Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Sugar



by
Jewell Parker Rhodes

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Hachette Book Group
Imprint
Little, Brown
ISBN
9780316043052

Awards and Honors
Kirkus Reviews Best Children’s Books of 2013; ALA 2014 Notable Children’s Books, Middle Readers; 2014 Jane Addams Book Award Winner, Older Children; VOYA Top Shelf Fiction for Middle School Readers 2013; William Allen White Children#8217;s Book Awards 2015–2016 Master List
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Social Issue: Slavery in Historical Context
$6.00   $5.00
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

Ten-year-old Sugar, an orphan and former slave, still works in the sugarcane fields, now alongside newly arrived Chinese workers: “I’m free,” she says. “Except from sugar. ” Author’s note. Black-and-white illustrations.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Social Issue: Slavery in Historical Context

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

288

Trim Size

5 1/4" x 7 5/8"

Dewey

Fic

AR

2.9: points 4

Lexile

430L

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Aug 2013

Topics

Plantation life. Race relations. Louisiana. Reconstruction (1865-1877). Louisiana history. African Americans. Chinese Americans.

Standard MARC Records

Download Standard MARC Records

Cover Art

Download Cover Art

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal, Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA)

School Library Journal

Through the sharp eyes of a 10-year-old, readers experience the hardship of life on a Louisiana sugar plantation after Emancipation. Clever, courageous, and perceptive, Sugar is basically an orphan. Her mother died, and her father was sold five years before the story begins. She lives alone next door to Mister and Missus Beale, who have become her surrogate parents. Sugar wonders why she still can’t do what she wants and why she still must work and live under miserable conditions. When she becomes friendly with Billy Wills, the son of the plantation owner, she can’t understand why their friendship must be secret. Her feistiness and sense of loyalty shine in the poignant scenes when she insists on being with Billy when he is sick. When Mr. Wills hires Chinese workers to fill the void left by former slaves going north, Sugar is fascinated by their ways and their stories. She loves the Br’er Rabbit trickster tales Mister Beale tells in which Rabbit outsmarts the seemingly more clever hyena. As in Ninth Ward (Little, Brown, 2010), Rhodes has created a remarkable protagonist as she artfully brings American history to life. She shines a light on bigotry and the difficulty former slave owners and former slaves had adjusting to “freedom,” and her skillful prose creates vibrant images of the story’s milieu. Above all, though, this beautiful novel instantly grips readers’ attention and emotions, holding them until the last word.—Renee Steinberg, formerly at Fieldstone Middle School, Montvale, NJ

Horn Book

Sugar, a ten-year-old African American girl in Reconstruction Louisiana, hates everything about sugar: “Sugar bites a hundred times, breaking skin and making you bleed . . . Sugar calls—all kinds of bugs, crawling, inching, flying . . . I hate, hate, hate sugar.” The work on a sugarcane plantation is brutal, and Sugar’s mother died two years ago. The community of cane workers, all former slaves, is equal parts loving and disapproving of Sugar’s high spirits, but she’s increasingly lonely as the other families move away for a better life in the North. When the plantation owner’s son, Billy, starts making friendly overtures, Sugar is ready to accept, though they both know they aren’t supposed to play together. Her outgoing nature helps her reach out to the new group of Chinese sugarcane workers, and her friendship with the youngest of them enlarges her view of the world and its possibilities. Rhodes vividly depicts Sugar’s experiences and sensations, from the razor-sharp leaves of the cane field to the sights and smells of the Mississippi River, using short, direct, and evocative sentences. The novel’s plot may be a little predictable, but with her endearing feistiness, realistically shifting moods, and capacity for friendship, Sugar is an engaging and memorable character. susan dove lempke

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Through the sharp eyes of a 10-year-old, readers experience the hardship of life on a Louisiana sugar plantation after Emancipation. Clever, courageous, and perceptive, Sugar is basically an orphan. Her mother died, and her father was sold five years before the story begins. She lives alone next door to Mister and Missus Beale, who have become her surrogate parents. Sugar wonders why she still can’t do what she wants and why she still must work and live under miserable conditions. When she becomes friendly with Billy Wills, the son of the plantation owner, she can’t understand why their friendship must be secret. Her feistiness and sense of loyalty shine in the poignant scenes when she insists on being with Billy when he is sick. When Mr. Wills hires Chinese workers to fill the void left by former slaves going north, Sugar is fascinated by their ways and their stories. She loves the Br’er Rabbit trickster tales Mister Beale tells in which Rabbit outsmarts the seemingly more clever hyena. As in Ninth Ward (Little, Brown, 2010), Rhodes has created a remarkable protagonist as she artfully brings American history to life. She shines a light on bigotry and the difficulty former slave owners and former slaves had adjusting to “freedom,” and her skillful prose creates vibrant images of the story’s milieu. Above all, though, this beautiful novel instantly grips readers’ attention and emotions, holding them until the last word.—Renee Steinberg, formerly at Fieldstone Middle School, Montvale, NJ

Horn Book

Sugar, a ten-year-old African American girl in Reconstruction Louisiana, hates everything about sugar: “Sugar bites a hundred times, breaking skin and making you bleed . . . Sugar calls—all kinds of bugs, crawling, inching, flying . . . I hate, hate, hate sugar.” The work on a sugarcane plantation is brutal, and Sugar’s mother died two years ago. The community of cane workers, all former slaves, is equal parts loving and disapproving of Sugar’s high spirits, but she’s increasingly lonely as the other families move away for a better life in the North. When the plantation owner’s son, Billy, starts making friendly overtures, Sugar is ready to accept, though they both know they aren’t supposed to play together. Her outgoing nature helps her reach out to the new group of Chinese sugarcane workers, and her friendship with the youngest of them enlarges her view of the world and its possibilities. Rhodes vividly depicts Sugar’s experiences and sensations, from the razor-sharp leaves of the cane field to the sights and smells of the Mississippi River, using short, direct, and evocative sentences. The novel’s plot may be a little predictable, but with her endearing feistiness, realistically shifting moods, and capacity for friendship, Sugar is an engaging and memorable character. susan dove lempke

Grades 3-5
Intermediate Readers
For Grades 3-5

A wide variety of novels and accessible nonfiction for younger elementary readers who love a good story comprise this category of 12 books per year. The focus in these titles is primarily on the text, though some novels may feature illustration.

12 books per Year
$195.60 per Year
Interests
Chapter Books,Fiction,Transitional Readers
Like this book?
Get more like this every month.
LEARN MORE
Grades 3-5
Intermediate Readers
12 books per Year
$195.60 per Year

Other Recommended Titles From Intermediate Readers

Erik vs. Everything

by Christina Uss

Intermediate Readers

November 2021

Maya and the Robot

by Eve L. Ewing

Intermediate Readers

October 2021

Happily for Now

by Kelly Jones

Intermediate Readers

September 2021

The House That Wasn't There

by Elana K. Arnold

Intermediate Readers

August 2021
Copyright © 2017 Magento, Inc. All rights reserved.