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Ancestor Approved: Intertribal Stories for Kids



by
Cynthia Leitich Smith

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Heartdrum
Imprint
Print
ISBN
9780062869944
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Discrimination: Racial Insensitivity/Racism , Language: Mild Language , Language: Infrequent Use
$16.85
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Featuring the voices of new and veteran Native writers, and edited by best-selling author Cynthia Leitich Smith, this collection of intersecting stories set at the same powwow bursts with hope, joy, resilience, the strength of community, and Native pride. Each story can be read individually, but read as a whole, the stories play off one another and intersect, providing a cohesive story.

Native families from Nations across the continent gather at the Dance for Mother Earth Powwow in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

In a high school gym full of color and song, people dance, sell beadwork and books, and celebrate friendship and heritage. Young protagonists will meet relatives from faraway, shadowy spirits, and sometimes one another (plus one scrappy rez dog).

They are the heroes of their own stories.

Featuring stories and poems by: Joseph Bruchac, Art Coulson, Christine Day, Eric Gansworth, Carole Lindstrom, Dawn Quigley, Rebecca Roanhorse, David A. Robertson, Andrea L. Rogers, Kim Rogers, Cynthia Leitich Smith, Monique Gray Smith, Traci Sorell, Tim Tingle, Erika T. Wurth, and Brian Young.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Discrimination: Racial Insensitivity/Racism , Language: Mild Language , Language: Infrequent Use

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

320

Trim Size

8 3/10" x 5 1/2"

Dewey

F

AR

0: points 0

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

May 2021

Book Genres

Fiction

Topics

Powwows. Communities. Indians of North America. Native Americans. First Nations. Cultural heritage. Conduct of life. Family life. Friendship. Short stories.

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Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 3-6–Editor Smith and 16 other authors and artists collaborate in this #OwnVoices short story collection from HarperCollins’s HeartDrum imprint, which was created to “highlight the voices of Native creators.” Each story focuses on a different character and their experience of an intertribal powwow in Michigan. The stories range from solemn to silly, but each emphasizes the power of the tribal community to support and heal its members. The well-edited volume begins with welcoming and humorous tales before moving into heavier territory. Each creator provides a short biography in the back matter, which includes their tribal affiliation and other works, in addition to their acknowledgements and notes on their contributions to the book. This anthology aims to both increase Native representation in middle grade literature and promote knowledge and understanding in non-Native readers. While not every story will be equally ­engaging for every reader and some points of overlap might seem a bit redundant, there is still more than enough to recommend this for school and public libraries everywhere. VERDICT All libraries should make room on their shelves for this collection of Native-voiced stories. Recommended. –Taylor Worley, Springfield P.L., OR

Horn Book

Through this linked anthology by seventeen contributors, readers experience “What Is a Powwow?” (the title of Kim Rogers’s opening poem), as characters converge in Ann Arbor, Michigan, for the Dance for Mother Earth Powwow. Rory begins to heal from his father’s abusive words and embrace his Indigenous heritage (“Fancy Dancer” by Monique Gray Smith). Aiden travels with his foster parents to meet his brother and dance in his first powwow (David A. Robertson’s “Brothers”). Amber, whose sister battled cancer, receives a new dress for the Jingle Dance (“Secret and Surprises” by Traci Sorell). Some of the attendees live locally, while others travel from places including Oklahoma and Missouri; some live in the city, while others live on the reservation. This anthology offers readers a variety of images of Native children while also introducing them to vocabulary from several different Indigenous languages, compiled in an appended glossary. According to Rogers’s poem: “A powwow is / friends and family / …a way to remember those / who’ve passed on / …a place for belly-laughing / …healing / and soul-soothing,” and this volume reflects all of those elements and more. Notes and acknowledgments, contributor bios, and an editor’s note are appended. NICHOLL DENICE MONTGOMERY

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 3-6–Editor Smith and 16 other authors and artists collaborate in this #OwnVoices short story collection from HarperCollins’s HeartDrum imprint, which was created to “highlight the voices of Native creators.” Each story focuses on a different character and their experience of an intertribal powwow in Michigan. The stories range from solemn to silly, but each emphasizes the power of the tribal community to support and heal its members. The well-edited volume begins with welcoming and humorous tales before moving into heavier territory. Each creator provides a short biography in the back matter, which includes their tribal affiliation and other works, in addition to their acknowledgements and notes on their contributions to the book. This anthology aims to both increase Native representation in middle grade literature and promote knowledge and understanding in non-Native readers. While not every story will be equally ­engaging for every reader and some points of overlap might seem a bit redundant, there is still more than enough to recommend this for school and public libraries everywhere. VERDICT All libraries should make room on their shelves for this collection of Native-voiced stories. Recommended. –Taylor Worley, Springfield P.L., OR

Horn Book

Through this linked anthology by seventeen contributors, readers experience “What Is a Powwow?” (the title of Kim Rogers’s opening poem), as characters converge in Ann Arbor, Michigan, for the Dance for Mother Earth Powwow. Rory begins to heal from his father’s abusive words and embrace his Indigenous heritage (“Fancy Dancer” by Monique Gray Smith). Aiden travels with his foster parents to meet his brother and dance in his first powwow (David A. Robertson’s “Brothers”). Amber, whose sister battled cancer, receives a new dress for the Jingle Dance (“Secret and Surprises” by Traci Sorell). Some of the attendees live locally, while others travel from places including Oklahoma and Missouri; some live in the city, while others live on the reservation. This anthology offers readers a variety of images of Native children while also introducing them to vocabulary from several different Indigenous languages, compiled in an appended glossary. According to Rogers’s poem: “A powwow is / friends and family / …a way to remember those / who’ve passed on / …a place for belly-laughing / …healing / and soul-soothing,” and this volume reflects all of those elements and more. Notes and acknowledgments, contributor bios, and an editor’s note are appended. NICHOLL DENICE MONTGOMERY

Grades 5-8
Realistic Fiction Middle Plus
For Grades 5-8

Stories with strong, relatable characters that portray believable contemporary or historical real-life experiences.

14 books per Year
$235.90 per Year
Interests
Chapter Books/Novels,Diversity,Fiction,History,Realistic Fiction
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Grades 5-8
Realistic Fiction Middle Plus
14 books per Year
$235.90 per Year

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