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      The Haunted Lake

      by P. J. Lynch

      Oct 2020

      Easy Reading Plus

      Jacob and his father are the only people who fish Lake Spetzia, which was formed when the river was dammed and their town was flooded. The villagers say the lake is haunted, but Jacob and his father don’t want to leave, because Jacob’s mother is buried in the cemetery below the water. As Jacob grows up, a village girl named Ellen falls in love with him, and he with her. But before they are married, Jacob disappears—lured underwater by the ghosts who inhabit the sunken village.

      Years go by, with Jacob held captive by the watery spirits and Ellen never giving up hope that she will find him, until a fateful night when Jacob sees the light of Ellen’s boat floating above. Can he break free and reach the surface? Masterful illustrations alive with achingly expressive characters and eerie underwater light bring readers into acclaimed creator P.J. Lynch’s rich world of love, loss, and hope.

      Gridiron: Stories from 100 Years of the National Football League

      by Fred Bowen

      Oct 2020

      Sports Elementary Plus

      The National Football League is the most popular sports league in the United States. Its championship game, the Super Bowl, is watched by millions of people every year. But it wasn’t always like this. In the last one hundred years, football has changed from a poorly organized, often overlooked sport to America’s favorite pastime. Here are the stories of that remarkable transformation. The stories of the greatest players, the most successful coaches, the most memorable games—and the amazing plays that made us gasp as we watched them in stadiums and on televisions all over America.

      Discover the league’s scrappy beginnings in an automobile showroom, and early players like Red Grange, the Galloping Ghost. Relive the very first championship game, played indoors after a circus had visited, and famous games like the Ice Bowl. See the NFL at war, and meet some of the remarkable athletes who helped desegregate the league. Learn how the draft came into existence, and about the teams that strove for that almost impossible goal—a perfect season.

      Veteran sportswriter Fred Bowen brings his in-depth knowledge and lively prose to these fascinating stories, and award-winning artist James E. Ransome has created stunning full-page illustrations that bring the sport of football to life like never before.

      The Bird in Me Flies

      by Sara Lundberg

      Jul 2020

      Arts Elementary Plus

      What do you do when it feels impossible to live up to everything expected of you? When the only person who understands you disappears? When you are young and long for something that seems out of reach?

      Berta dreams of being an artist, but as a girl growing up in a small Swedish farming village in the 1920s, she has little hope. She finds solace in nature, and in drawing and shaping birds from clay for her mother, the only person who seems to truly understand her. When her mother succumbs to tuberculosis, Berta feels alone, in despair and even more burdened by all the work on the farm. Can she find the courage to defy her father and the social conventions of her time, and fly free?

      This beautifully illustrated novel in verse, inspired by the paintings, letters and diaries of Swedish artist Berta Hansson (1910-1994), is a universal story of grief, longing and following your dreams.

      All of a Sudden and Forever: Help and Healing after the Oklahoma City Bombing

      by Chris Barton

      Jul 2020

      Character Building Elementary

      On April 19, 1995, a man parked a truck in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. Inside that truck was a bomb. The bomb exploded; people were killed and hurt. But that is not the end of the story. Those who survived began to share their experiences and heal. Near the site of the bomb blast, an American elm tree began to heal as well. It grew new leaves and produced seeds. Renamed the Survivor Tree, it was moved to the grounds of the memorial as a symbol of strength and resilience. The Survivor Tree continues to offer solace to people in Oklahoma City—and to people around the world grappling with tragedy and loss.

      Released to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing, this nonfiction picture book from award-winning author Chris Barton and debut illustrator Nicole Xu commemorates what was lost and offers hope for the future.

      Sharuko: El arqueólogo peruano Julio C. Tello / Sharuko: Peruvian Archaeologist Julio C. Tello

      by Monica Brown

      Jul 2020

      Spanish Elementary

      Growing up in the late 1800s, Julio Tello, an Indigenous boy, spent time exploring the caves and burial grounds in the foothills of the Peruvian Andes. Nothing scared Julio, not even the ancient human skulls he found. His bravery earned him the boyhood nickname Sharuko, which means brave in Quechua, the language of the Native people of Peru.

      At the age of twelve, Julio moved to Lima to continue his education. While in medical school, he discovered an article about the skulls he had found. The skulls had long ago been sent to Lima to be studied by scientists. The article renewed Julio's interest in his ancestry, and he decided to devote his medical skills to the study of Peru's Indigenous history.

      Over his lifetime, Julio Tello made many revolutionary discoveries at archaeological sites around Peru, and he worked to preserve the historical treasures he excavated. He showed that Peru's Indigenous cultures had been established thousands of years ago, disproving the popular belief that Peruvian culture had been introduced more recently from other countries. He fostered pride in his country's Indigenous ancestry, making him a hero to all Peruvians. Because of the brave man once known as Sharuko, people around the world today know of Peru's long history and its living cultural legacy.

      Everest: The Remarkable Story of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay

      by Alexandra Stewart

      May 2020

      Nonfiction Elementary Plus

      On the morning of May 29, 1953, the sun was shining brightly and a gentle breeze was blowing on the highest elevation of the world—and for the first time ever, people were there to witness it. Their names were Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, and they had ascended Everest. This is the breathtaking story of how these two men battled frost-biting temperatures, tumbling ice rocks, powerful winds, and death-defying ridges to reach the top of the world’s highest mountain.

      Combining fresh and contemporary illustrations by Joe Todd-Stanton with Alexandra Stewart’s action-packed text, this unique narrative tells the complete stories of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay—from their births right up through their final days—and the lasting impact they've had on the world.

      Lizzie Demands a Seat!: Elizabeth Jennings Fights for Streetcar Rights

      by Beth Anderson

      Feb 2020

      Nonfiction Elementary Plus

      One hundred years before Rosa Parks took her stand, Elizabeth "Lizzie" Jennings tried to board a streetcar in New York City on her way to church. Though there were plenty of empty seats, she was denied entry, assaulted, and threatened all because of her race—even though New York was a free state at that time. Lizzie decided to fight back. She told her story, took her case to court—where future president Chester Arthur represented her—and won! Her victory was the first recorded in the fight for equal rights on public transportation, and Lizzie's case set a precedent. Author Beth Anderson and acclaimed illustrator E. B. Lewis bring this inspiring, little-known story to life in this captivating nonfiction book.

      Author’s note. Research note. Bibliography. Illustrator’s note. Full-color watercolor illustrations. Black-and-white historical photographs.

      Overground Railroad

      by Lesa Cline-Ransome

      Feb 2020

      Easy Reading Plus

      In poems, illustrated with collage art, a perceptive girl tells the story of her train journey from North Carolina to New York City as part of the Great Migration. Each leg of the trip brings new revelations as scenes out the window of folks working in fields give way to the Delaware River, the curtain that separates the colored car is removed, and glimpses of the freedom and opportunity the family hopes to find come into view.

      Overground Railroad offers a window into a child's experience of the Great Migration from the award-winning creators behind Finding Langston, Before She was Harriet, Benny Goodman & Teddy Wilson, and Just a Lucky So and So.

      Author’s note. Full-color illustrations were created with paper, graphite, paste pencils, and watercolors.

      Nic Bishop Big Cats

      by Nic Bishop

      Dec 2019

      Nonfiction Elementary Plus

      With grace, guile, and unstoppable power, big cats are admired for their speed and strength. Although they are related to house cats, these magnificent creatures are nothing like our pets! With breathtaking full-page images, Sibert Medal-winning photographer Nic Bishop introduces readers to a variety of beautiful and stealthy big cats. The simple, engaging text presents both basic information and captivating details about the appearance, habits, and remarkable abilities of these amazing felines.

      Author’s note. Glossary. Suggestions for further reading. Index. Full-color photographs.

      Child of St Kilda

      by Beth Waters

      Nov 2019

      Multicultural Elementary

      Norman John Gillies was one of the last children ever born on St Kilda, five years before the whole population was evacuated forever to the British mainland. People had lived on these islands for over four thousand years, developing a thriving, tightly-knit society that knew nothing of crime or money, and took care of its weakest members without hesitation. At the mercy of the seasons and the elements, a unique lifestyle evolved, based around resilience, mutual trust, and caring. What was it like to grow up in such harsh conditions? Why and how did this ancient way of life suddenly cease in 1930? Where did the islanders go, and what became of them? And what became of Norman John, child of St Kilda?

      “St Kilda Sketchbook.” Map. Author’s note about visiting St Kilda. Bibliography. Full-color monoprint illustrations.

      Ruby's Hope: A Story of How the Famous "Migrant Mother" Photograph Became the Face of the Great Depression

      by Monica Kulling

      Nov 2019

      Independent Readers Plus

      Dust storms and dismal farming conditions force young Ruby’s family to leave their home in Oklahoma and travel to California to find work. As they move from camp to camp, Ruby sometimes finds it hard to hold on to hope. But on one fateful day, Dorothea Lange arrives with her camera and takes six photographs of the young family. When one of the photographs appears in the newspaper, it opens the country’s eyes to the reality of the migrant workers’ plight and inspires an outpouring of much needed support.

      Bleak yet beautiful illustrations depict this fictionalized story of a key piece of history about hope in the face of hardship, and the family that became a symbol of the Great Depression.

      Author’s note. Bibliography. “How the ‘Migrant Mother’ Came to Be.” Black-and-white historical photographs. Full-color illustrations were drawn with graphite and colored digitally.

      A Place to Land: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Speech That Inspired a Nation

      by Barry Wittenstein

      Nov 2019

      Character Building Elementary

      Out of stock
      Martin Luther King, Jr. was once asked if the hardest part of preaching was knowing where to begin. No, he said. The hardest part is knowing where to end. “It’s terrible to be circling up there without a place to land.” Finding this place to land was what Martin Luther King, Jr. struggled with, alongside advisors and fellow speech writers, in the Willard Hotel the night before the March on Washington, where he gave his historic “I Have a Dream” speech. But those famous words were never intended to be heard on that day, not even written down for that day, not even once. Barry Wittenstein teams up with legendary illustrator Jerry Pinkney to tell the story of how, against all odds, Martin found his place to land.

      Author’s note. Illustrator’s note. Information about the Willard Hotel advisors and other March on Washington figures. Sources. Bibliography. Full-color illustrations.
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