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Miss Moore Thought Otherwise: How Anne Carroll Moore Created Libraries for Children



by
Jan Pinborough
illustrated by
Debby Atwell

Edition
Library edition
Publisher
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Imprint
Houghton Mifflin
ISBN
9780547471051

Awards and Honors
Triple Crown National Book Award 2016-2017
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$20.39   $16.99
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QTY
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In the late 1800s, many librarians did not allow children to touch books or bring them home, since “they would surely forget to bring them back.” Anne Carroll Moore disagreed. More about Anne Carroll Moore and other trailblazing librarians. Sources. Photographs of Anne Carroll Moore. Full-color acrylic illustrations.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

40

Trim Size

8" x 10 1/2"

Dewey

020.92

AR

5.6: points 0.5

Lexile

AD1060L

Genre

Nonfic

Scholastic Reading Counts

2

JLG Release

Jun 2013

Book Genres


Topics

Anne Carroll Moore (1871-1961). New York Public Library. U.S. children's librarians. Biography. History of U.S. children's libraries.

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

From early childhood, Moore had “ideas of her own” and “preferred taking wild toboggan rides” to staying indoors and doing the quiet things expected of girls in the 1870s. Pinborough’s introduction to the pioneering librarian’s Maine upbringing quickly identifies her independent thinking and strong opinions for which she was known. This picture-book account then focuses on her role in designing the famous children’s room during construction of New York City’s historic central library, her activities in developing services there, and her influence on the promotion of children’s books and the wider field of children’s library services. Readers learn that some libraries had become more welcoming to children in the late 19th and early 20th centuries though many were still inhospitable to them. The enthusiastic narrative makes it seem that Moore was a singular force in developing special rooms for children. “In big cities and small towns across America, more and more libraries began to copy Miss Moore’s Central Children’s Room. So did libraries in England, France, Belgium, Sweden, Russia, India and Japan.” A concluding author’s note does explain that other librarians were actually forerunners of Moore. Atwell’s sunny, naive paintings and vignettes vary nicely in layout with many filling the page and a few set in frames or sweeping in circular lines. The flat figures in cheerful countryside, city, and library settings convey a long-ago time. The text is wooden at times but competent in telling its story. As a lesson in library history it will be most interesting to adults, who may also find enjoyable items in the bibliography of adult sources. It might also find readers among children who enjoy reading about earlier times —Margaret Bush, Simmons College, Boston

Horn Book

Nowadays, Anne Carroll Moore is remembered as the fiercest of the library ladies whose influence on children’s library service and publishing was both inspirational and—sometimes—intractable. But this easygoing picture-book biography forgoes coverage of the more formidable aspects of Moore’s personality, giving us instead a simple narrative of Moore’s Maine childhood and early love of books on through to her career at the New York Public Library, where she created the innovative Central Children’s Room for the library’s new main building in 1911. With sun-dappled acrylic paintings of, first, rural Maine and, later, triumphantly, the light-filled interiors of the new Children’s Room, the tone here is one of uncomplicated optimism, reflecting Moore’s practical idealism. A bird’s-eye view of Miss Moore setting off on her “retirement” travels spreading the gospel of children’s librarianship across the land clearly places this apostle in the company of her (fictional) Maine sister, Miss Rumphius. “More about Miss Moore” and a list of sources are appended. roger sutton

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

From early childhood, Moore had “ideas of her own” and “preferred taking wild toboggan rides” to staying indoors and doing the quiet things expected of girls in the 1870s. Pinborough’s introduction to the pioneering librarian’s Maine upbringing quickly identifies her independent thinking and strong opinions for which she was known. This picture-book account then focuses on her role in designing the famous children’s room during construction of New York City’s historic central library, her activities in developing services there, and her influence on the promotion of children’s books and the wider field of children’s library services. Readers learn that some libraries had become more welcoming to children in the late 19th and early 20th centuries though many were still inhospitable to them. The enthusiastic narrative makes it seem that Moore was a singular force in developing special rooms for children. “In big cities and small towns across America, more and more libraries began to copy Miss Moore’s Central Children’s Room. So did libraries in England, France, Belgium, Sweden, Russia, India and Japan.” A concluding author’s note does explain that other librarians were actually forerunners of Moore. Atwell’s sunny, naive paintings and vignettes vary nicely in layout with many filling the page and a few set in frames or sweeping in circular lines. The flat figures in cheerful countryside, city, and library settings convey a long-ago time. The text is wooden at times but competent in telling its story. As a lesson in library history it will be most interesting to adults, who may also find enjoyable items in the bibliography of adult sources. It might also find readers among children who enjoy reading about earlier times —Margaret Bush, Simmons College, Boston

Horn Book

Nowadays, Anne Carroll Moore is remembered as the fiercest of the library ladies whose influence on children’s library service and publishing was both inspirational and—sometimes—intractable. But this easygoing picture-book biography forgoes coverage of the more formidable aspects of Moore’s personality, giving us instead a simple narrative of Moore’s Maine childhood and early love of books on through to her career at the New York Public Library, where she created the innovative Central Children’s Room for the library’s new main building in 1911. With sun-dappled acrylic paintings of, first, rural Maine and, later, triumphantly, the light-filled interiors of the new Children’s Room, the tone here is one of uncomplicated optimism, reflecting Moore’s practical idealism. A bird’s-eye view of Miss Moore setting off on her “retirement” travels spreading the gospel of children’s librarianship across the land clearly places this apostle in the company of her (fictional) Maine sister, Miss Rumphius. “More about Miss Moore” and a list of sources are appended. roger sutton

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