I Don’t Like Koala

By: Sean Ferrell

Adam does not like Koala. He tries putting Koala away—far away. He tries taking Koala on a long, long walk. Nothing works. Will Adam ever be rid of Koala? Full-color illustrations were rendered in pencil and colored digitally.

ISBN: 9781481400688

JLG Release: Apr 2015


Sensitive Areas: No sensitive areas
Topics: Toys , Koalas , Stuffed animals , Having a change of heart

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Awards & Honors

Booklist Best Picture Books of 2015
Booklist Editor’s Choice 2015, Fiction
2016 CCBC Choices–Picture Books for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Booklist*, The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

When Adam opens a striped gift box and discovers a plush koala bear, he takes an immediate dislike to the stuffed animal. Koala is “the most terrible terrible.” Everything is terrible about the toy, especially its eyes, which “follow Adam everywhere.” The young boy’s parents, who do not understand his aversion, urge hi When Adam opens a striped gift box and discovers a plush koala bear, he takes an immediate dislike to the stuffed animal. Koala is “the most terrible terrible.” Everything is terrible about the toy, especially its eyes, which “follow Adam everywhere.” The young boy’s parents, who do not understand his aversion, urge him to take good care of the toy. Nevertheless, Adam tries to get rid of Koala. Stuffing it into his backpack, he sets out on an imaginary journey and leaves Koala behind in a grove of trees. To his chagrin, the dreaded toy is waiting for him in the living room when he returns home. At bedtime, the little boy suddenly has a change of heart when he realizes that Koala’s watching eyes will keep him safe from monsters in the dark. Concise illustrations stand out beside adroitly placed text, leaving plenty of white space on most pages. The fuzzy koala bear does look a bit menacing with its staring yellow eyes, and Adam’s expressive face perfectly portrays his doubts and frustration. The cinematic quality of the digitally colored pencil drawings add drama to the little boy’s dilemma. VERDICT This clever title will pair nicely with Anika Denise’s Bella and Stella Come Home (Philomel, 2010), another story about the comforting friendship of a trusty stuffed animal.—Linda L. Walkins, Saint Joseph Preparatory High

Horn Book

Picture this front-matter illustration: a boxed gift neatly tied up with red ribbon. An eager little boy with arms outstretched. It’s a perfect Kodak (ahem, make that smart-phone) moment. But when the lid comes off the gift box, revealing a plush toy koala, all the white space between the boy, Adam, and the stuffed animal speaks volumes. With Picture this front-matter illustration: a boxed gift neatly tied up with red ribbon. An eager little boy with arms outstretched. It’s a perfect Kodak (ahem, make that smart-phone) moment. But when the lid comes off the gift box, revealing a plush toy koala, all the white space between the boy, Adam, and the stuffed animal speaks volumes. With a page turn, readers meet Koala, up close and personal. His piercing yellow eyes are uncanny, especially the left one, with its squished oblong shape and pupil eerily askew. Even worse, those eyes seem to follow Adam everywhere. His parents just don’t get it, so he takes matters into his own hands, stowing Koala away each night: in a pot, on top of the refrigerator, in a laundry basket—anywhere but with him. Santoso’s double-page spread of different hiding places—all with Koala poking out in floppy slapstick poses—is sure to leave readers giggling. Adam, on the other hand, isn’t laughing when he repeatedly finds Koala back in his bed, “closer than close.” Ferrell’s writing is lean and funny, and he wraps things up with a didn’t-see-that-coming twist. Santoso’s pencil drawings, colored with a muted digital palette, are finely textured, with clever, memorable details—including, of course, Koala’s creepy eyes. tanya d. auger

The Horn Book Guide Review:
Plush toy Koala’s uncanny yellow eyes seem to follow Adam everywhere. So Adam stows Koala away each night: in a pot, on top of the refrigerator, in a laundry basket. But he repeatedly finds Koala in his bed, “closer than close.” Ferrell’s lean, funny writing wraps things up with a didn’t-see-that-coming twist. Pencil drawings in a muted digital palette contain clever, memorable details.

Book Details

ISBN

9781481400688

First Release

April 2015

Genre

Fic

Dewey Classification

E

Trim Size

9 1/4 x 9"

Page Count

40

Accelerated Reader

Level 1.8; Points: 0.5;

Scholastic Reading Counts

Level 0; Points: 0;

Lexile

Level AD450L

Format

Print Book

Edition

Hardcover edition

Publisher

Atheneum

Potentially Sensitive Areas

No sensitive areas

Topics

Toys, Koalas, Stuffed animals, Having a change of heart,

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Cover Art

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