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The Tale of Angelino Brown



by
David Almond
illustrated by
Alex T. Smith

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Candlewick
Imprint
Candlewick
ISBN
9780763695637
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$6.00   $5.00
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QTY

In this hilarious yet touching story, life takes a surprising turn after a bus driver finds a tiny boy angel in his pocket.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

272

Trim Size

7 3/4" x 5"

Dewey

F

AR

3.8: points 5

Lexile

550L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

9

JLG Release

Jul 2018

Book Genres


Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books*, Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

Bert and Betty Brown are tired of their humdrum lives; Bert drives a bus, Betty cooks for schoolchildren, and the couple is still grieving the loss of their young son. But all this changes when Bert discovers a tiny, innocent boy-angel in his shirt pocket and takes him home. The angel, whom they name Angelino, creates joy and chaos in a struggling school and is angel-napped by a young man named Kevin trying to prove himself a villain. Kevin’s attempts at dastardly deeds and the ensuing rescue mission provide a handy plot structure, while queries about the angel’s existence gently raise larger theological questions. This charming story weaves slapstick humor and fart jokes with passages of surprising beauty and depth, hinting at darker troubles without sacrificing child-appropriate levity. The ensemble of plucky schoolchildren and bumbling adults is somewhat forgettable, but the book’s evocative tone resonates more than the story line would indicate. VERDICT A quirky addition to middle grade shelves.—Kyle Lukoff, Corlears School, New York City

Horn Book

Almond’s assured, energetic storytelling is in full force in this wonderfully outlandish, funny story of an angel come to earth. When Bert the bus driver feels a fluttering around his chest, he thinks he’s having a heart attack. But no: it’s an angel in his pocket, a tiny boy angel with (as seen in Smith’s frequent pencil illustrations) a topknot of curly hair and a penchant for mini gumdrops and farting. Bert and his wife Betty, the cook at St. Mungo’s School, care for the angel as their own and name him Angelino. At school the students love him, even though all he has to say for himself is, “I don’t know nowt” and “I don’t know who I am.” Then he’s spotted and kidnapped by young criminal K, whose villainous Boss thinks an angel will sell for millions on the black market, and the race is on. This is a rumbustious mix of over-the-top villains, cheeky giggles, and investigations into the nature of angels, faith, and heroism—as well as being a spirited school story. At its heart, it celebrates messy, inspired, and accidental human-ness, whether in tiny angels, lads “daft as a brush,” unconventional art teachers, or ordinary children. The homey, vividly evoked British setting (pints in the pub, telly watching, even the ever-enticing cake and custard) and use of regional diction are part of what gives the tale its appeal, along with Almond’s wit, tenderness, and sheer imaginative nuttiness. deirdre f. baker

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Bert and Betty Brown are tired of their humdrum lives; Bert drives a bus, Betty cooks for schoolchildren, and the couple is still grieving the loss of their young son. But all this changes when Bert discovers a tiny, innocent boy-angel in his shirt pocket and takes him home. The angel, whom they name Angelino, creates joy and chaos in a struggling school and is angel-napped by a young man named Kevin trying to prove himself a villain. Kevin’s attempts at dastardly deeds and the ensuing rescue mission provide a handy plot structure, while queries about the angel’s existence gently raise larger theological questions. This charming story weaves slapstick humor and fart jokes with passages of surprising beauty and depth, hinting at darker troubles without sacrificing child-appropriate levity. The ensemble of plucky schoolchildren and bumbling adults is somewhat forgettable, but the book’s evocative tone resonates more than the story line would indicate. VERDICT A quirky addition to middle grade shelves.—Kyle Lukoff, Corlears School, New York City

Horn Book

Almond’s assured, energetic storytelling is in full force in this wonderfully outlandish, funny story of an angel come to earth. When Bert the bus driver feels a fluttering around his chest, he thinks he’s having a heart attack. But no: it’s an angel in his pocket, a tiny boy angel with (as seen in Smith’s frequent pencil illustrations) a topknot of curly hair and a penchant for mini gumdrops and farting. Bert and his wife Betty, the cook at St. Mungo’s School, care for the angel as their own and name him Angelino. At school the students love him, even though all he has to say for himself is, “I don’t know nowt” and “I don’t know who I am.” Then he’s spotted and kidnapped by young criminal K, whose villainous Boss thinks an angel will sell for millions on the black market, and the race is on. This is a rumbustious mix of over-the-top villains, cheeky giggles, and investigations into the nature of angels, faith, and heroism—as well as being a spirited school story. At its heart, it celebrates messy, inspired, and accidental human-ness, whether in tiny angels, lads “daft as a brush,” unconventional art teachers, or ordinary children. The homey, vividly evoked British setting (pints in the pub, telly watching, even the ever-enticing cake and custard) and use of regional diction are part of what gives the tale its appeal, along with Almond’s wit, tenderness, and sheer imaginative nuttiness. deirdre f. baker

Grades 3-5
Intermediate Readers
For Grades 3-5

A wide variety of novels and accessible nonfiction for younger elementary readers who love a good story comprise this category of 12 books per year. The focus in these titles is primarily on the text, though some novels may feature illustration.

12 books per Year
$195.60 per Year
Interests
Chapter Books,Fiction,Transitional Readers
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Grades 3-5
Intermediate Readers
12 books per Year
$195.60 per Year

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