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Take Away the A



by
Michaël Escoffier
illustrated by
Kris Di Giacomo

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Enchanted Lion
Imprint
Enchanted Lion
ISBN
9781592701568

Awards and Honors
Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2014, Picture Book; PW’s Best Books of 2014, Picture Books; ALA Notable Books for Children 2015, All Ages; 2015 CLA Notable Children’s Books in the English Language Arts; Bulletin Blue Ribbon 2015, Picture Books
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$6.00   $5.00
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QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

Easy Reading Plus

In this alphabet book, subtracting a letter from each word leads to scenarios such as a monster winning first prize for “Scariest & Hairiest”: “Without the A, the BEAST is the BEST!” Full-color illustrations.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

56

Trim Size

8 1/4" x 11 3/4"

Dewey

428/.1

AR

0: points 0

Lexile

AD200L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Dec 2014

Book Genres


Topics

Vocabulary. Plays on words. Comparative and general grammar. Word formation. The alphabet.

Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal

Junior Library Guild

  • A fresh and clever alphabet book. Starting with A, the letter is removed from a word, and each spread shows the results. “Without the C,” for example, “the CHAIR has HAIR.” “Without the K, the MONKEY makes MONEY.” And “without the N, the MOON says MOO!”
  • Kris Di Giacomo’s illustrations add another level of wit and whimsy to Michaël Escoffier’s word shenanigans. For instance, dice, as ice, chill poker players’ drinks. For G, a glove falls in love—and scurries to a crosswalk after his paramour, an octopus.
  • The silly situations and fun details (almost all the characters are either animals or inanimate objects, and a mouse reappears in many of the illustrations), invite readers to linger over the artwork.
  • Sure to inspire children to craft their own word pairings: craft and raft? Pair and air? The possibilities are endless!

School Library Journal

This is a clever and engaging “alphabeast of a book” for children capable of basic word recognition. The premise is that less is indeed more, as Escoffier moves through the alphabet, and removes a letter on each spread. Taking away an “A,” “B,” or “C,” etc., transforms each highlighted word into a totally new one, and the wacky, almost surreal (plants wearing pants) images reinforce the humor and add to the literal wordplay. For example, “Without the D DICE are ICE” shows a wolf and a goose playing cards, while sipping umbrella drinks with ivory cubes inside. “Without the K the MONKEY makes MONEY” features a monkey ringing up sales on a cash register at his banana stand. Kids will have fun coming up with, and illustrating, reductive examples of their own. Inspired and instructive silliness.—Luann Toth, School Library Journal

Horn Book

Here’s a creative and sophisticated twist on the traditional alphabet book. Take a word (e.g., beast), remove one letter to make a new word (best), and imagine a scene that incorporates both words: “Without the A / the BEAST is the BEST.” What elevates this concept beyond neat parlor trick are Di Giacomo’s outside-the-box illustrations, which cleverly interpret the word pairings in unexpected ways. For “the GLOVE falls in LOVE,” a smitten brown glove walking on its fingers follows a blushing brown octopus (five arms are visible) across the street. In “the FARM is too FAR,” a wolf with a toothy grin offers a ride to a hitchhiking pig and chicken. As in this French picture-book team’s previous collaborations (Brief Thief, rev. 7/13; The Day I Lost My Superpowers, rev. 7/14), text and art play effortlessly off each other to enhance humor and meaning. Each double-page spread is dedicated to one letter and discrete episode. Although the scenes aren’t connected, a few recurring animal characters do pop up throughout the book, making repeat readings more satisfying. The idea peters out before the end, but the entertaining journey may inspire kids to come up with their own inventive word pairings. kitty flynn

Praise & Reviews

Junior Library Guild

  • A fresh and clever alphabet book. Starting with A, the letter is removed from a word, and each spread shows the results. “Without the C,” for example, “the CHAIR has HAIR.” “Without the K, the MONKEY makes MONEY.” And “without the N, the MOON says MOO!”
  • Kris Di Giacomo’s illustrations add another level of wit and whimsy to Michaël Escoffier’s word shenanigans. For instance, dice, as ice, chill poker players’ drinks. For G, a glove falls in love—and scurries to a crosswalk after his paramour, an octopus.
  • The silly situations and fun details (almost all the characters are either animals or inanimate objects, and a mouse reappears in many of the illustrations), invite readers to linger over the artwork.
  • Sure to inspire children to craft their own word pairings: craft and raft? Pair and air? The possibilities are endless!

School Library Journal

This is a clever and engaging “alphabeast of a book” for children capable of basic word recognition. The premise is that less is indeed more, as Escoffier moves through the alphabet, and removes a letter on each spread. Taking away an “A,” “B,” or “C,” etc., transforms each highlighted word into a totally new one, and the wacky, almost surreal (plants wearing pants) images reinforce the humor and add to the literal wordplay. For example, “Without the D DICE are ICE” shows a wolf and a goose playing cards, while sipping umbrella drinks with ivory cubes inside. “Without the K the MONKEY makes MONEY” features a monkey ringing up sales on a cash register at his banana stand. Kids will have fun coming up with, and illustrating, reductive examples of their own. Inspired and instructive silliness.—Luann Toth, School Library Journal

Horn Book

Here’s a creative and sophisticated twist on the traditional alphabet book. Take a word (e.g., beast), remove one letter to make a new word (best), and imagine a scene that incorporates both words: “Without the A / the BEAST is the BEST.” What elevates this concept beyond neat parlor trick are Di Giacomo’s outside-the-box illustrations, which cleverly interpret the word pairings in unexpected ways. For “the GLOVE falls in LOVE,” a smitten brown glove walking on its fingers follows a blushing brown octopus (five arms are visible) across the street. In “the FARM is too FAR,” a wolf with a toothy grin offers a ride to a hitchhiking pig and chicken. As in this French picture-book team’s previous collaborations (Brief Thief, rev. 7/13; The Day I Lost My Superpowers, rev. 7/14), text and art play effortlessly off each other to enhance humor and meaning. Each double-page spread is dedicated to one letter and discrete episode. Although the scenes aren’t connected, a few recurring animal characters do pop up throughout the book, making repeat readings more satisfying. The idea peters out before the end, but the entertaining journey may inspire kids to come up with their own inventive word pairings. kitty flynn

Grades 1-3
Easy Reading Plus
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Interests
Beginning Readers,Chapter Books,Fiction,Picture Books
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