA. The American Dream? A Journey on Route 66 is Shing’s attempt to find what she can of both of these Americas on a solo journey (small adventure-dog included) across the entire expanse of that iconic road, beginning in Santa Monica and ending up Chicago. And what begins as a road trip ends up as something more like a pilgrimage in search of an American landscape that seems forever shifting, forever out of place.

      Full-color illustrations.

      Here We Are: American Dreams, American Nightmares

      by Aarti Namdev Shahani

      Dec 2019

      Biography High Plus

      Out of stock
      Who really belongs in America? That question has chased every newcomer and many native-born since the founding of the republic. In this heart-wrenching, vulnerable, and witty memoir, journalist Aarti Shahani digs deep inside herself and her family for an answer—one that she finds in an unlikely place.

      The Shahanis came to Queens—from India, by way of Casablanca—in the 1980s. They were undocumented for a few years, and then, with the arrival of their green cards, they thought they'd made it. This memoir is the story of how they did, and didn't. Here We Are: American Dreams, American Nightmares follows the lives of Aarti, the precocious scholarship kid at one of Manhattan's most elite prep schools, and her dad, the shopkeeper who mistakenly sells watches and calculators to the notorious Cali drug cartel. Together, the two represent the extremes that coexist in our country, even within a single family, and a truth about immigrants that gets lost in the headlines. It isn’t a matter of good or evil; it's complicated.
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