Draw!

By: Raúl Colón

In this wordless adventure, a boy uses his artistic talent to transport himself to an African safari, where he encounters a friendly elephant, a hungry gorilla, and even a charging rhino! Author’s note. Full-color illustrations rendered in pen and ink, watercolors, Prismacolor pencils, and lithograph pencils.

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ISBN: 9781442494923

JLG Release: Jan 2015


Sensitive Areas: No sensitive areas
Topics: Drawing , Imagination , Safaris , Animals , Stories without words

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Awards & Honors

Booklist 2014 Top 10 Books for Youth, Arts; SLJ Best Books 2014, Picture Books; PW’s Best Books of 2014, Picture Books; 2015 NCTE Charlotte Huck Award for Outstanding Fiction for Children, Recommended Title; ALA Notable Books for Children 2015, Younger Readers; New York Times 10 Best Illustrated Children’s Books of 2014; Horn Book Fanfare List: Best Books of 2014, Picture Books

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Book List*, The Horn Book Magazine*, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Using watercolor and colored pencils, Colón has created a wordless book (based on his childhood) that speaks volumes. A boy, home for the day perhaps because of an illness, sits on his bed reading a book about Africa. He begins to draw. Five identical, intensely colored pictures of the boy with an easel, art supplie
[STARRED REVIEW]
Using watercolor and colored pencils, Colón has created a wordless book (based on his childhood) that speaks volumes. A boy, home for the day perhaps because of an illness, sits on his bed reading a book about Africa. He begins to draw. Five identical, intensely colored pictures of the boy with an easel, art supplies, and a pit helmet increase in size as readers begin this richly imagined day on a safari. He draws an elephant as an egret watches, and atop the elephant’s back, the boy and bird find a herd of zebras. They pose for him as he sits on a stump. Giraffes thunder by, raising clouds of golden dust. The boy draws them, his body aslant as his eyes follow them. He draws a gorilla, who holds his helmet and shares his sandwich. He draws lions, a water buffalo, and a hippo before sighting a charging rhinoceros. Running with all his might, he barely escapes the rhino. Baboons retrieve his pencils, set up his easel, and draw him. They also eat his sandwiches as the day slides into evening. A spread poignantly captures the parting of boy and elephant. Eyes closed, he lays his head against his friend’s side while the elephant’s trunk gently caresses the boy’s cheek. As six identical paintings decrease in size, the book returns to the boy’s pale room, now strewn with drawings. The final scene shows the boy at school, holding the elephant’s picture front and center. The pleasure the boy takes in making and sharing his art is palpable. Young artists will love this book, as will all children who know the joy of exploring their own imaginations. A must-have for every library.—Mary Jean Smith, formerly at Southside Elementary School, Lebanon, TN

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
A young artist, inspired by his books about African animals, is transported to an imaginary safari in this dreamy wordless book. Armed only with his pencil, sketch pad, and easel, this budding Leonardo finds his models in the African landscape—an elephant, zebras, giraffes, lions, gorillas (one of whom snatches the
[STARRED REVIEW]
A young artist, inspired by his books about African animals, is transported to an imaginary safari in this dreamy wordless book. Armed only with his pencil, sketch pad, and easel, this budding Leonardo finds his models in the African landscape—an elephant, zebras, giraffes, lions, gorillas (one of whom snatches the boy’s pith helmet and lunch)—and all willing to pose. He has some adventures—a rhino charges him but is quickly placated when the boy shows it (from the safe distance of a tree branch) the portrait he drew. Then a group of baboons take the boy’s drawing implements and turn the tables by sketching him (and it’s not a terribly flattering portrait!). Ultimately he ends up back in his own bedroom, surrounded by the books that inspired him and the sketches we saw him make on his safari. The story line is engaging and easy to follow, and, while it’s whimsical, the majesty of the animals comes through in both the boy’s sketches and the main illustrations. Colón’s pen-and-ink, watercolor, colored-pencil, and lithograph pencil pictures are nicely textured and tinged with golden hues. A final illustration shows the boy sharing his artwork in a class presentation; an appended author’s note describes Colón’s “aha moment” for the book. kathleen t. horning

Book Details

ISBN

9781442494923

First Release

January 2015

Genre

Fic

Dewey Classification

E

Trim Size

8 1/2" x 11"

Page Count

40

Accelerated Reader

Level 0; Points: 0;

Scholastic Reading Counts

Level 0; Points: 0;

Lexile

Level NP

Format

Print Book

Edition

Hardcover edition

Publisher

Paula Wiseman

Potentially Sensitive Areas

No sensitive areas

Topics

Drawing, Imagination, Safaris, Animals, Stories without words,

Standard MARC Record

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Cover Art

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