My Papi Has a Motorcycle

By: Isabel Quintero

Illustrator: Zeke Peña

When Daisy Ramona zooms around her neighborhood with her papi on his motorcycle, she sees the people and places she’s always known. She also sees a community that is rapidly changing around her. But as the sun sets purple-blue-gold behind Daisy Ramona and her papi, she knows that the love she feels will always be there.

Author’s note. Full-color digital illustrations created with a mix of hand-painted watercolor texture.

ISBN: 9780525553410

JLG Release: Jul 2019


Sensitive Areas: None
Topics: Fathers and daughters , Motorcycles , Neighborhoods , Latin Americans , Hispanic and Latino people , Family life , Parents , City and town life , California

$17.55  Member Price


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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Publishers Weekly*, The Horn Book Magazine*, Booklist*, School Library Journal*, Kirkus Reviews

School Library Journal

A radiant ode to a young girl’s father and her L.A. neighborhood. Every evening, Daisy and her papi snap on their helmets (hers is purple with a unicorn, his a black vintage variety) and begin their ride on his electric blue motorcycle through Corona, CA. At times they “roar past” taquerias and murals, and other times they “cruise,” greet A radiant ode to a young girl’s father and her L.A. neighborhood. Every evening, Daisy and her papi snap on their helmets (hers is purple with a unicorn, his a black vintage variety) and begin their ride on his electric blue motorcycle through Corona, CA. At times they “roar past” taquerias and murals, and other times they “cruise,” greeting family and neighbors as they pass by. All the while, Daisy absorbs the sights, sounds, and smells of her beloved hometown, imprinting its idiosyncrasies into memory. Daisy’s experiences mirror Quintero’s childhood memories, recounted through tender language and vivid sensory details. Recalling the motorcycle rides with her papi is an exercise in familial love, but also a way to honor a hometown and present the changes from gentrification. Although the topic is touched upon lightly, its complexity percolates and becomes much more vivid with multiple reads. The illustrations faithfully capture the merriment and love through careful details and a low-key color palette that alludes to warm memories being made and recollected. Peña makes felicitous use of his comics chops, incorporating speech balloons with Spanish phrases, onomatopoeia, and panels to convey movement. Quintero’s writing and Peña’s art coalesce most beautifully in the infectious look of joy on Daisy’s face throughout. A book that radiates sheer happiness without shying from reality.

Horn Book

Quintero’s picture-book text acts as an evocative love letter to her apá and to the interconnected web of Mexican immigrant working-class people who built her hometown of Corona, California. When Papi gets home from work, young Daisy jumps into his arms for a hug (the warmth of his body language expressing “all the love he has trouble saying Quintero’s picture-book text acts as an evocative love letter to her apá and to the interconnected web of Mexican immigrant working-class people who built her hometown of Corona, California. When Papi gets home from work, young Daisy jumps into his arms for a hug (the warmth of his body language expressing “all the love he has trouble saying”), then grabs their helmets, eager to zoom through their neighborhood on Papi’s speedy blue motorcycle before the sun goes down. Peña’s joyous digital and hand-painted watercolor illustrations capture the sights, sounds, smells, tastes, and “redbluegreenorangepink” colors of the town. They observe the community’s many people and institutions that contribute to the well-being and harmony of “everyone and everything [Daisy and Papi] pass” on their motorcycle ride. There’s Abuelito and Abuelita’s yellow house with the lemon tree and the nopales; murals “that tell our history”; there’s Mr. García, the librar¬ian in the Dodgers cap, with whom they exchange nods (“this is how we always greet each other”); and the raspados man. All of this—plus the text’s nuanced alliteration, its use of Spanglish, and the realistic linguistic mix in the illustrations (even the cat says both meow and miau)—marks the quotidian specificity shaping Daisy’s memory-making as well as her loving reflections on Corona’s unfolding changes, its history and future. An appended author’s note tells more about Quin¬tero’s inspiration. Concurrently published in Spanish as Mi papi tiene una moto.

Book Details

ISBN

9780525553410

First Release

July 2019

Genre

Fic

Dewey Classification

E

Trim Size

9" x 11"

Page Count

40

Accelerated Reader

Level 0; Points: 0;

Scholastic Reading Counts

Level 0; Points: 0;

Lexile

Level AD750L

Format

Print Book

Edition

Hardcover edition

Publisher

Kokila

Potentially Sensitive Areas

None

Topics

Fathers and daughters, Motorcycles, Neighborhoods, Latin Americans, Hispanic and Latino people, Family life, Parents, City and town life, California,

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Cover Art

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