Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation



by
Edwidge Danticat
illustrated by
Leslie Staub

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Penguin
Imprint
Dial
ISBN
9780525428091

Awards and Honors
2016 Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Honor Younger Children
Kirkus Reviews Best Children’s Books of 2015, Picture Books
Chicago Public Library Best Books of 2015, Picture Books
New York Public Library’s 100 Notable Titles for Reading and Sharing 2015, Children’s Books
2016 CCBC Choices– Picture Books forSchool-Age Children
2015 Cybils Award Nomination, Fiction Picture Books
Best Multicultural Books of 2015
Charlotte Zolotow, 2016 Highly Commended
Children’s Book Committee Bank Street College of Education Best Children’s Books of 2016, Today
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$12.00   $5.00
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

Easy Reading Plus

Held at an immigration detention center, Saya’s mother records and sends Saya bedtime stories inspired by Haitian folklore. Saya then writes her own story—one that helps to bring her mother home. Author’s note. Full-color illustrations done in oil paint.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

32

Trim Size

10" x 10"

AR

3.9: points 0.5

Lexile

NC890L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

2

JLG Release

Jan 2016

Book Genres


Topics

Mothers and daughters. Separation (psychology). Detention of persons. Emigration and immigration. Haitian Americans.

Standard MARC Records

Download Standard MARC Records

Cover Art

Download Cover Art

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Brightly colored folk art with a Caribbean flair offsets the sadness of a little girl whose Haitian mother has been sent away to a prison for undocumented immigrants. Every night, Saya’s father writes letters to the judges, their mayor and congresswoman, and newspapers and television stations, but no one ever writes back. During their weekly visits to the detention center, Saya’s mother tells her stories of the wosiyòl, or nightingale. Soon, Saya begins to receive cassette tapes in the mail from her mother and finds hope and solace in the stories Mama has recorded for her. One night, amid a great deal of sadness and frustration, Saya writes a story of her own to ease the sadness. When Papa sends her letter to a newspaper reporter, everything changes, and Saya learns the incredible power of words and stories. Danticat, who was born in Haiti, was separated from her parents until she was 12 years old and beautifully conveys a story about loss and grief and hope and joy. Staub’s oil paintings are eye-catching and will hold the interest of young readers. VERDICT This richly illustrated picture book is a first purchase, especially in communities with a large immigrant population.—Jennifer Steib Simmons, Anderson County Library, SC

Horn Book

“When Mama first goes away, what I miss most is the sound of her voice.” So begins this gentle story of Saya, a Haitian American girl whose mother is incarcerated because she has no papers. The weeks and months go by, and Saya’s father does all he can to bring attention to his wife’s situation by writing letters to elected officials and the press. Danticat does not shy away from the realities—in direct, resonant prose, she tells about the loneliness of missing your mother, the trauma of saying goodbye at the immigration detention facility, and the effort that it takes to get your story heard. Occasional sprinkling of Kreyol (Haitian Creole) words in the dialogue make the story specific to Saya and other Haitians, but the larger issue of the plight of refugees and immigrants makes it universal. Staub’s naive-style oil paintings, filled with symbols of freedom and infused with the bright colors of Haiti, keep the focus on the child. We see Saya in her pajamas holding her mother’s picture, resting on her father’s lap; visiting her mother and kicking and screaming when forced to leave. Children who know nothing about the immigration crisis in this country will have lots of questions after getting to know Saya and her family. Children of parents who are being detained will be comforted by knowing they are not the only ones facing this challenge and might even be inspired to take action the way Saya does. robin l. smith

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Brightly colored folk art with a Caribbean flair offsets the sadness of a little girl whose Haitian mother has been sent away to a prison for undocumented immigrants. Every night, Saya’s father writes letters to the judges, their mayor and congresswoman, and newspapers and television stations, but no one ever writes back. During their weekly visits to the detention center, Saya’s mother tells her stories of the wosiyòl, or nightingale. Soon, Saya begins to receive cassette tapes in the mail from her mother and finds hope and solace in the stories Mama has recorded for her. One night, amid a great deal of sadness and frustration, Saya writes a story of her own to ease the sadness. When Papa sends her letter to a newspaper reporter, everything changes, and Saya learns the incredible power of words and stories. Danticat, who was born in Haiti, was separated from her parents until she was 12 years old and beautifully conveys a story about loss and grief and hope and joy. Staub’s oil paintings are eye-catching and will hold the interest of young readers. VERDICT This richly illustrated picture book is a first purchase, especially in communities with a large immigrant population.—Jennifer Steib Simmons, Anderson County Library, SC

Horn Book

“When Mama first goes away, what I miss most is the sound of her voice.” So begins this gentle story of Saya, a Haitian American girl whose mother is incarcerated because she has no papers. The weeks and months go by, and Saya’s father does all he can to bring attention to his wife’s situation by writing letters to elected officials and the press. Danticat does not shy away from the realities—in direct, resonant prose, she tells about the loneliness of missing your mother, the trauma of saying goodbye at the immigration detention facility, and the effort that it takes to get your story heard. Occasional sprinkling of Kreyol (Haitian Creole) words in the dialogue make the story specific to Saya and other Haitians, but the larger issue of the plight of refugees and immigrants makes it universal. Staub’s naive-style oil paintings, filled with symbols of freedom and infused with the bright colors of Haiti, keep the focus on the child. We see Saya in her pajamas holding her mother’s picture, resting on her father’s lap; visiting her mother and kicking and screaming when forced to leave. Children who know nothing about the immigration crisis in this country will have lots of questions after getting to know Saya and her family. Children of parents who are being detained will be comforted by knowing they are not the only ones facing this challenge and might even be inspired to take action the way Saya does. robin l. smith

Grades 1-3
Easy Reading Plus
For Grades 1-3

Don't stop at just 12. Order this extended category and treat your students to even more challenges-with 12 additional Easy Reading titles delivered to your library each year.

14 books per Year
$213.50 per Year
Interests
Beginning Readers,Chapter Books,Fiction,Picture Books
Like this book?
Get more like this every month.
LEARN MORE
Grades 1-3
Easy Reading Plus
14 books per Year
$213.50 per Year

Other Recommended Titles From Easy Reading Plus

Easy Reading Plus

October 2021

When Grandfather Flew

by Patricia MacLachlan

Easy Reading Plus

October 2021

Easy Reading Plus

September 2021

Easy Reading Plus

September 2021
Copyright © 2017 Magento, Inc. All rights reserved.