Mirror

By: Jeannie Baker

ISBN: 9780763648480

JLG Release: Mar 2011


Sensitive Areas: None
Topics: Markets , Stories without words , Australia , Morocco, North Africa , Family life

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Awards & Honors

Horn Book Fanfare, Best Books of 2010, Picture Books; Kirkus Reviews 2010 Best Children’s Books; IRA Notable Books for a Global Society 2011; Children’s Book Committee Bank Street College of Education Best Children’s Books of the Year 2011, Today, ages 5-9

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine*, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

In Window (1991) and Home (2004, both Greenwillow), Baker combined a concept, her signature collages, and a wordless format to underscore environmental issues. Mirror illuminates the common humanity beneath the surface of cultural differences. In a clever design, two sets of bound signatures face one another, the gatherings reverse

In Window (1991) and Home (2004, both Greenwillow), Baker combined a concept, her signature collages, and a wordless format to underscore environmental issues. Mirror illuminates the common humanity beneath the surface of cultural differences. In a clever design, two sets of bound signatures face one another, the gatherings reversed from their normal location inside the spine; readers manipulate the two openings simultaneously. In parallel narratives, two boys awaken in the moonlight, accompany their fathers on an errand, and return home. In the story on the left, the destination is a hardware emporium in Sydney, Australia. Materials for an indoor fireplace are purchased and put in a van. The right side occurs in Morocco. Father and son mount a donkey and travel a long distance to sell a hand-woven rug and buy a computer at the market. After a family dinner, they turn it on and the Australians settle onto a fireside carpet matching the one in the other story. The size, shape, and number of the panels in one story are reflected in the other, a choice that assists with comparison. English and Arabic paragraphs introduce the visual narratives. A diagram indicates the right-to-left orientation of the Moroccan story. Baker’s skill in orchestrating fabric, vegetation, clay, and other materials into scenes with the proper scale and convincing depth is a wonder to behold. The author’s notes hint at her purpose and process. A fresh take on a timely and timeless message.—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library.

Horn Book

STAR Two side-by-side wordless stories mirror each other in more ways than one. Pages attached to the front inside cover open to the left and show a boy in Sydney, Australia. On the opposite cover, pages open to the right and follow a boy in rural Morocco. A bilingual introduction notes that the boys’ lives are different but also simi STAR Two side-by-side wordless stories mirror each other in more ways than one. Pages attached to the front inside cover open to the left and show a boy in Sydney, Australia. On the opposite cover, pages open to the right and follow a boy in rural Morocco. A bilingual introduction notes that the boys’ lives are different but also similar, and the nifty comparisons begin on the covers, as each boy looks out a window at the moon; a big city and a remote village, but the same moon. (And two very different animals appear in the pictures—an Australian brushtail possum and a crane in Morocco—but both are known to frequent rooftops.) The stories begin with the families preparing for a father-son outing—one by car to a hardware store, the other by donkey to a marketplace. Baker’s minutely detailed collage art will keep viewers busy searching for comparisons, which are made easier with similar-colored clothing (the fathers in light blue, the baby siblings in yellow, etc.). Scenes that seem starkly different slowly reveal similarities (busy streets versus unpopulated mountains and valleys, yet the squiggly lines of highway resemble the winding path in Morocco); some scenes share unexpected commonalities (at the store in Sydney are a man in a turban and a woman in a headscarf; at the marketplace, people talk on cell phones). Viewers will thrill to see the Moroccan dad selling a carpet (woven by the boy's mother) to a man, while on the facing spread the Australian dad buys that same rug from the same man at a shop called ‘Magic Carpets.’ Magic, indeed.

Book Details

ISBN

9780763648480

First Release

March 2011

Genre

Dewey Classification

E

Trim Size

10 5/8" x 9 13/16"

Page Count

40

Accelerated Reader

Level 0; Points: 0;

Scholastic Reading Counts

Level 0; Points: 0;

Lexile

Level

Format

Print Book

Edition

-

Publisher

Candlewick

Potentially Sensitive Areas

None

Topics

Markets, Stories without words, Australia, Morocco, North Africa, Family life,

Standard MARC Record

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Cover Art

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