Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures



by
Kate DiCamillo
illustrated by
K. G. Campbell

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Candlewick
Imprint
Candlewick
ISBN
9780763660406

Awards and Honors
Amazon.com Best Books of the Year 2013: Ages 9-12; Publishers Weekly Best Books of 2013, Children’s Fiction; National Book Award for Young People’s Literature, 2013 Longlist; Kirkus Reviews Best Children’s Books of 2013; SLJs Best Books of 2013, Fiction; Booklist Editor’s Choice: Books for Youth, 2013, Fiction; 2014 Newbery Medal Winner; ALA 2014 Notable Children’s Books, Middle Readers; 2014 E. B White Read-Aloud Winner, Middle Reader; 2014 Christopher Award Winner, Ages 8 & up
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$21.59   $17.99
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

Flora, a cynic, is not easily surprised. But finding a flying, poetry-writing, superhero squirrel and meeting “profoundly strange” William Spiver? “Holy bagumba.” Black-and-white illustrations done in pencil.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

240

Trim Size

6" x 8"

Dewey

F

AR

4.3: points 5

Lexile

520L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

9

JLG Release

Nov 2013

Book Genres


Topics

Family life. Neighbors. Friendship. Squirrels. Superpowers. Comic books. Humorous stories.

Standard MARC Records

Download Standard MARC Records

Cover Art

Download Cover Art

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Booklist*, The Horn Book Magazine, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Flora, obsessed with superhero comics, immediately recognizes and gives her wholehearted support to a squirrel that, after a near-fatal brush with a vacuum cleaner, develops the ability to fly and type poetry. The 10-year-old hides her new friend from the certain disapproval of her self-absorbed, romance-writer mother, but it is on the woman’s typewriter that Ulysses pours out his creations. Like DiCamillo’s The Magician’s Elephant (Candlewick, 2009), this touching piece of magical realism unfolds with increasing urgency over a mere few days and brings its somewhat caricatured, old-fashioned characters together into what becomes a supportive community for all. Campbell’s rounded and gentle soft-penciled illustrations, at times in the form of panel art furthering the action, wonderfully match and add to the sweetness of this oddball story. Rife with marvelously rich vocabulary reminiscent of the early superhero era (e.g., “Holy unanticipated occurrences!”) and amusing glimpses at the world from the point of view of Ulysses the supersquirrel, this book will appeal to a broad audience of sophisticated readers. There are plenty of action sequences, but the novel primarily dwells in the realm of sensitive, hopeful, and quietly philosophical literature.—Rhona Campbell, Georgetown Day School, Washington, DC

SLJ’s Best Books December 2013, Fiction
Holy bagumba! When Flora Belle Buckman witnesses her neighbor’s super powered vacuum suck up an unsuspecting squirrel, an unlikely friendship is born. DiCamillo expertly balances the comically absurd with the quietly philosophical while Campbell’s graphic-novel-style illustrations add punch to this instant classic.

Horn Book

Ten-year-old Flora Belle Buckman’s life changes when she resuscitates a squirrel after his near-death experience with her neighbor’s Ulysses 2000X vacuum. Flora discovers that the incident has caused the squirrel, whom she also names Ulysses, to acquire superpowers. Despite being a “natural-born cynic,” Flora’s lively imagination and love of comics such as The Illuminated Adventures of the Amazing Incandesto! help her believe that Ulysses is bound for superhero greatness. There’s only one problem: Ulysses’s archnemesis, Flora’s self-absorbed, romance novel–writing, squirrel-hating mother. Beneath the basic superhero-squirrel-friend plot, DiCamillo imbues this novel with emotion by focusing on larger life issues such as loss and abandonment, acceptance of difference, loneliness, love, overcoming fears, and the complexity of relationships. She also adds plenty of warmth and humor throughout: Flora enjoys using catch phrases and big words (“holy bagumba!”; malfeasance; capacious); Ulysses loves to eat…just about anything; and there is a quirky supporting cast, including Flora’s absent-minded father, her eleven-year-old neighbor William Spiver, and his great-aunt, Tootie Tickham. Campbell’s full-page and spot pencil illustrations accentuate the mood, while interspersed comic-book pages “illuminate” Ulysses’s superhero adventures and serve as a nice visual complement to Flora’s love of comics. This little girl and squirrel and their heartwarming tale could melt even the most hardened archnemesis’s heart. CYNTHIA K. RITTER

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Flora, obsessed with superhero comics, immediately recognizes and gives her wholehearted support to a squirrel that, after a near-fatal brush with a vacuum cleaner, develops the ability to fly and type poetry. The 10-year-old hides her new friend from the certain disapproval of her self-absorbed, romance-writer mother, but it is on the woman’s typewriter that Ulysses pours out his creations. Like DiCamillo’s The Magician’s Elephant (Candlewick, 2009), this touching piece of magical realism unfolds with increasing urgency over a mere few days and brings its somewhat caricatured, old-fashioned characters together into what becomes a supportive community for all. Campbell’s rounded and gentle soft-penciled illustrations, at times in the form of panel art furthering the action, wonderfully match and add to the sweetness of this oddball story. Rife with marvelously rich vocabulary reminiscent of the early superhero era (e.g., “Holy unanticipated occurrences!”) and amusing glimpses at the world from the point of view of Ulysses the supersquirrel, this book will appeal to a broad audience of sophisticated readers. There are plenty of action sequences, but the novel primarily dwells in the realm of sensitive, hopeful, and quietly philosophical literature.—Rhona Campbell, Georgetown Day School, Washington, DC

SLJ’s Best Books December 2013, Fiction
Holy bagumba! When Flora Belle Buckman witnesses her neighbor’s super powered vacuum suck up an unsuspecting squirrel, an unlikely friendship is born. DiCamillo expertly balances the comically absurd with the quietly philosophical while Campbell’s graphic-novel-style illustrations add punch to this instant classic.

Horn Book

Ten-year-old Flora Belle Buckman’s life changes when she resuscitates a squirrel after his near-death experience with her neighbor’s Ulysses 2000X vacuum. Flora discovers that the incident has caused the squirrel, whom she also names Ulysses, to acquire superpowers. Despite being a “natural-born cynic,” Flora’s lively imagination and love of comics such as The Illuminated Adventures of the Amazing Incandesto! help her believe that Ulysses is bound for superhero greatness. There’s only one problem: Ulysses’s archnemesis, Flora’s self-absorbed, romance novel–writing, squirrel-hating mother. Beneath the basic superhero-squirrel-friend plot, DiCamillo imbues this novel with emotion by focusing on larger life issues such as loss and abandonment, acceptance of difference, loneliness, love, overcoming fears, and the complexity of relationships. She also adds plenty of warmth and humor throughout: Flora enjoys using catch phrases and big words (“holy bagumba!”; malfeasance; capacious); Ulysses loves to eat…just about anything; and there is a quirky supporting cast, including Flora’s absent-minded father, her eleven-year-old neighbor William Spiver, and his great-aunt, Tootie Tickham. Campbell’s full-page and spot pencil illustrations accentuate the mood, while interspersed comic-book pages “illuminate” Ulysses’s superhero adventures and serve as a nice visual complement to Flora’s love of comics. This little girl and squirrel and their heartwarming tale could melt even the most hardened archnemesis’s heart. CYNTHIA K. RITTER

Grades 3-5
Intermediate Readers Plus
For Grades 3-5

We just couldn't stop there. Our A category is so rich, we extended it with an A+ category-giving you the opportunity to receive 12 additional Intermediate titles every year.

14 books per Year
$228.20 per Year
Interests
Chapter Books,Fiction,Transitional Readers
Like this book?
Get more like this every month.
LEARN MORE
Grades 3-5
Intermediate Readers Plus
14 books per Year
$228.20 per Year

Other Recommended Titles From Intermediate Readers Plus

Lena, the Sea, and Me

by Maria Parr

Intermediate Readers Plus

December 2021

Rosetown Summer

by Cynthia Rylant

Intermediate Readers Plus

November 2021

Return of ZomBert

by Kara LaReau

Intermediate Readers Plus

October 2021

Intermediate Readers Plus

October 2021
Copyright © 2017 Magento, Inc. All rights reserved.