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ALA Youth Media Award Winners 2019

Did you know? JLG-selected authors and illustrators took home 54 awards and honors from the ALA Youth Media Awards this year. Make sure these titles are on your shelves!

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      Dreamers

      by Yuyi Morales

      Feb 2019

      Nonfiction Early Elementary

      In 1994, Yuyi Morales left her home in Xalapa, Mexico and came to the US with her infant son. She left behind nearly everything she owned, but she didn’t come empty-handed.
      She brought her strength, her work, her passion, her hopes and dreams…and her stories. Caldecott Honor artist and six-time Pura Belpré winner Yuyi Morales’s gorgeous picture book Dreamers is about making a home in a new place. Yuyi and her son Kelly’s passage was not easy, and Yuyi spoke no English whatsoever at the time. But together, they found an unexpected, unbelievable place: the public library. There, book by book, they untangled the language of this strange new land, and learned to make their home within it.
      Dreamers is a celebration of what migrantes bring with them when they leave their homes. It’s a story about family. And it’s a story to remind us that we are all dreamers, bringing our own gifts wherever we roam. Beautiful and powerful at any time but given particular urgency as the status of our own Dreamers becomes uncertain, this is a story that is both topical and timeless.
      The lyrical text is complemented by sumptuously detailed illustrations, rich in symbolism. Also included are a brief autobiographical essay about Yuyi’s own experience, a list of books that inspired her (and still do), and a description of the beautiful images, textures, and mementos she used to create this book.
      Author’s note. “Books That Have Inspired Me.” Full-color illustrations created with acrylic paints, pen and ink, and scanned photos.

      Hey, Kiddo

      by Jarrett J. Krosoczka

      Feb 2019

      Graphic Novels High Plus

      In kindergarten, Jarrett Krosoczka's teacher asks him to draw his family, with a mommy and a daddy. But Jarrett's family is much more complicated than that. His mom is an addict, in and out of rehab, and in and out of Jarrett's life. His father is a mystery -- Jarrett doesn't know where to find him, or even what his name is. Jarrett lives with his grandparents -- two very loud, very loving, very opinionated people who had thought they were through with raising children until Jarrett came along.
      Jarrett goes through his childhood trying to make his non-normal life as normal as possible, finding a way to express himself through drawing even as so little is being said to him about what's going on. Only as a teenager can Jarrett begin to piece together the truth of his family, reckoning with his mother and tracking down his father.
      Hey, Kiddo is a profoundly important memoir about growing up in a family grappling with addiction, and finding the art that helps you survive.
      Author's note. Note on the art. Full-color illustrations.

      Spooked!: How a Radio Broadcast and the War of the Worlds Sparked the 1938 Invasion of America

      by Gail Jarrow

      Feb 2019

      Nonfiction Middle Plus

      On October 30, 1938, thousands of Americans heard H. G. Wells's infamous War of the Worlds broadcast and at first panicked, thinking that aliens had invaded Earth. The angry public’s reaction sparked a national discussion about fake news, propaganda, and the role of radio.

      Thank You, Omu!

      by Oge Mora

      Jan 2019

      Read Aloud Plus

      Everyone in the neighborhood dreams of a taste of Omu's delicious stew! One by one, they follow their noses toward the scrumptious scent. And one by one, Omu offers a portion of her meal. Soon the pot is empty. Has she been so generous that she has nothing left for herself?
      Debut author-illustrator Oge Mora brings to life a heartwarming story of sharing and community in colorful cut-paper designs as luscious as Omu's stew, with an extra serving of love. An author's note explains that "Omu" (pronounced AH-moo) means "queen" in the Igbo language of her parents, but growing up, she used it to mean "Grandma." This book was inspired by the strong female role models in Oge Mora's life.
      Author’s note. Full-color illustrations created with acrylic paint, china markers, pastels, patterned paper, and old-book clippings.

      Sweep: The Story of a Girl and Her Monster

      by Jonathan Auxier

      Dec 2018

      Upper Elementary & Junior High Plus

      When eleven-year-old chimney climber Nan Sparrow gets caught in a fire, she is saved by a mysterious creature born from the piece of coal she keeps in her pocket.

      I, Claudia

      by Mary McCoy

      Dec 2018

      Mystery High Plus

      At the Imperial Day Academy, where students such as Claudia are elected to positions of authority over their classmates, school politics isn’t a popularity contest. It’s a cutthroat power struggle. Discussion questions.

      Darius the Great Is Not Okay

      by Adib Khorram

      Nov 2018

      Young Adults

      Afterword with resources. Darius, who’s half Persian, has never fit in at home in Oregon. He’s sure things will be the same in Iran; but then he meets Sohrab and everything changes.

      The Beloved World of Sonia Sotomayor: From the Bronx to the Supreme Court

      by Sonia Sotomayor

      Nov 2018

      Biography Middle Plus

      As a child, Sonia Sotomayor dreamed of becoming a lawyer and a judge—though she'd never met one of either, and none lived in her neighborhood. As she grew up, she didn't let hardships stand in her way. Family tree. Glossary of Spanish words. Brief history of the Supreme Court. Black-and-white photo insert.

      Damsel

      by Elana K. Arnold

      Nov 2018

      Mature Young Adults Plus

      In this dark, powerful fairy tale, the damsel in distress is rescued by her prince, but finds herself in even greater danger once she arrives at his castle.

      When Angels Sing: The Story of Rock Legend Carlos Santana

      by Michael Mahin

      Nov 2018

      Arts Elementary Plus

      Carlos Santana loved to listen to his father play el violín. It was a sound that filled the world with magic and love and feeling and healing—a sound that made angels real. Carlos wanted to make angels real, too. So he started playing music.
      Carlos tried el clarinete and el violín, but there were no angels. Then he picked up la guitarra. He took the soul of the Blues, the brains of Jazz, and the energy of Rock and Roll, and added the slow heat of Afro-Cuban drums and the cilantro-scented sway of the music he’d grown up with in Mexico. There were a lot of bands in San Francisco but none of them sounded like this. Had Carlos finally found the music that would make his angels real?
      Author’s note. Bibliography. Further listening. Full-color illustrations created with acrylic and enamel markers on canvas.

      The Rough Patch

      by Brian Lies

      Nov 2018

      Primary

      Evan—a farmer—and his dog do everything together, from eating ice cream to caring for their showstopping garden where everything grows big and beautiful. One day, the unthinkable happens: Evan’s dog dies. Heartbroken, Evan destroys the garden and everything in it. Soon, the patch fills with weeds, becoming ugly with prickles and thorns, and Evan embraces the chaos and misery. When a twisting pumpkin vine reaches under the fence, he decides to let it grow. It grows and grows and produces an immense pumpkin. Drawn back to the county fair he and his dog visited every year, Evan reconnects with old friends and his pumpkin wins the perfect prize: a new pup to bring home.
      New York Times–bestselling author-illustrator Brian Lies has created a beautiful, accessible, and deeply personal story about friendship, loss, and recovery. Detailed paintings depict the changing seasons and convey great emotion. The Rough Patch is an ideal choice for those experiencing the loss of a pet or a loved one.
      Full-color illustrations created with acrylics, oils, and colored pencils.

      Memphis, Martin, and the Mountaintop: The Sanitation Strike of 1968

      by Alice Faye Duncan

      Oct 2018

      Nonfiction Elementary Plus

      $12.75  $10.00  Member Price
      In February 1968, two African American sanitation workers were killed by unsafe equipment in Memphis, Tennessee. Outraged at the city’s refusal to recognize a labor union that would fight for higher pay and safer working conditions, sanitation workers went on strike. The strike lasted two months, during which Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was called to help with the protests. While his presence was greatly inspiring to the community, this unfortunately would be his last stand for justice. He was assassinated in his Memphis hotel the day after delivering his “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” sermon in Mason Temple Church. Inspired by the memories of a teacher who participated in the strike as a child, author Alice Faye Duncan reveals the story of the Memphis sanitation strike from the perspective of a young girl with a riveting combination of poetry and prose.
      Memphis sanitation strike time line. Museum to visit. Sources. Source notes. Full-color gouache illustrations.
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