Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Wet Cement: A Mix of Concrete Poems



by
Bob Raczka

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Macmillan
Imprint
Roaring Brook
ISBN
9781626722361

Awards and Honors
ALA-CBC Building a Home Library Booklist - 2018
The Kirkus Prize 2016 Nominee, Young Readers
ALA Notable Books for Children Nominee–Summer 2016, Poetry
Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2016, Picture Books
New York Public Library 2016 Best Books for Kids, Poetry
NCTE Notable Poetry List 2017
ALSC Notable Children’s Books 2017, Middle Readers
ILA Children’s Choices 2017 Reading List*
Children’s Literature Assembly, 2017 Notable Children’s Books in the Language Arts Award
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$10.80   $9.00
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

Easy Reading Plus

The letters and words in this lively collection “paint pictures.” Leaning dominoes “coming down / single file / . . . / join the pile,” and a row of icicles hang vertically, dripping from the top of the page. Author’s note.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

48

Trim Size

6 1/2" x 9"

AR

0: points 0

Lexile

580L

Genre

Nonfic / Poetry

Scholastic Reading Counts

3

JLG Release

Apr 2016

Book Genres


Topics

Poetry. Concrete poetry. Words.

Standard MARC Records

Download Standard MARC Records

Cover Art

Download Cover Art

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books*, Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine*, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
At the start of this collection, Raczka notes that he likes to think of poems as “word paintings,” and he demonstrates this philosophy to marvelous effect. In each of his 21 concrete poems, he groups the words in a shape that complements or emphasizes the meaning or central concept. Raczka goes even further, playfully arranging the letters in the one-word titles of his poems as well. Even the table of contents is constructed to resemble a table. The result is a fun and clever collection that is sure to inspire young poets. While short, the poems are by turns amusing and thoughtful and make excellent use of figurative language devices. A selection about the Big Dipper includes a metaphor that describes the constellation as “a vessel of stars, my brim overflowing with night.” Another offering depicts a thunderstorm as “a cloud tantrum.” A few layouts may test some readers, such as one about a home run in which one whole line is printed backward, but most students will enjoy the challenge. VERDICT This winning assortment should find a place in most libraries.—Lauren Strohecker, McKinley Elementary School, Abington School District, PA

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
Graphic design meets riddle meets visual wordplay in this collection of sturdy and joyful perspectives on the ordinary stuff of the world. Each of the twentyone offerings consists of a one-word title and a more extended poem. The titles (which would make wonderful posters) make their wry points with an immediate impression. One l from the title “balloon” floats free and becomes the string of an escaping balloon. The is in the word icicles turn upside down, and one begins to melt. The poems themselves are a more extended game, variously involving reading aloud, turning the page upside-down, reading bottom to top, and, in one case, reading in a mirror. Most of all they take imaginative thinking. What are a clothes hanger’s thoughts on hanging out? In what way is a xylophone a phone? Following the many corners of a maze poem, we experience what it would be like to be a lab mouse. On every page we confront the relationship between the word and the thing, a relationship that surely underlies all poetry. In the final poem, an exercise in paring away, Raczka issues a graceful invitation. “Poetry is about taking away the words you don’t need / poetry is taking away words you don’t need / poetry is words you need / poetry is words / try.” sarah ellis

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
At the start of this collection, Raczka notes that he likes to think of poems as “word paintings,” and he demonstrates this philosophy to marvelous effect. In each of his 21 concrete poems, he groups the words in a shape that complements or emphasizes the meaning or central concept. Raczka goes even further, playfully arranging the letters in the one-word titles of his poems as well. Even the table of contents is constructed to resemble a table. The result is a fun and clever collection that is sure to inspire young poets. While short, the poems are by turns amusing and thoughtful and make excellent use of figurative language devices. A selection about the Big Dipper includes a metaphor that describes the constellation as “a vessel of stars, my brim overflowing with night.” Another offering depicts a thunderstorm as “a cloud tantrum.” A few layouts may test some readers, such as one about a home run in which one whole line is printed backward, but most students will enjoy the challenge. VERDICT This winning assortment should find a place in most libraries.—Lauren Strohecker, McKinley Elementary School, Abington School District, PA

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
Graphic design meets riddle meets visual wordplay in this collection of sturdy and joyful perspectives on the ordinary stuff of the world. Each of the twentyone offerings consists of a one-word title and a more extended poem. The titles (which would make wonderful posters) make their wry points with an immediate impression. One l from the title “balloon” floats free and becomes the string of an escaping balloon. The is in the word icicles turn upside down, and one begins to melt. The poems themselves are a more extended game, variously involving reading aloud, turning the page upside-down, reading bottom to top, and, in one case, reading in a mirror. Most of all they take imaginative thinking. What are a clothes hanger’s thoughts on hanging out? In what way is a xylophone a phone? Following the many corners of a maze poem, we experience what it would be like to be a lab mouse. On every page we confront the relationship between the word and the thing, a relationship that surely underlies all poetry. In the final poem, an exercise in paring away, Raczka issues a graceful invitation. “Poetry is about taking away the words you don’t need / poetry is taking away words you don’t need / poetry is words you need / poetry is words / try.” sarah ellis

Grades 1-3
Easy Reading Plus
For Grades 1-3

Don't stop at just 12. Order this extended category and treat your students to even more challenges-with 12 additional Easy Reading titles delivered to your library each year.

14 books per Year
$213.50 per Year
Interests
Beginning Readers,Chapter Books,Fiction,Picture Books
Like this book?
Get more like this every month.
LEARN MORE
Grades 1-3
Easy Reading Plus
14 books per Year
$213.50 per Year

Other Recommended Titles From Easy Reading Plus

Easy Reading Plus

October 2021

When Grandfather Flew

by Patricia MacLachlan

Easy Reading Plus

October 2021

Easy Reading Plus

September 2021

Easy Reading Plus

September 2021
Copyright © 2017 Magento, Inc. All rights reserved.