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Wumbers



by
Amy Krouse Rosenthal
illustrated by
Tom Lichtenheld

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Chronicle Books
Imprint
Chronicle
ISBN
9781452110226
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$6.00   $5.00
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

Easy Reading Plus

Learn the ba6 of wumbers, words cre8ed with numbers! Don’t be frigh10ed. We promise you’ll find it s2pendous. Full-color illustrations created with ink and pastels.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

40

Trim Size

11" x 9"

Dewey

793.73

AR

0: points 0

Lexile

NP

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Sep 2012

Topics

Word games. Numbers. Words.

Standard MARC Records

Download Standard MARC Records

Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine, Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal

Junior Library Guild

  • Readers will be “el8ed” by this clever collection of “1derful” wordplays.
  • Each spread features different subject matter, from a boy napping with his dog (“pure con10tment”) to a girl playing the tuba (“2t!”), emphasizing that the opportunity for wumbers is everywhere.
  • The format of interchanging numbers for word syllables will challenge and inspire kids to make up their own wumbers.
  • Tom Lichtenheld’s expressive, playful artwork is half of the joke. In one spread, for example, a delighted-looking boy holding a red balloon floats up and away as a balloon salesman says to the boy’s mother, “4give me, 4 this is bel8ed, but it seems once again I have overinfl8ted.”

School Library Journal

Rosenthal and Lichtenheld team up again to craft an inspired picture book that encourages cre8tive wordplay. Starting on the endpapers with questions in speech bubbles (“What do you think you’ll be like as 18ager?”) and continuing through a series of conversations in double-page vignettes, Rosenthal cleverly combines words and numbers (“wumbers”) that challenge readers to use their number recognition and phonological skills. Once children grasp the “ba6,” they will have a “s2pendous” time figuring out the captions. From a boy and girl enjoying their “10ts” to the smiling child who is “el8ed” because he lost his first “2th,” Lichtenheld’s ink and pastel coloring-book-style drawings supply visual clues to decoding the text. Wumbers takes the concept behind text-messaging shorthand and repurposes it into an interactive read-aloud that both kids and grown-ups can enjoy.—Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT

Horn Book

The two kids and a dog on the cover spell things out for us in dialogue bubbles: “It’s a book!” “It’s a game!” “It’s words cre8ed with numbers!” So we’re prepared to decode the linguistic volley that begins on the endpapers and continues on the title page, right into the book itself, as double-page spreads show conversations between random characters speaking in “wumbers” (“Would you like some honey 2 swee10 your tea?” “Yes, that would be 1derful.”) This might strike young readers as more innovative if they weren’t already replacing syllables with numbers in their own texting, but the humor of Lichtenheld’s cartoon illustrations is likely to grab their attention. Exaggerated facial expressions deftly offer picture clues that will be even more fun to decode. There’s no real story here—each double-page spread is a self-contained scene, unrelated to the illustration that comes before or after it. In this respect, it’s more like a riddle book, a fact that also may add to its child appeal (though once the riddles have been solved there might not be much here to inspire a return trip). kathleen t. horning

Praise & Reviews

Junior Library Guild

  • Readers will be “el8ed” by this clever collection of “1derful” wordplays.
  • Each spread features different subject matter, from a boy napping with his dog (“pure con10tment”) to a girl playing the tuba (“2t!”), emphasizing that the opportunity for wumbers is everywhere.
  • The format of interchanging numbers for word syllables will challenge and inspire kids to make up their own wumbers.
  • Tom Lichtenheld’s expressive, playful artwork is half of the joke. In one spread, for example, a delighted-looking boy holding a red balloon floats up and away as a balloon salesman says to the boy’s mother, “4give me, 4 this is bel8ed, but it seems once again I have overinfl8ted.”

School Library Journal

Rosenthal and Lichtenheld team up again to craft an inspired picture book that encourages cre8tive wordplay. Starting on the endpapers with questions in speech bubbles (“What do you think you’ll be like as 18ager?”) and continuing through a series of conversations in double-page vignettes, Rosenthal cleverly combines words and numbers (“wumbers”) that challenge readers to use their number recognition and phonological skills. Once children grasp the “ba6,” they will have a “s2pendous” time figuring out the captions. From a boy and girl enjoying their “10ts” to the smiling child who is “el8ed” because he lost his first “2th,” Lichtenheld’s ink and pastel coloring-book-style drawings supply visual clues to decoding the text. Wumbers takes the concept behind text-messaging shorthand and repurposes it into an interactive read-aloud that both kids and grown-ups can enjoy.—Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT

Horn Book

The two kids and a dog on the cover spell things out for us in dialogue bubbles: “It’s a book!” “It’s a game!” “It’s words cre8ed with numbers!” So we’re prepared to decode the linguistic volley that begins on the endpapers and continues on the title page, right into the book itself, as double-page spreads show conversations between random characters speaking in “wumbers” (“Would you like some honey 2 swee10 your tea?” “Yes, that would be 1derful.”) This might strike young readers as more innovative if they weren’t already replacing syllables with numbers in their own texting, but the humor of Lichtenheld’s cartoon illustrations is likely to grab their attention. Exaggerated facial expressions deftly offer picture clues that will be even more fun to decode. There’s no real story here—each double-page spread is a self-contained scene, unrelated to the illustration that comes before or after it. In this respect, it’s more like a riddle book, a fact that also may add to its child appeal (though once the riddles have been solved there might not be much here to inspire a return trip). kathleen t. horning

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