Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

A Life Made by Hand: The Story of Ruth Asawa

By: Andrea D'Aquino

Ruth Asawa (1926-2013) was an influential and award-winning sculptor, a beloved figure in the Bay Area art world, and a devoted activist who advocated tirelessly for arts education. This lushly illustrated book by collage artist Andrea D'Aquino brings Asawa's creative journey to life, detailing the influence of her childhood in a farming family, and her education at Black Mountain College where she pursued an experimental course of education with leading avant-garde artists and thinkers such as Anni and Josef Albers, Buckminster Fuller, Merce Cunningham, and Robert Rauschenberg. Delightful and substantial, this engaging title for young art lovers includes a page of teaching tools for parents and educators.

Author’s note. More about Ruth Asawa. Resources. Instructions to make a paper dragonfly. Full-color illustrations created with charcoal and colored pencil drawings combined with hand-painted and monoprinted paper.

ISBN: 9781616898366

JLG Release: Oct 2019


Sensitive Areas: None
Topics: Ruth Asawa (1926–2013) , US women sculptors , California , Biography , Art and artists , Japanese American sculptors , Black Mountain College , Nature and the natural world , Wire sculpture

$11.50  Member Price


Add to Wishlist

Like this book? Get more like it every month.

Arts Elementary Plus

Grades 2-6

14 titles/year

$245.70/year

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Publishers Weekly, Kirkus Reviews, School Library Journal, The Horn Book Magazine, Booklist

School Library Journal

In this picture book, author and illustrator D’Aquino tells the story of how Ruth Asawa became an artist. Raised in California, Asawa, along with her family, worked on a farm. Asawa was interested in nature and very good with her hands. She explored the shapes she observed in nature and began to re-create them out of wire and paper. On the weeken In this picture book, author and illustrator D’Aquino tells the story of how Ruth Asawa became an artist. Raised in California, Asawa, along with her family, worked on a farm. Asawa was interested in nature and very good with her hands. She explored the shapes she observed in nature and began to re-create them out of wire and paper. On the weekends, Asawa attended Japanese school, where she learned calligraphy. She went to Black Mountain College and later traveled to Mexico, where she learned to weave wire into baskets from a local craftsman. Asawa began weaving and never stopped, creating amazing structures that can be found in museums today. D’Aquino’s illustrations utilize charcoal, colored pencil, and collage with beautiful muted colors and whimsical designs. D’Aquino focuses on Asawa as an artist, but an author’s note discusses Asawa’s time in Japanese internment camps in the 1940s. The narrative focuses on Asawa’s voyage as an artist at the family’s bequest. Resources with more information are appended. D’Aquino also includes illustrated instructions on how to create a paper dragonfly, a great activity for storytime. Recommended for primary school libraries and children’s collections in public libraries. Also recommended for libraries with art collections.

Horn Book

D’Aquino offers young readers “the story of an artist you may have never heard of ”: Ruth Asawa (1926–2013), a Japanese American creator of nature-inspired wire sculptures. A third-person text effectively uses occasional imagined quota¬tions from young Ruth (“Hello Spider. How did you figure out how to make your web?”) to convey the se D’Aquino offers young readers “the story of an artist you may have never heard of ”: Ruth Asawa (1926–2013), a Japanese American creator of nature-inspired wire sculptures. A third-person text effectively uses occasional imagined quota¬tions from young Ruth (“Hello Spider. How did you figure out how to make your web?”) to convey the sense of curiosity and wonder at the natural world that would later define this artist. Throughout the narrative, there’s also an emphasis on the handmade—from a childhood spent on a farm (where “working with her hands was an ordinary thing to do”) to her studies at Black Mountain College (where instructor Josef Albers “taught students to make art out of everything around them”) to learning basket-weaving from a local craftsperson in Mexico, which would inspire her woven-wire sculptures. The book’s illustrations, too, evoke the handmade; charcoal and colored-pencil drawings are combined with hand-painted and monoprinted paper in distinctive, naive-style collages. Back matter notes tell more about Asawa’s life, including the fact that she and her family were interned during WWII, which is left out of the main text; a list of resources and a fitting “Make Your Own Paper Dragonfly” activity are also appended.

Book Details

ISBN

9781616898366

First Release

October 2019

Genre

Nonfic

Dewey Classification

B

Trim Size

8 1/2 x 11

Page Count

40

Accelerated Reader

N/A

Scholastic Reading Counts

N/A

Lexile

N/A

Format

Print Book

Edition

Hardcover edition

Publisher

Princeton Architectural Press

Potentially Sensitive Areas

None

Topics

Ruth Asawa (1926–2013), US women sculptors, California, Biography, Art and artists, Japanese American sculptors, Black Mountain College, Nature and the natural world, Wire sculpture,

Standard MARC Record

Download Standard MARC Record

Cover Art

Download Cover Art

Recommended Titles From Arts Elementary Plus

Arts Elementary Plus

$17.55

The Bird in Me Flies

by Sara Lundberg

Arts Elementary Plus

$17.55

What a Masterpiece!

by Riccardo Guasco

Arts Elementary Plus

$17.55

Arts Elementary Plus

$17.55
Copyright © 2017 Magento, Inc. All rights reserved.