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Ivy Takes Care



by
Rosemary Wells
illustrated by
Jim LaMarche

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Candlewick
Imprint
Candlewick
ISBN
9780763653521
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$12.00   $5.00
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

Nevada, 1949: “I didn’t think I could do it . . . I thought I was afraid of needles, but I’m not.” Ivy has always cared for animals, but could she become a veterinarian? Black-and-white illustrations created using acrylic washes and pencils.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

208

Trim Size

5 1/2" x 7 13/16"

Dewey

F

AR

5.2: points 4

Lexile

830L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

8

JLG Release

Jun 2013

Book Genres


Topics

Nevada. Ranch life. Caring for animals. Friendship.

Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

Twelve-year-old Ivy Coleman’s hardscrabble ranching family is just scraping by, while her friend Annie Evans’s well-to-do parents can afford to send her to an expensive East Coast summer camp. Their differences never seemed that important before, but this year Ivy starts feeling inferior to Annie’s camp friends. They part ways for the summer on bad terms, which inspires Ivy to buy Annie a conciliatory Tru-Friendship ring. To earn the money, she starts a pet-sitting business. Annie moves to the back of Ivy’s mind as she focuses on interacting with her animal charges and her aspirations to become a veterinarian. While Ivy is unflappably responsible, her neighbor Billy Joe Butterworth often tags along and wreaks havoc at every job. Fortunately, the kindly local vet always sets things right. Ivy does, in fact, buy Annie the ring, yet they aren’t able to reclaim the closeness they once had. But now Ivy has her business and the dream of becoming a vet, and she holds these things tight as Annie drifts away. Parts of the story are a touch didactic—they can read like a manual on how to care for animals. Ivy is perhaps too responsible to be believable, yet she is still immensely likable and will inspire children who are interested in veterinary care. There are quite a few highly suspenseful moments when animals are in peril, and these instances keep the pages turning. Give this one to animal lovers.—Amy Holland, Irondequoit Public Library, NY

Horn Book

In the summer of 1949 in western Nevada, things are changing for thoughtful fifth-grader Ivy, who has a special gift with animals. Ivy senses a shift when her closest friend Annie departs for her privileged summer camp in New Hampshire. Though Ivy lacks Annie’s monetary resources, she is resourceful in her own way and starts a pet care business with the intent of buying Annie a friendship ring. The ring can’t hold Annie, but Ivy’s three clients and their animals broaden her world and her relationship with others in remarkable ways. Ivy is a mature character with strong insight: “She realized that she missed Inca much more than she had missed Annie. With a dog, there was no guessing as to who loved whom in the world.” The vividly evoked rural setting tends to overshadow the book’s historical period, but the moving story, told from a third-person limited perspective, brings the characters to life for young readers. Ivy will need her independent nature and confident spirit to achieve her ambitions, but readers can see that with her open heart and mind, she will never be truly lonely. Occasional spot art unseen. julie roach

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Twelve-year-old Ivy Coleman’s hardscrabble ranching family is just scraping by, while her friend Annie Evans’s well-to-do parents can afford to send her to an expensive East Coast summer camp. Their differences never seemed that important before, but this year Ivy starts feeling inferior to Annie’s camp friends. They part ways for the summer on bad terms, which inspires Ivy to buy Annie a conciliatory Tru-Friendship ring. To earn the money, she starts a pet-sitting business. Annie moves to the back of Ivy’s mind as she focuses on interacting with her animal charges and her aspirations to become a veterinarian. While Ivy is unflappably responsible, her neighbor Billy Joe Butterworth often tags along and wreaks havoc at every job. Fortunately, the kindly local vet always sets things right. Ivy does, in fact, buy Annie the ring, yet they aren’t able to reclaim the closeness they once had. But now Ivy has her business and the dream of becoming a vet, and she holds these things tight as Annie drifts away. Parts of the story are a touch didactic—they can read like a manual on how to care for animals. Ivy is perhaps too responsible to be believable, yet she is still immensely likable and will inspire children who are interested in veterinary care. There are quite a few highly suspenseful moments when animals are in peril, and these instances keep the pages turning. Give this one to animal lovers.—Amy Holland, Irondequoit Public Library, NY

Horn Book

In the summer of 1949 in western Nevada, things are changing for thoughtful fifth-grader Ivy, who has a special gift with animals. Ivy senses a shift when her closest friend Annie departs for her privileged summer camp in New Hampshire. Though Ivy lacks Annie’s monetary resources, she is resourceful in her own way and starts a pet care business with the intent of buying Annie a friendship ring. The ring can’t hold Annie, but Ivy’s three clients and their animals broaden her world and her relationship with others in remarkable ways. Ivy is a mature character with strong insight: “She realized that she missed Inca much more than she had missed Annie. With a dog, there was no guessing as to who loved whom in the world.” The vividly evoked rural setting tends to overshadow the book’s historical period, but the moving story, told from a third-person limited perspective, brings the characters to life for young readers. Ivy will need her independent nature and confident spirit to achieve her ambitions, but readers can see that with her open heart and mind, she will never be truly lonely. Occasional spot art unseen. julie roach

Grades 3-5
Intermediate Readers
For Grades 3-5

A wide variety of novels and accessible nonfiction for younger elementary readers who love a good story comprise this category of 12 books per year. The focus in these titles is primarily on the text, though some novels may feature illustration.

12 books per Year
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Interests
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Intermediate Readers
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