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      The Back Roads to March: The Unsung, Unheralded, and Unknown Heroes of a College Basketball Season

      by John Feinstein

      Jul 2020

      Sports High

      John Feinstein has already taken readers into the inner circles of top college basketball programs in The Legends Club. This time, Feinstein pulls back the curtain on college basketball’s lesser-known Cinderella stories—the smaller programs who no one expects to win, who have no chance of attracting the most coveted high school recruits, who rarely send their players on to the NBA.

      Feinstein follows a handful of players, coaches, and schools who dream, not of winning the NCAA tournament, but of making it past their first or second round games. Every once in a while, one of these coaches or players is plucked from obscurity to continue on to lead a major team or to play professionally, cementing their status in these fiercely passionate fan bases as a legend. These are the gifted players who aren’t handled with kid gloves—they’re hardworking, gritty teammates who practice and party with everyone else.

      With his trademark humor and invaluable connections, John Feinstein reveals the big time programs you’ve never heard of, the bracket busters you didn’t expect to cheer for, and the coaches who inspire them to take their teams to the next level.

      Hidden Valley Road: Inside the Mind of an American Family

      by Robert Kolker

      Jul 2020

      Adult Crossover Nonfiction Plus

      Don and Mimi Galvin seemed to be living the American dream. After World War II, Don’s work with the Air Force brought them to Colorado, where their twelve children perfectly spanned the baby boom: the oldest born in 1945, the youngest in 1965. In those years, there was an established script for a family like the Galvins—aspiration, hard work, upward mobility, domestic harmony—and they worked hard to play their parts. But behind the scenes was a different story: psychological breakdown, sudden shocking violence, hidden abuse. By the mid-1970s, six of the ten Galvin boys, one after another, were diagnosed as schizophrenic. How could all this happen to one family?

      What took place inside the house on Hidden Valley Road was so extraordinary that the Galvins became one of the first families to be studied by the National Institute of Mental Health. Their story offers a shadow history of the science of schizophrenia, from the era of institutionalization, lobotomy, and the schizophrenogenic mother to the search for genetic markers for the disease, always amid profound disagreements about the nature of the illness itself. And unbeknownst to the Galvins, samples of their DNA informed decades of genetic research that continues today, offering paths to treatment, prediction, and even eradication of the disease for future generation.

      Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You

      by Jason Reynolds

      Jul 2020

      Nonfiction High Plus

      This is NOT a history book.

      This is a book about the here and now.

      A book to help us better understand why we are where we are.

      A book about race.


      The construct of race has always been used to gain and keep power, to create dynamics that separate and silence. This remarkable reimagining of Dr. Ibram X. Kendi's National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Beginning reveals the history of racist ideas in America, and inspires hope for an antiracist future. It takes you on a race journey from then to now, shows you why we feel how we feel, and why the poison of racism lingers. It also proves that while racist ideas have always been easy to fabricate and distribute, they can also be discredited.

      Trending: How and Why Stuff Gets Popular

      by Kira Vermod

      Jun 2020

      High-Interest Nonfiction Middle Plus

      Fads and trends: How do they start? Why do they spread? And how deep can their impact be? Although trends might seem trivial, if you dig deeper, you’ll find that our desire to chase the next big thing can have an even bigger impact than expected.

      Established middle-grade author Kira Vermond and cartoonist Clayton Hanmer team up in this fun and accessible nonfiction look at fads. In four short chapters, the book explores what a fad is, how the latest crazes catch on, and what makes us jump on the bandwagon. Finally, it looks at the fascinating and even frightening effects of fads both modern and historic. Who knew the beaver pelt craze in 17th century Europe would change ecosystems, start wars, and disrupt life as people knew it?

      Crows: Genius Birds: Science Comics

      by Kyla Vanderklugt

      Jun 2020

      Nonfiction Middle

      In Science Comics: Crows, you'll learn all about the avian Einsteins that are as smart as some primates and can perform some of the same cognitive feats as human children! Did you know that crows make their own tools, lead complex social lives, and never forget a human face? That's something to crow about!

      Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic—dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty year old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you!

      Powwow: A Celebration through Song and Dance

      by Karen Pheasant-Neganigwane

      Jun 2020

      Nonfiction Middle Plus

      Powwow is a celebration of Indigenous song and dance. It’s a journey through the history of powwow culture in North America, from its origins in colonization, the Indian Act and the Wild West shows of the late 1800s, to the thriving powwow culture of today. As a lifelong competitive powwow dancer, Karen Pheasant-Neganigwane is a guide to the protocols, regalia, songs, dances and even food you can find at powwows from coast to coast, as well as the important role they play in Indigenous culture and reconciliation.

      Most Wanted: The Revolutionary Partnership of John Hancock & Samuel Adams

      by Sarah Jane Marsh

      Jun 2020

      Nonfiction Elementary Plus

      John Hancock and Samuel Adams were an unlikely pair of troublemakers. Hancock was young and dashing. Adams was old and stodgy. But working together, they rallied the people of Boston against the unfair policies of Great Britain and inspired American resistance. And to King George, they became a royal pain. When the British army began marching toward Lexington and Concord, sending Hancock and Adams fleeing into the woods, the two men couldn’t help but worry—this time, had they gone too far?

      Rich with historical detail and primary sources, this spirited tale takes readers through ten years of taxes and tea-tossing, tyranny and town hall meetings. The team behind Thomas Paine and the Dangerous Word reunites for a lively look at the origins of the American Revolution told through the powerful partnership of two legendary founders.

      Cat Tale: The Wild, Weird Battle to Save the Florida Panther

      by Craig Pittman

      Jun 2020

      Adult Crossover Nonfiction Plus

      The Florida panther is the only mountain lion found east of the Mississippi River. The big cats used to roam all over the Southeast, but no more. It wasn't so long ago when a lot of people thought Florida had none left. They were very nearly right. That the panther still exists at all is a miracle—the result of a desperate experiment that led to the most remarkable comeback in the history of the Endangered Species Act. And no one has told the whole story—until now.

      With novelistic detail and an eye for the absurd, Craig Pittman recounts the extraordinary story of the people who brought the panther back from the brink of extinction, the ones who nearly pushed it over the edge, and the cats that were caught in the middle.

      This being Florida, there’s more than a little weirdness, too. Florida's version of Bigfoot, the fabled Skunk Ape, makes an appearance. So does a former alligator wrestler who killed a panther and ate its heart, and a bumbling bow-hunter named “Scuttlebutt.”

      Box: Henry Brown Mails Himself to Freedom

      by Carole Boston Weatherford

      Jun 2020

      Biography Middle Plus

      Henry Brown was put to work as a child and passed down from one generation to the next—as property. When he was an adult, his wife and children were sold away from him out of spite. Henry Brown watched as his family left bound in chains, headed to the deeper South. What more could be taken from him? But then hope—and help—came in the form of the Underground Railroad. Escape!

      In stanzas of six lines each, each line representing one side of a box, celebrated poet Carole Boston Weatherford powerfully narrates Henry Brown’s story of how he came to send himself in a box from slavery to freedom.

      Ostriches: The Superpower Field Guide

      by Rachel Poliquin

      Jun 2020

      Science Nonfiction Elementary Plus

      Meet Eno, an ordinary ostrich living in the Serengeti, a corner of the African savanna. But there's something you should know: Even ordinary ostriches are extraordinary. And that includes Eno.

      I know what you’re thinking. You’re thinking that ostriches are just overgrown chickens with ridiculous necks, skinny legs, and bad attitudes. And you’re right! Believe it or not, that neck helps ostriches run at supersonic speeds. Those skinny legs can kill a lion dead. And these are only a few weapons in Eno's arsenal of super-fierce survival skills—Eno has Colossal Orbs of Telescopic Vision, the Impossible Ever-Flow Lung, the Egg of Wonder, and so many more.

      You’re still not convinced that ostriches are super-powered, are you? Well, you don’t know ostriches yet. But you will.

      Mother Jones and Her Army of Mill Children

      by Jonah Winter

      Jun 2020

      Biography Elementary Plus

      Here’s the inspiring story of the woman who raised her voice and fist to protect kids’ childhoods and futures—and changed America forever.

      Mother Jones is MAD, and she wants you to be MAD TOO, and stand up for what’s right! Told in first-person, New York Times bestelling author Jonah Winter, and acclaimed illustrator Nancy Carpenter, share the incredible story of Mother Jones, an Irish immigrant who was essential in the fight to create child labor laws. Well into her sixties, Mother Jones had finally had enough of children working long hours in dangerous factory jobs, and decided she was going to do something about it. The powerful protests she organized earned her the name “the most dangerous woman in America.” And in the Children’s Crusade of 1903, she lead one hundred boys and girls on a glorious march from Philadelphia right to the front door of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Long Island home.

      Mario y el agujero en el cielo: Cómo un químico salvó nuestro planeta (Mario and the Hole in the Sky: How a Chemist Saved Our Planet)

      by Elizabeth Rusch

      May 2020

      Spanish Elementary

      Mexican American Mario Molina is a modern-day hero who helped solve the ozone crisis of the 1980s. Growing up in Mexico City, Mario was a curious boy who studied hidden worlds through a microscope. As a young man in California, he discovered that CFCs, used in millions of refrigerators and spray cans, were tearing a hole in the earth’s protective ozone layer. Mario knew the world had to be warned—and quickly. Today, Mario is a Nobel laureate and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. His inspiring story gives hope in the fight against global warming.
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