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The Hero of Little Street



by
Gregory Rogers

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Roaring Brook
Imprint
Neal Porter
ISBN
9781596437296
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$12.00   $5.00
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

Easy Reading Plus

In this wordless tale, a boy, hiding from bullies in a museum, follows a dog into a Vermeer painting. Then, in seventeenth-century Holland, the real trouble begins. Full-color illustrations.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

32

Trim Size

9" x 12"

Dewey

E

AR

0: points 0

Lexile

NP

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Jun 2012

Topics

Dogs. Painting. Time travel. London, England. Delft, Netherlands. Seventeenth-century Netherlands history. Stories without words.

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine*, Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Rogers’s third wordless book features the young hero from The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard (Roaring Brook, 2004). His first escapade occurs in modern-day London near the National Gallery. It involves a soccer ball, a fountain, and a flight from bullies. Fans of the previous titles will recognize familiar characters cleverly incorporated into the art when the protagonist seeks refuge inside the museum. Befriended by the dog in Van Eyck’s Arnolfini Wedding Portrait, the youngster follows him into Vermeer’s A Lady Seated at a Virginal. After enjoying a musical interlude and a gift that later proves useful back in the real world, the twosome exit into Vermeer’s The Little Street, ultimately encountering a canine-caging butcher in 17th-century Holland. Rogers’s visual narrative is both an aesthetic treat and masterful storytelling. Small panels with minimal detail, often on white, focus the eye on motivations, causes, and sequential action. Larger frames, full-page bleeds, and a single, glorious spread generally show consequences—a slowing of activity, allowing viewers to take in the Old World charm of the majestic halls, paintings, and Delft cityscapes—all rendered in watercolor and ink and shown from varying perspectives. The scenes are frequently humorous, as when all of the rescued dogs crowd around the virginal. This rare combination of action-packed fun and fine art yields new discoveries with each reading and is sure to create fond memories for future students of Art 101.—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
The same bulb-headed boy who was chased through Elizabethan London in The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard (rev. 11/04) is time-traveling again, this time to seventeenth-century Delft, an important center of the Dutch art world. As with the earlier wordless book, this one involves a lot of childlike mischief and chasing. When the boy runs into the National Gallery in London to escape some bullies, he encounters Jan van Eyck’s masterpiece The Arnolfini Marriage. The dog in the painting jumps out of the frame, and he and the boy romp through the gallery until they find a piece of sheet music on the floor misplaced by Vermeer’s Lady Seated at a Virginal. Dog and boy enter into her painting to return the music then head out her door onto Vermeer’s The Little Street in Delft. A spirited chase takes them back to the Lady’s house, then back to the National Gallery. Fast-paced action in the sequential art will inspire readers to rush through the story, but there’s a lot that warrants a return trip at a more leisurely pace. The particulars of seventeenth-century Dutch town life, for example, recall some of Anno’s early wordless books in their level of meticulous detail, and astute fans of Rogers’s previous book will find humorous references to the bear, the baron, and the bard. A superb, witty book that will appeal both to squirmy, clueless kids and educated art connoisseurs.

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Rogers’s third wordless book features the young hero from The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard (Roaring Brook, 2004). His first escapade occurs in modern-day London near the National Gallery. It involves a soccer ball, a fountain, and a flight from bullies. Fans of the previous titles will recognize familiar characters cleverly incorporated into the art when the protagonist seeks refuge inside the museum. Befriended by the dog in Van Eyck’s Arnolfini Wedding Portrait, the youngster follows him into Vermeer’s A Lady Seated at a Virginal. After enjoying a musical interlude and a gift that later proves useful back in the real world, the twosome exit into Vermeer’s The Little Street, ultimately encountering a canine-caging butcher in 17th-century Holland. Rogers’s visual narrative is both an aesthetic treat and masterful storytelling. Small panels with minimal detail, often on white, focus the eye on motivations, causes, and sequential action. Larger frames, full-page bleeds, and a single, glorious spread generally show consequences—a slowing of activity, allowing viewers to take in the Old World charm of the majestic halls, paintings, and Delft cityscapes—all rendered in watercolor and ink and shown from varying perspectives. The scenes are frequently humorous, as when all of the rescued dogs crowd around the virginal. This rare combination of action-packed fun and fine art yields new discoveries with each reading and is sure to create fond memories for future students of Art 101.—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
The same bulb-headed boy who was chased through Elizabethan London in The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard (rev. 11/04) is time-traveling again, this time to seventeenth-century Delft, an important center of the Dutch art world. As with the earlier wordless book, this one involves a lot of childlike mischief and chasing. When the boy runs into the National Gallery in London to escape some bullies, he encounters Jan van Eyck’s masterpiece The Arnolfini Marriage. The dog in the painting jumps out of the frame, and he and the boy romp through the gallery until they find a piece of sheet music on the floor misplaced by Vermeer’s Lady Seated at a Virginal. Dog and boy enter into her painting to return the music then head out her door onto Vermeer’s The Little Street in Delft. A spirited chase takes them back to the Lady’s house, then back to the National Gallery. Fast-paced action in the sequential art will inspire readers to rush through the story, but there’s a lot that warrants a return trip at a more leisurely pace. The particulars of seventeenth-century Dutch town life, for example, recall some of Anno’s early wordless books in their level of meticulous detail, and astute fans of Rogers’s previous book will find humorous references to the bear, the baron, and the bard. A superb, witty book that will appeal both to squirmy, clueless kids and educated art connoisseurs.

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