This Is My Dollhouse

By: Giselle Potter

The narrator loves to play with her dollhouse, which she made from a cardboard box. It even has an elevator and a rooftop pool. But will her friend Sophie like it? In hers, “everything matches.” Full-color illustrations rendered in watercolor and ink.

ISBN: 9780553521542

JLG Release: Jun 2016


Sensitive Areas: No sensitive areas
Topics: Dollhouses , Imagination , Dolls , Friendship , Homemade toys , Imaginative play , Creativity

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Awards & Honors

The Kirkus Prize 2016 Nominee, Young Readers
ILA Children’s Choices 2017 Reading List
Green Earth Book Award 2017 Longlist, Picture Book

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

This is my dollhouse. It used to be a cardboard box.” As the narrator takes readers on an inspiring tour, her handmade dollhouse will captivate young artists, architects, and miniature enthusiasts. She introduces the eclectic family who lives there and shows how she makes the furniture out of everyday objects. A hole in a small box makes a te This is my dollhouse. It used to be a cardboard box.” As the narrator takes readers on an inspiring tour, her handmade dollhouse will captivate young artists, architects, and miniature enthusiasts. She introduces the eclectic family who lives there and shows how she makes the furniture out of everyday objects. A hole in a small box makes a television with a changeable picture, and cut yarn in a bottle cap makes a plate of noodles. “The rug is a small piece of carpet I cut off the one in my room. (So far, no one has noticed.)” The dolls have a Dixie cup elevator and a bowl for a rooftop pool. Engaging spreads and spot art bring out the dollhouse’s whimsy while also providing a few visual how-tos. In stark contrast, the narrator’s friend’s store-bought dollhouse is “all perfect.” At Sophie’s, the two girls struggle to find a way to play together as Sophie resists any unusual improvisation around her unalterable dollhouse. The narrator becomes shy about her creative impulses and later her own dollhouse, which she hides when Sophie comes over. Ultimately the handmade dollhouse is discovered, and Sophie becomes caught up in its creation and the imaginative play it engages. The illustrations done in watercolor and ink have a folk-art style that honors the spirit of arts and crafts. Those who want to build their own dollhouse will find illustrated ideas from the book with basic instructions and suggestions under the book’s jacket. VERDICT This peek into a handmade miniature world provides an irresistible prompt to create fun and make things out of found objects.—Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library, MA

Horn Book

An unnamed narrator owns a dollhouse that she built with cardboard, creativity, and whatever she could find around the house. The wallpaper is drawn in marker; a ribbon and feather become a flapper’s headband; a cup-and-string becomes an elevator, which goes up to the rooftop pool—a bowl of water. Some of these origin stories make it in An unnamed narrator owns a dollhouse that she built with cardboard, creativity, and whatever she could find around the house. The wallpaper is drawn in marker; a ribbon and feather become a flapper’s headband; a cup-and-string becomes an elevator, which goes up to the rooftop pool—a bowl of water. Some of these origin stories make it into the text, but others must be surmised from the illustrations, which is half the fun. Friend Sophie also has a dollhouse, but hers is storebought, with furniture that’s meant to be furniture and plastic people who all look the same. The narrator is embarrassed to let Sophie see her dolls’ humble abode, but readers and listeners will probably guess which house ultimately proves more interesting and fun to play with. The first-person, present-tense narration captures the voice of an introspective, imaginative child, but it’s in Potter’s characteristic ink-and-watercolor illustrations that the book’s eclectic spirit shines through. Her wide, big-eyed faces are simple, but there are other details to discover throughout— items from the endpapers show up repeatedly and serve different purposes. Much like the dollhouse, the book itself invites exploration: check under the dust jacket for tips on building a cardboard dollhouse of your own. shoshana flax

Book Details

ISBN

9780553521542

First Release

June 2016

Genre

Fic

Dewey Classification

Trim Size

8 1/2" x 11"

Page Count

40

Accelerated Reader

Level 0; Points: 0;

Scholastic Reading Counts

Level 0; Points: 0;

Lexile

Level

Format

Print Book

Edition

Library edition with trade jacket added

Publisher

Schwartz & Wade

Potentially Sensitive Areas

No sensitive areas

Topics

Dollhouses, Imagination, Dolls, Friendship, Homemade toys, Imaginative play, Creativity,

Standard MARC Record

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Cover Art

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