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Lenny & Lucy

By: Philip C. Stead

Illustrator: Erin E. Stead

Peter creates Lenny, a life-sized doll, to guard the bridge from the “dark, unfriendly” woods outside his home. But when night falls, Peter can’t sleep. What if Lenny is lonely? Full-color illustrations created with carbon transfer printing, egg tempera, and charcoal.

ISBN: 9781596439320

JLG Release: Jan 2016


Sensitive Areas: None
Topics: Moving households , Friendship , Woods , Fear , Imagination , Creativity , Resilience

$12.00   $5.00 Member Price

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Awards & Honors

Publishers Weekly Best Children’s Books of 2015, Picture Books
SLJ’s Best Books of 2015, Picture Books
Kirkus Reviews Best Children’s Books of 2015, Picture Books
Amazon.com Best Books of the Year 2015, Ages 3–5, Top 20
ALA Notable Books for Children 2016, Younger Readers
New York Public Library’s 100 Notable Titles for Reading and Sharing 2015, Children’s Books
2016 CCBC Choices– Picture Books forSchool-Age Children
2015 Cybils Award Nomination, Fiction Picture Books
Parents’ Choice Awards, Picture Books Gold, Spring 2016
Triple Crown National Book Award 2016-2017

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Peter and his dog Harold are unhappy to find themselves on a journey with their dad through the dark woods on their way to a new home. Peter thinks the move is a terrible idea and if Harold weren’t a dog, even he would do something about it. However, the decision has been made and Peter strongly dislikes the ominou
[STARRED REVIEW]
Peter and his dog Harold are unhappy to find themselves on a journey with their dad through the dark woods on their way to a new home. Peter thinks the move is a terrible idea and if Harold weren’t a dog, even he would do something about it. However, the decision has been made and Peter strongly dislikes the ominous looking trees that sit waiting darkly across the wooden bridge by the new house. The woods could be filled with terrible creatures. That first night, Peter and Harold cannot sleep. The next day, Peter takes action by creating a watchman, Lenny, out of pillows and blankets to guard the bridge. This is better, but something is still not quite right. Lenny needs a friend. So Peter and Harold create Lucy and the four become fast friends, making the home by the woods not so bad after all. Then they welcome Millie, who lives next door and likes looking for owls. This timeless story of a boy using his imagination to cope with loss and acclimate to a new environment is sure to draw in readers of all ages. The text is wonderfully imaginative and the mysterious nature of the woods lends feelings of excitement and intrigue. The illustrations perfectly match the mood of the tale, with the backgrounds created in cold grayscale and the characters popping to life with warm oranges, greens, and blues. VERDICT A wonderfully creative story of resilience and friendship.—Amy Shepherd, St. Anne’s Episcopal School, Middleton, DE

Horn Book

Peter isn’t optimistic about moving to a house in the woods with his father and faithful dog. An artfully restrained text never explains why they’ve moved, but there’s a sense of melancholy in the father’s stance and in the woods’ bareness. As protection again the “unfriendly” forest, Peter fashions the epo Peter isn’t optimistic about moving to a house in the woods with his father and faithful dog. An artfully restrained text never explains why they’ve moved, but there’s a sense of melancholy in the father’s stance and in the woods’ bareness. As protection again the “unfriendly” forest, Peter fashions the eponymous Lenny out of pillows, blankets, and string. Subtly evoking Sendak’s Mickey, Peter “pushed and pulled and kneaded the wrapped-up pillows like dough”; he then leaves Lenny to guard a nearby bridge to “keep the dark woods on the other side where they belong.” Although this makes Peter feel safer, he worries that Lenny is lonely, so he makes him a companion, Lucy. In the daytime, Lenny and Lucy watch over Peter’s solitary play, but something is missing. Enter Millie—the girl-next-door who becomes a good friend. In what may seem like a pacing misstep, her introduction is quite abrupt, but perhaps this is meant to signify how we sometimes overlook potential connections with others. Erin Stead’s art shows Millie’s mother befriending Peter’s dad, and cozy neighborliness overcomes the earlier pervasive loneliness (see the subtle shape of a heart in the final illustration). A controlled palette in the illustrations slowly adds color to the initial gray, employing highlights first of gold, then blue, green, and pink, to indicate a progressive sense of hope and comfort. Sublime bookmaking, including foil-stamped, cloth-bound boards, enhances the presentation of this gentle story. megan dowd lambert

Book Details

ISBN

9781596439320

First Release

January 2016

Genre

Fic

Dewey Classification

Trim Size

9 1/4" x 8 1/2"

Page Count

40

Accelerated Reader

Level 3.3; Points: 0.5;

Scholastic Reading Counts

Level 3.5; Points: 1;

Lexile

N/A

Format

Print Book

Edition

Hardcover edition

Publisher

Roaring Brook

Potentially Sensitive Areas

None

Topics

Moving households, Friendship, Woods, Fear, Imagination, Creativity, Resilience,

Standard MARC Record

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Cover Art

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