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Orange for the Sunsets



by
Tina Athaide

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
HarperCollins
Imprint
Katherine Tegen
ISBN
9780062795298

Awards and Honors
2020 Silver Birch Award Fiction Nominee
Kirkus Best Books - 2019
CPL Best Books - 2019
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Discrimination: Reference/Discussion, Violence: Mild Violence, Violence: Mild Violence
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Twelve-year-old Asha and her best friend, Yesofu, never cared about the differences between them: Indian. African. Girl. Boy. Short. Tall. But when Ugandan President Idi Amin announces that Indians have ninety days to leave the country, suddenly those differences are the only things that people in Entebbe can see—not the shared afterschool samosas or Asha cheering for Yesofu at every cricket game. Determined for her life to stay the same, Asha clings to her world tighter than ever before. But Yesofu is torn, pulled between his friends, his family, and a promise that could bring his dreams of university within reach. Now, as neighbors leave and soldiers line the streets, the two friends find that nothing seems sure—not even their friendship. And with only days before the deadline, Asha and Yesofu must decide if the bravest thing of all might be to let each other go.

“90 Days in History.” Author’s note with black-and-white photographs. Bibliography. Additional

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Discrimination: Reference/Discussion, Violence: Mild Violence, Violence: Mild Violence

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

336

Trim Size

8 1/4" x 5 1/2"

Dewey

F

AR

4.1: points 7

Lexile

600L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

11

JLG Release

Aug 2019

Book Genres


Topics

Idi Amin (1925–2003). Friendship. Social classes. Ethnic relations. East Indians in Uganda. Family life. Forced migration. Ugandan history. Expulsion of Asians from Uganda (1972). Africa.

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Publishers Weekly*, The Horn Book Magazine, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews*

Horn Book

Part of Ugandan President Idi Amin’s Africanization policy included ordering Indian residents to leave Uganda within ninety days. Brought to the country in 1895 as laborers, Indians eventually became a privileged class, to the resentment of some native Ugandans. The story of twelve-year-old best friends Asha and Yesofu takes place during the expulsion period in 1972. Asha’s family is wealthy, educated, and Indian. Yesofu’s family is poor, uneducated, and black. While Asha doesn’t see the distinction (“We’re Ugandans. Just like you”), Yesofu can’t ignore their differences. Asha receives superior medical care; Yesofu is prohibited from entering certain places. Author Athaide (who was born in Uganda of Indian descent) probes questions of nationalism, poverty, and privilege in original and compelling ways. The novel examines how institutions built on the oppression of a native population can change a culture, and it asks: who is African? Eschewing a saccharine conclusion of reconciliation, Athaide explores Asha’s recognition that some differences cannot be easily bridged. Anchored in historical research and autobiographical remembrance, with additional context provided by an author’s note, childhood photographs, a timeline, and additional resources, this is a heartbreaking and resonant tale.

Praise & Reviews

Horn Book

Part of Ugandan President Idi Amin’s Africanization policy included ordering Indian residents to leave Uganda within ninety days. Brought to the country in 1895 as laborers, Indians eventually became a privileged class, to the resentment of some native Ugandans. The story of twelve-year-old best friends Asha and Yesofu takes place during the expulsion period in 1972. Asha’s family is wealthy, educated, and Indian. Yesofu’s family is poor, uneducated, and black. While Asha doesn’t see the distinction (“We’re Ugandans. Just like you”), Yesofu can’t ignore their differences. Asha receives superior medical care; Yesofu is prohibited from entering certain places. Author Athaide (who was born in Uganda of Indian descent) probes questions of nationalism, poverty, and privilege in original and compelling ways. The novel examines how institutions built on the oppression of a native population can change a culture, and it asks: who is African? Eschewing a saccharine conclusion of reconciliation, Athaide explores Asha’s recognition that some differences cannot be easily bridged. Anchored in historical research and autobiographical remembrance, with additional context provided by an author’s note, childhood photographs, a timeline, and additional resources, this is a heartbreaking and resonant tale.

Grades 5-8
Realistic Fiction Middle Plus
For Grades 5-8

Stories with strong, relatable characters that portray believable contemporary or historical real-life experiences.

14 books per Year
$235.90 per Year
Interests
Chapter Books/Novels,Diversity,Fiction,History,Realistic Fiction
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Grades 5-8
Realistic Fiction Middle Plus
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$235.90 per Year

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