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Patina


Series
Track

by
Jason Reynolds

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Simon & Schuster
Imprint
Atheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy
ISBN
9781481450188

Awards and Honors
Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children’s Book Award 2018—2019 Nominee ALSC Notable Children’s Books 2018, Older
ILA Teachers' Choices - 2018
YALSA 2018 Quick Pick for Reluctant Readers Selection
Booklist Top 10 Books for Youth 2017, Sports
School Library Journal’s Best Books of 2017, Middle Grade and Chapter Books
Horn Book Fanfare List 2017, Fiction
The New York TimesNotable Children’s Books of 2017, Middle Grade
Chicago Public Library Best Books of 2017, Fiction for Older Readers
Los Angeles Public Library Best of 2017: Teen Books
Fall 2017 Parents’ Choice Award, Fiction Approvedbr>
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
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$15.30   $12.75
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QTY
Out of stock

Ghost. Lu. Patina. Sunny. Four kids from wildly different backgrounds with personalities that are explosive when they clash. But they are also four kids chosen for an elite middle-school track team.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

192

Trim Size

5 1/2" x 8 1/4"

Dewey

F

AR

4.7: points 7

Lexile

710L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

11

JLG Release

Dec 2017

Book Genres


Topics

Running. Track and field. Stress. Family problems. Diabetes. African Americans.

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Booklist*, The Horn Book Magazine*, Kirkus Reviews*, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Twelve-year-old Patina Jones not only loves to run, she needs to run—and win. She’s a gifted athlete, and since the death of her father and her mother’s life-altering health problems, Patty’s track club has become the focal point of her life. Running helps her to navigate the changes she and her younger sister, Maddy, are experiencing. They have left their urban neighborhood to live in a different part of the city with their uncle Tony (who is black like Patty and Maddy) and their aunt Emily (who is white) and attend a new school, Chester Academy. In this follow-up to Ghost, the award-winning author continues to display his mastery of voice. Patty’s observations about her new classmates are pointed: “a whole bunch of rich girls whose daddies own stuff.” Over time, Patty begins to understand that her success depends on teamwork. Her changing views are sparked by two collaborative projects. One is based on the life of Frida Kahlo. Working with classmates, about whom she had formed erroneous assumptions, gives her opportunities to widen her perspective. The second and more central catalyst is being selected as a member of the 4x800 relay on her elite track team. With the encouragement of her loving family and supportive coaches, Patty ultimately becomes the anchor of her team, both on and off the track. Patty’s story is an invitation to grapple with the need to belong, socioeconomic status, and the dangers of jumping to conclusions. VERDICT This “second leg” of Reynolds’s series is as satisfying as its predecessor and a winning story on its own.—Shelley Sommer, Inly School, Scituate, MA

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
Back for the second leg of the Track series relay, the Defenders team has passed the baton to title character Patina, nicknamed Patty. First introduced to readers in Ghost (rev. 11/16), Patty has been forced to grow up quickly. After her father dies suddenly, Patty’s role in raising her younger sister Maddy grows larger as their mother gets ill and ultimately becomes a double amputee due to complications from diabetes. While moving in with their godparents, who have adopted them both, has relieved some of the pressure, Patty is not always certain how to relinquish her role as caregiver. She takes it upon herself to braid Maddy’s hair (as opposed to letting their adoptive mother, Momsy, do it) because “ain’t no rule book for white people to know how to work with black hair.” Patty pushes Ma in her wheelchair to and from church on Sundays. She does all the work on her group project at school, and angrily counts her second-place ribbon at a track meet as “fake.” At some point, Momsy reminds her, “Folks who try to do everything are usually avoiding one thing.” Those words ring true when an almost-tragedy strikes the household and Patty is forced to face the “thing”—the loss she feels at the death of her father—and start to trust others. For his first book featuring a female protagonist, Reynolds has done an excellent job of providing insights into the life of an African American middle schooler. Track scenes (and drama) are interspersed with home and school scenes (and drama); and as the new girl at an elite academy, Patty’s interactions with her vapid “hair-flipper” classmates, especially, are both humorous and authentic. eboni njoku

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Twelve-year-old Patina Jones not only loves to run, she needs to run—and win. She’s a gifted athlete, and since the death of her father and her mother’s life-altering health problems, Patty’s track club has become the focal point of her life. Running helps her to navigate the changes she and her younger sister, Maddy, are experiencing. They have left their urban neighborhood to live in a different part of the city with their uncle Tony (who is black like Patty and Maddy) and their aunt Emily (who is white) and attend a new school, Chester Academy. In this follow-up to Ghost, the award-winning author continues to display his mastery of voice. Patty’s observations about her new classmates are pointed: “a whole bunch of rich girls whose daddies own stuff.” Over time, Patty begins to understand that her success depends on teamwork. Her changing views are sparked by two collaborative projects. One is based on the life of Frida Kahlo. Working with classmates, about whom she had formed erroneous assumptions, gives her opportunities to widen her perspective. The second and more central catalyst is being selected as a member of the 4x800 relay on her elite track team. With the encouragement of her loving family and supportive coaches, Patty ultimately becomes the anchor of her team, both on and off the track. Patty’s story is an invitation to grapple with the need to belong, socioeconomic status, and the dangers of jumping to conclusions. VERDICT This “second leg” of Reynolds’s series is as satisfying as its predecessor and a winning story on its own.—Shelley Sommer, Inly School, Scituate, MA

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
Back for the second leg of the Track series relay, the Defenders team has passed the baton to title character Patina, nicknamed Patty. First introduced to readers in Ghost (rev. 11/16), Patty has been forced to grow up quickly. After her father dies suddenly, Patty’s role in raising her younger sister Maddy grows larger as their mother gets ill and ultimately becomes a double amputee due to complications from diabetes. While moving in with their godparents, who have adopted them both, has relieved some of the pressure, Patty is not always certain how to relinquish her role as caregiver. She takes it upon herself to braid Maddy’s hair (as opposed to letting their adoptive mother, Momsy, do it) because “ain’t no rule book for white people to know how to work with black hair.” Patty pushes Ma in her wheelchair to and from church on Sundays. She does all the work on her group project at school, and angrily counts her second-place ribbon at a track meet as “fake.” At some point, Momsy reminds her, “Folks who try to do everything are usually avoiding one thing.” Those words ring true when an almost-tragedy strikes the household and Patty is forced to face the “thing”—the loss she feels at the death of her father—and start to trust others. For his first book featuring a female protagonist, Reynolds has done an excellent job of providing insights into the life of an African American middle schooler. Track scenes (and drama) are interspersed with home and school scenes (and drama); and as the new girl at an elite academy, Patty’s interactions with her vapid “hair-flipper” classmates, especially, are both humorous and authentic. eboni njoku

Grades 5-8
Sports Middle Plus
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Interests
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