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In the Shadow of the Fallen Towers



by
Don Brown

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Houghton
Imprint
Print
ISBN
9780358223573
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Language: Racial or Ethnic Epithet/Slur , Violence: War/Harsh Realities of War , Violence: Torture , Violence: Death
$21.42   $17.85
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A graphic novel chronicling the immediate aftermath and rippling effects of one of the most impactful days in modern history: September 11, 2001. From the Sibert Honor– and YALSA Award–winning creator behind The Unwanted and Drowned City.

The consequences of the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City, both political and personal, were vast, and continue to reverberate today. Don Brown brings his journalistic eye and attention to moving individual stories to help teens contextualize what they already know about the day, as well as broaden their understanding of the chain of events that occurred in the attack’s wake.

Profound, troubling, and deeply moving, In the Shadow of the Fallen Towers bears witness to our history—and the ways it shapes our future.Afterword. September 11 “Statistics.” Source notes. Bibliography. Full-color illustrations were created with pen and ink, and painted digitally. 

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Language: Racial or Ethnic Epithet/Slur , Violence: War/Harsh Realities of War , Violence: Torture , Violence: Death

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

128

Trim Size

10 3/10" x 6 3/5"

Dewey

973.931

AR

0: points 0

Genre

Nonfic

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Sep 2021

Book Genres

Graphic Novels, Narrative Nonfiction

Topics

September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001. World Trade Center. First responders. Ground Zero. New York City. Terrorism. War on Terrorism, 2001–2009. Islamophobia. Iraq war. Afghanistan war. Guantánamo Bay detention camp, Cuba.

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Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 7 Up–Brown’s latest work of graphic nonfiction revisits September 11, 2001, and its aftermath in time for the tragedy’s 20th anniversary. While filming a documentary about New York firefighters, French filmmaker Jules Naudet shifts his lens skyward as the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center are struck by airliners and, ultimately, collapse. Using vivid phrases like “debris-strewn whirlwind,” “ocean of rubble,” and “snowfall of papers,” Brown captions emotional illustrations that depict the wreckage of the ­towers and, later, the Pentagon. Scenes of family members and first responders alike searching for survivors in the following days, weeks, and months are juxtaposed with depictions of the United States’ response to the attacks, including war in the Middle East and a rise in Islamaphobic incidents domestically. Alternating between war and recovery, the remaining pages end with a ceremony one year later where the names of the 2,753 victims are read aloud. Though for a different and more mature audience, Brown’s second attempt at covering this topic (after 2011’s America Is Under Attack) is a more comprehensive look at the tragedy for an older audience. With a palette of mostly cool or ashy watercolors, the red heat of the destruction abruptly and noticeably pops off the page. Varied panel layouts capture the frenetic pace of the emergency, while spreads offer powerful moments of pause. Detailed back matter includes an afterword, sobering statistics, source notes, and an extensive bibliography. Most of the subjects featured in the book are white. ­VERDICT A succinct and impactful look at one of America’s worst tragedies, skillfully rendered by one of comics journalism’s best. –Alec Chunn, Eugene P.L., OR

Horn Book

Brown’s America Is Under Attack (rev. 11/11) offered a superb dramatic account of the events of September 11th for readers too young to have remembered it. Here he returns to the topic with a volume for teen readers and a twenty-year perspective on the tragedy. The book begins with the attack itself and its immediate aftermath, capturing the horror, heroism, and particular personal stories and details—claustrophobic images of survivors entombed for hours until pulled from the rubble, exhausted firefighters and rescue dogs, stranded pets, and shoes “absent their owners” littering the ground. The story continues, as Brown depicts subsequent American attacks on Afghanistan and the Taliban, with graphic images of hooded prisoners, waterboarding, and confinement of captives in small boxes. Meanwhile, in the U.S., 108,342 truckloads of rubble are hauled away, a new Freedom Tower is erected, and hope arises from the ashes, a bright American flag dazzling against Brown’s palette of browns and grays. A construction worker on a beam above the skyline delivers a patriotic note: “They hit the World Trade Center. They hit the Pentagon. But they missed America.” Once again, Brown (Drowned City, rev. 9/15; The Unwanted, rev. 9/18; A Shot in the Arm!, rev. 5/21) shows his mastery of the graphic format for portraying humanity in the most trying of circumstances. Back matter includes an informative afterword, statistics, source notes, and an extensive bibliography. DEAN SCHNEIDER

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 7 Up–Brown’s latest work of graphic nonfiction revisits September 11, 2001, and its aftermath in time for the tragedy’s 20th anniversary. While filming a documentary about New York firefighters, French filmmaker Jules Naudet shifts his lens skyward as the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center are struck by airliners and, ultimately, collapse. Using vivid phrases like “debris-strewn whirlwind,” “ocean of rubble,” and “snowfall of papers,” Brown captions emotional illustrations that depict the wreckage of the ­towers and, later, the Pentagon. Scenes of family members and first responders alike searching for survivors in the following days, weeks, and months are juxtaposed with depictions of the United States’ response to the attacks, including war in the Middle East and a rise in Islamaphobic incidents domestically. Alternating between war and recovery, the remaining pages end with a ceremony one year later where the names of the 2,753 victims are read aloud. Though for a different and more mature audience, Brown’s second attempt at covering this topic (after 2011’s America Is Under Attack) is a more comprehensive look at the tragedy for an older audience. With a palette of mostly cool or ashy watercolors, the red heat of the destruction abruptly and noticeably pops off the page. Varied panel layouts capture the frenetic pace of the emergency, while spreads offer powerful moments of pause. Detailed back matter includes an afterword, sobering statistics, source notes, and an extensive bibliography. Most of the subjects featured in the book are white. ­VERDICT A succinct and impactful look at one of America’s worst tragedies, skillfully rendered by one of comics journalism’s best. –Alec Chunn, Eugene P.L., OR

Horn Book

Brown’s America Is Under Attack (rev. 11/11) offered a superb dramatic account of the events of September 11th for readers too young to have remembered it. Here he returns to the topic with a volume for teen readers and a twenty-year perspective on the tragedy. The book begins with the attack itself and its immediate aftermath, capturing the horror, heroism, and particular personal stories and details—claustrophobic images of survivors entombed for hours until pulled from the rubble, exhausted firefighters and rescue dogs, stranded pets, and shoes “absent their owners” littering the ground. The story continues, as Brown depicts subsequent American attacks on Afghanistan and the Taliban, with graphic images of hooded prisoners, waterboarding, and confinement of captives in small boxes. Meanwhile, in the U.S., 108,342 truckloads of rubble are hauled away, a new Freedom Tower is erected, and hope arises from the ashes, a bright American flag dazzling against Brown’s palette of browns and grays. A construction worker on a beam above the skyline delivers a patriotic note: “They hit the World Trade Center. They hit the Pentagon. But they missed America.” Once again, Brown (Drowned City, rev. 9/15; The Unwanted, rev. 9/18; A Shot in the Arm!, rev. 5/21) shows his mastery of the graphic format for portraying humanity in the most trying of circumstances. Back matter includes an informative afterword, statistics, source notes, and an extensive bibliography. DEAN SCHNEIDER

Grades 9 & Up
Graphic Novels High Plus
For Grades 9 & Up

Book-length narratives presented in comic book style, graphic novels foster both visual and verbal comprehension skills while exposing readers to interesting dialogue and satire, as well as affirming diversity.

These unique books, some of them only published in softcover, are ideal for attracting reluctant readers and introducing them to literature they might not encounter otherwise. You may find that the 12 books in this category will turn your reluctant readers into eager readers.

14 books per Year
$249.90 per Year
Interests
Diversity,Fiction,High Interest/Reluctant Reader,Nonfiction,Struggling Readers,Novels
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Grades 9 & Up
Graphic Novels High Plus
14 books per Year
$249.90 per Year

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