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Operation Bunny: Wings & Co., The First Case


Series
Wings & Co

by
Sally Gardner
illustrated by
David Roberts

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Macmillan
Imprint
Henry Holt
ISBN
9780805098921

Awards and Honors
Amazon.com Best Books of the Year 2014, Ages 6–8: PW’s Best Books of 2014, Middle Grade; New York Public Library, 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing 2014, Stories for Older Readers
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Violence: Child Abuse
$12.00   $5.00
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QTY
Out of stock

Series: Wings & Co., Book 1
After inheriting a fairy detective agency, Emily escapes her cruel adoptive parents with the help of a talking cat. A soul-stealing witch is hot on their heels. Black-and-white illustrations.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Violence: Child Abuse

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

192

Trim Size

5" x 7 3/4"

Dewey

F

AR

4.8: points 3

Lexile

700L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

7

JLG Release

May 2014

Book Genres


Topics

Magic. Foundlings. Cats. Fairies. Witches. Adoption. Mystery and detective stories.

Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

Emily Vole, abandoned by her birth parents, is taken in by a horrid pair of yuppies who aren’t able to have children. Or so they think, until triplets come along. Once the shallow Dashwoods have children of their own, they treat Emily like a servant. She finds refuge by visiting Miss String, an eccentric neighbor who has more than a few secrets up her sleeve, including a bipedal talking cat. Fidget’s existence is Emily’s first hint that magic is real. Sure enough, she discovers that she, too, has special powers—a revelation that kicks off a whirlwind journey through the strife-ridden underbelly of London. Emily and her cohorts must keep certain objects out of the hands of the villainous witch Harpella, who wants to use them to steal souls and obliterate fairies. Though this book purports to be the first case of the Wings and Co. Detective agency, it’s not really a mystery. Readers know who the villain is all along. The adventure is in seeing how Emily defeats her. But following Emily’s journey is somewhat of a challenge. Children will have to read the novel closely in order to pick up on characters’ motivations and to keep track of past events that caused the current state of affairs. Even so, it should appeal to readers who enjoy whimsy without a lot of stressful conflict. Highlights are the charming Briticisms as well as the merry, slightly off-kilter black-and-white illustrations—especially the depiction of Harpella, who resembles a pointier, more deranged version of Lady Gaga.—Amy Holland, Irondequoit Public Library, NY

Horn Book

Abandoned in a hatbox at Stansted Airport, infant Emily Vole is impulsively adopted by Daisy and Ronald Dashwood, deliciously nasty literary cousins to Roald Dahl’s Wormwoods. After the birth of their own triplets, the Dashwoods demote Emily to Cinderella status, forcing her to work as their nanny and housekeeper and to sleep on the ironing board in the laundry room. Fortunately, when Emily is nearly nine, an elderly neighbor, Miss String, and her large talking cat, Fidget, change everything. Soon the stalwart Emily is neck-deep in magical doings—figuring out her new role as the Keeper of the Keys (a lively sentient bunch), tracking down a mysterious shop she has inherited, and thwarting a witch who turns people into unlikely-hued rabbits. And speaking of transformed rabbits, Roberts captures perfectly their nose-twitching confusion as well as Emily’s wide-eyed awe and more in a profusion of black-and-white full-page and spot-art illustrations. While reaching a satisfying conclusion, this first brisk, entertaining series entry leaves enough dangling threads to make readers eager for the next. monica edinger

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Emily Vole, abandoned by her birth parents, is taken in by a horrid pair of yuppies who aren’t able to have children. Or so they think, until triplets come along. Once the shallow Dashwoods have children of their own, they treat Emily like a servant. She finds refuge by visiting Miss String, an eccentric neighbor who has more than a few secrets up her sleeve, including a bipedal talking cat. Fidget’s existence is Emily’s first hint that magic is real. Sure enough, she discovers that she, too, has special powers—a revelation that kicks off a whirlwind journey through the strife-ridden underbelly of London. Emily and her cohorts must keep certain objects out of the hands of the villainous witch Harpella, who wants to use them to steal souls and obliterate fairies. Though this book purports to be the first case of the Wings and Co. Detective agency, it’s not really a mystery. Readers know who the villain is all along. The adventure is in seeing how Emily defeats her. But following Emily’s journey is somewhat of a challenge. Children will have to read the novel closely in order to pick up on characters’ motivations and to keep track of past events that caused the current state of affairs. Even so, it should appeal to readers who enjoy whimsy without a lot of stressful conflict. Highlights are the charming Briticisms as well as the merry, slightly off-kilter black-and-white illustrations—especially the depiction of Harpella, who resembles a pointier, more deranged version of Lady Gaga.—Amy Holland, Irondequoit Public Library, NY

Horn Book

Abandoned in a hatbox at Stansted Airport, infant Emily Vole is impulsively adopted by Daisy and Ronald Dashwood, deliciously nasty literary cousins to Roald Dahl’s Wormwoods. After the birth of their own triplets, the Dashwoods demote Emily to Cinderella status, forcing her to work as their nanny and housekeeper and to sleep on the ironing board in the laundry room. Fortunately, when Emily is nearly nine, an elderly neighbor, Miss String, and her large talking cat, Fidget, change everything. Soon the stalwart Emily is neck-deep in magical doings—figuring out her new role as the Keeper of the Keys (a lively sentient bunch), tracking down a mysterious shop she has inherited, and thwarting a witch who turns people into unlikely-hued rabbits. And speaking of transformed rabbits, Roberts captures perfectly their nose-twitching confusion as well as Emily’s wide-eyed awe and more in a profusion of black-and-white full-page and spot-art illustrations. While reaching a satisfying conclusion, this first brisk, entertaining series entry leaves enough dangling threads to make readers eager for the next. monica edinger

Grades 3-5
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A wide variety of novels and accessible nonfiction for younger elementary readers who love a good story comprise this category of 12 books per year. The focus in these titles is primarily on the text, though some novels may feature illustration.

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Interests
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