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Susan Marcus Bends the Rules



None
Jane Cutler

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Holiday House
Imprint
Holiday House
ISBN
9780823430475
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Discrimination: Reference/Discussion
$12.00   $5.00
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QTY
Out of stock

“Buses and streetcars are not Jim Crowed in St. Louis. Or in Missouri, either . . . we wouldn’t be breaking any law. We would just be doing things differently from how they’re done.”

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Discrimination: Reference/Discussion

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

112

Trim Size

5 1/2" x 8 1/4"

Dewey

Fic

AR

5: points 4

Lexile

880L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

8

JLG Release

Jul 2014

Book Genres


Topics

Friendship. Prejudices. Toleration. Family life. African Americans. Moving a household. Missouri.

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Booklist, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

In 1943, the summer before she begins fifth grade, Susan Marcus’s family moves from New York City to St. Louis. At first, the avid Yankee fan is apprehensive about relocating to Cardinals country and being able to understand the accents of her new neighbors. She is also surprised to find that in Missouri her family won’t need to put up blackout curtains or volunteer for the air-raid watch. Susan encounters prejudice toward Jews, Japanese, African Americans, and even New Yorkers for the first time. Disgusted with Jim Crow laws that keep her from being able to go to the swimming pool or movie theater with her African American friend Loretta, Susan cooks up a plan to push the limits of the laws. The novel splendidly captures the place and time, from the heat and humidity (and lack of air conditioning), to childhood pastimes like roller skating, playing jacks, and drinking Kool Aid. Facts about the era are smoothly integrated into the story. However, due to the lengthy descriptions, the plot is slow to get moving, and most of the action takes place in the latter half of the novel. Although the author uses the terminology of the time to describe race (Japanese are referred to as Japs, Africans Americans as colored), the story is a gentler read than Mildred Taylor’s Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry (Dial, 1976). Children will cheer for Susan’s courage in defying the injustice in her world.—Jackie Partch, Multnomah County Library, Portland, OR

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

In 1943, the summer before she begins fifth grade, Susan Marcus’s family moves from New York City to St. Louis. At first, the avid Yankee fan is apprehensive about relocating to Cardinals country and being able to understand the accents of her new neighbors. She is also surprised to find that in Missouri her family won’t need to put up blackout curtains or volunteer for the air-raid watch. Susan encounters prejudice toward Jews, Japanese, African Americans, and even New Yorkers for the first time. Disgusted with Jim Crow laws that keep her from being able to go to the swimming pool or movie theater with her African American friend Loretta, Susan cooks up a plan to push the limits of the laws. The novel splendidly captures the place and time, from the heat and humidity (and lack of air conditioning), to childhood pastimes like roller skating, playing jacks, and drinking Kool Aid. Facts about the era are smoothly integrated into the story. However, due to the lengthy descriptions, the plot is slow to get moving, and most of the action takes place in the latter half of the novel. Although the author uses the terminology of the time to describe race (Japanese are referred to as Japs, Africans Americans as colored), the story is a gentler read than Mildred Taylor’s Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry (Dial, 1976). Children will cheer for Susan’s courage in defying the injustice in her world.—Jackie Partch, Multnomah County Library, Portland, OR

Grades 3-5
Intermediate Readers
For Grades 3-5

A wide variety of novels and accessible nonfiction for younger elementary readers who love a good story comprise this category of 12 books per year. The focus in these titles is primarily on the text, though some novels may feature illustration.

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Intermediate Readers
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