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The Conductor



by
Laëtitia Devernay

Edition
-
Publisher
Chronicle Books
Imprint
Chronicle
ISBN
9781452104911
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$12.00   $5.00
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

Easy Reading Plus

Atop a tree in the midst of a forest, a man wordlessly conducts a symphony in which leaves take the form of birds and soar into the air. Full-color illustrations.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

72

Trim Size

5 1/2" x 12 3/4"

Dewey

F

AR

0: points 0

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Nov 2011

Topics

Conductors. Trees. Music. Birds.

Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

School Library Journal

Junior Library Guild

  • This visually powerful story evokes the feel of music and is a distinctive example of the possibilities of wordless books.
  • In her delicate, subtly colored illustrations, Laëtitia Devernay uses white space and repeating patterns to convey a dramatic sense of motion.
  • The unexpected ending will make readers want to flip back for another look.
  • May facilitate discussion on interpreting art and music and how different creative mediums can nourish one another.

School Library Journal

This uplifting wordless title is a visual delight. The opening endpapers hint at the double meanings to emerge as the story unfolds. Tall strips of yellow, each of which bear five wavy, inked lines, follow the book’s vertical orientation, prefiguring the design of the tree trunks to come; when the book is turned horizontally, the units resemble musical staves. The conductor enters the forest and climbs into a world created with a controlled, three-color palette; each tree has its own personality. The foliage, ranging from a deep, dense green to a light, airy yellow, comes to life when the baton is lifted. At first a single leaf, transforming into a bird, lifts off, leaving a clearly defined negative space. Soon the other trees raise their voices, and the rhythmic patterns on the page create a glorious harmony. What an opportunity to experience and then discuss the way an orchestral piece works in terms of the opening melodic line (which reappears, as some patterns do here) or the effect of a solo instrument as compared to the full symphonic sound—a sensation beautifully rendered when the white space is covered with fluttering shapes of every type. In a surprising and magical conclusion, as the leaf-birds return, the conductor plants the baton: roots and shoots spring forth. Pair this title with Suzy Lee’s books to explore wondrous relationships between people and their environments. Children may be inspired to improvise an accompaniment.—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library

Praise & Reviews

Junior Library Guild

  • This visually powerful story evokes the feel of music and is a distinctive example of the possibilities of wordless books.
  • In her delicate, subtly colored illustrations, Laëtitia Devernay uses white space and repeating patterns to convey a dramatic sense of motion.
  • The unexpected ending will make readers want to flip back for another look.
  • May facilitate discussion on interpreting art and music and how different creative mediums can nourish one another.

School Library Journal

This uplifting wordless title is a visual delight. The opening endpapers hint at the double meanings to emerge as the story unfolds. Tall strips of yellow, each of which bear five wavy, inked lines, follow the book’s vertical orientation, prefiguring the design of the tree trunks to come; when the book is turned horizontally, the units resemble musical staves. The conductor enters the forest and climbs into a world created with a controlled, three-color palette; each tree has its own personality. The foliage, ranging from a deep, dense green to a light, airy yellow, comes to life when the baton is lifted. At first a single leaf, transforming into a bird, lifts off, leaving a clearly defined negative space. Soon the other trees raise their voices, and the rhythmic patterns on the page create a glorious harmony. What an opportunity to experience and then discuss the way an orchestral piece works in terms of the opening melodic line (which reappears, as some patterns do here) or the effect of a solo instrument as compared to the full symphonic sound—a sensation beautifully rendered when the white space is covered with fluttering shapes of every type. In a surprising and magical conclusion, as the leaf-birds return, the conductor plants the baton: roots and shoots spring forth. Pair this title with Suzy Lee’s books to explore wondrous relationships between people and their environments. Children may be inspired to improvise an accompaniment.—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library

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