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Where Are You Going, Baby Lincoln?: Tales from Deckawoo Drive, Volume Three


Series
Tales from Deckawoo Drive

by
Kate DiCamillo
illustrated by
Chris Van Dusen

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Candlewick
Imprint
Candlewick
ISBN
9780763673116

Awards and Honors
New York Public Library 2016 Best Books for Kids, Easy Readers
ALSC Notable Children’s Books 2017, Younger Readers
Parents’ Choice Award Winner, Fiction Silver
2016 Cybils Finalist, Early Chapter Books
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$10.80   $9.00
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QTY
Out of stock

What if timid Baby Lincoln broke free of her bossy sister and set off on an unexpected journey? Who might she meet, and what could she discover about herself? Black-and-white gouache illustrations.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

112

Trim Size

7 3/4" x 5 1/3"

AR

3.7: points 1

Lexile

490L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

4

JLG Release

Sep 2016

Book Genres


Topics

Sisters. Sibling relationships. Travel. Train trips. Adventures. Meeting new people. Returning home.

Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Booklist*, The Horn Book Magazine, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

Baby Lincoln has grown tired of living under the constant direction of her older sister Eugenia and has finally said enough is enough. Planning a “necessary journey,” she packs her suitcase, complete with a library book, and heads to the train station. Fans of DiCamillo’s “Mercy Watson” series will recognize Baby Lincoln and her home on Deckawoo Drive, while new readers will easily jump into this tale of sibling frustration. Students unfamiliar with Baby will be in hysterics to see that, despite her name, she’s an older lady, complete with gray hair and wrinkles. Those who have bossy older (or younger) siblings will immediately connect with Baby as she sets off to experience life without the direction of her older sister. Baby makes new friends (like George, a young boy scared of wolf attacks) and discoveries (learning she enjoys comics and jelly beans) and ultimately finds herself missing her sister and wanting to return home. VERDICT Lending itself well to classroom read-alouds and discussions, and independent and bedtime reading, this title is most certainly a recommended purchase for those serving a young elementary age range.—Shana Morales, Windsor Public Library, CT

Horn Book

DiCamillo continues the relay of Tales from Deckawoo Drive, as minor characters from previous books (Leroy Ninker Saddles Up, rev. 9/14; Francine Poulet Meets the Ghost Racoon, rev. 9/15) grab the baton for their own stories. In this third series entry, the Lincoln sisters, a pair we met in the Mercy Watson books (of which this series is a spinoff), take center stage. Eugenia Lincoln is hard-nosed, tyrannical, and humorless. Lucille Lincoln, known as Baby, is soft-hearted, timid, and oppressed. The story kicks off as Baby accesses just enough gumption to take a train trip by herself. In the course of this journey she makes friends and gains self-confidence, and when she returns home, Eugenia unbends enough to admit that she missed her. It ends with buttered toast, love, and a cameo appearance by Mercy Watson the pig. A generous helping of full-page and spot illustrations adds to the energy and to our understanding of the characters. These stories—with their portrait of timeless small-town America; their use of adult characters as kid stand-ins; their celebration of mild ironies; and their pleasure in language (“You must be firm and resolute, particularly with mice. You must brook them no quarter”)—are a welcome addition to a time-honored tradition of children’s writing. sarah ellis

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Baby Lincoln has grown tired of living under the constant direction of her older sister Eugenia and has finally said enough is enough. Planning a “necessary journey,” she packs her suitcase, complete with a library book, and heads to the train station. Fans of DiCamillo’s “Mercy Watson” series will recognize Baby Lincoln and her home on Deckawoo Drive, while new readers will easily jump into this tale of sibling frustration. Students unfamiliar with Baby will be in hysterics to see that, despite her name, she’s an older lady, complete with gray hair and wrinkles. Those who have bossy older (or younger) siblings will immediately connect with Baby as she sets off to experience life without the direction of her older sister. Baby makes new friends (like George, a young boy scared of wolf attacks) and discoveries (learning she enjoys comics and jelly beans) and ultimately finds herself missing her sister and wanting to return home. VERDICT Lending itself well to classroom read-alouds and discussions, and independent and bedtime reading, this title is most certainly a recommended purchase for those serving a young elementary age range.—Shana Morales, Windsor Public Library, CT

Horn Book

DiCamillo continues the relay of Tales from Deckawoo Drive, as minor characters from previous books (Leroy Ninker Saddles Up, rev. 9/14; Francine Poulet Meets the Ghost Racoon, rev. 9/15) grab the baton for their own stories. In this third series entry, the Lincoln sisters, a pair we met in the Mercy Watson books (of which this series is a spinoff), take center stage. Eugenia Lincoln is hard-nosed, tyrannical, and humorless. Lucille Lincoln, known as Baby, is soft-hearted, timid, and oppressed. The story kicks off as Baby accesses just enough gumption to take a train trip by herself. In the course of this journey she makes friends and gains self-confidence, and when she returns home, Eugenia unbends enough to admit that she missed her. It ends with buttered toast, love, and a cameo appearance by Mercy Watson the pig. A generous helping of full-page and spot illustrations adds to the energy and to our understanding of the characters. These stories—with their portrait of timeless small-town America; their use of adult characters as kid stand-ins; their celebration of mild ironies; and their pleasure in language (“You must be firm and resolute, particularly with mice. You must brook them no quarter”)—are a welcome addition to a time-honored tradition of children’s writing. sarah ellis

Grades 2-4
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