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Clean Getaway



by
Nic Stone
illustrated by
Dawud Anyabwile

Edition
Library edition with trade jacket added
Publisher
Penguin Random House
Imprint
Crown
ISBN
9781984892980
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Language: Mild Language, Discrimination: Racial Insensitivity/Racism
$16.30
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

How to Go on an Unplanned Road Trip with Your Grandma:
• Grab a Suitcase: Prepacked from the big spring break trip that got CANCELLED.
• Fasten Your Seatbelt: G’ma’s never conventional, so this trip won’t be either.
• Use the Green Book: G’ma’s most treasured possession. It holds history, memories, and most important, the way home.

What Not to Bring:
• A Cell Phone: Avoid contact with Dad at all costs. Even when G’ma starts acting stranger than usual.

Set against the backdrop of the segregation history of the American South, take a trip with New York Times bestselling Nic Stone and an eleven-year-old boy who is about to discover that the world hasn’t always been a welcoming place for kids like him, and things aren’t always what they seem—his G’ma included.Black-and-white illustrations.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Language: Mild Language, Discrimination: Racial Insensitivity/Racism

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

240

Trim Size

8 1/4" x 5 1/2"

Dewey

F

AR

5: points 5

Lexile

780L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Apr 2020

Book Genres

Realistic Fiction

Topics

Grandparents. Grandmothers and grandsons. Road trips. Civil rights. African Americans. Illness. Family life. Spring break. US history.

Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Booklist*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal, The Horn Book Magazine

School Library Journal

William Lamar is an 11-year-old black boy whose anger gets the better of him during an altercation with a school bully. Unfortunately for him, a teacher didn’t witness the bully’s behavior, so William is the one who gets in trouble. William is grounded and subjected to long-winded lectures about his responsibilities as a black boy. His previous involvement in a school cheating scandal doesn’t help matters. William knows that people view his actions differently because he’s black, but no one seems to want to listen to his side of the story. When his grandmother asks him to go on a road trip with her, William can’t wait to leave the solitary confines of his house to hit the road. William and his grandmother use the Green Book, an old-school guide that black people, and interracial couples like his grandparents, used for safe travel in the civil rights days. As they travel deeper into the South, William learns more about his family and the painful secrets that inspired his grandmother’s desire to take this journey. Stone has crafted a history lesson in road-trip form. The novel’s pace and length make it an ideal choice for reluctant readers. This lighthearted adventure story explores racial inequality and the complex nature of interracial relationships. This title is a good addition for school libraries seeking unconventional approaches to history.

Horn Book

When G'ma asks Scoob to go on "a little adventure" during spring break, he doesn't hesitate to say yes (especially since he's been grounded for fighting at school). Once inside her "sweet ride"—the new RV she bought after selling her house—Scoob isn't so sure he made the right choice. First, there are the people on the road who look at them funny because he is black and she is white. Then there's G'ma's treasure boc, which contrains old maps, postcards, newspaper clippings, and a copy of Travelers' Green Book: For Vacation Without Aggravation, 1963. Next, Scoob catches his grandmother changing license plates and refusing to answer Dad's calls. Finally, there's G'ma talking in her sleep about "fixing it." But what is "it"? Scoob isn't so sure he knows who his grandmother is anymore. Young readers will enjoy the mystery and suspence created by G'ma's unusual behavior and the family secrets that are revealed. Occasional maps and illustrations appear throughout, highlighting important moments in each chapter. THis middle-grade debut by Stone is an entertaining and unexpected intergenerational caper.

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

William Lamar is an 11-year-old black boy whose anger gets the better of him during an altercation with a school bully. Unfortunately for him, a teacher didn’t witness the bully’s behavior, so William is the one who gets in trouble. William is grounded and subjected to long-winded lectures about his responsibilities as a black boy. His previous involvement in a school cheating scandal doesn’t help matters. William knows that people view his actions differently because he’s black, but no one seems to want to listen to his side of the story. When his grandmother asks him to go on a road trip with her, William can’t wait to leave the solitary confines of his house to hit the road. William and his grandmother use the Green Book, an old-school guide that black people, and interracial couples like his grandparents, used for safe travel in the civil rights days. As they travel deeper into the South, William learns more about his family and the painful secrets that inspired his grandmother’s desire to take this journey. Stone has crafted a history lesson in road-trip form. The novel’s pace and length make it an ideal choice for reluctant readers. This lighthearted adventure story explores racial inequality and the complex nature of interracial relationships. This title is a good addition for school libraries seeking unconventional approaches to history.

Horn Book

When G'ma asks Scoob to go on "a little adventure" during spring break, he doesn't hesitate to say yes (especially since he's been grounded for fighting at school). Once inside her "sweet ride"—the new RV she bought after selling her house—Scoob isn't so sure he made the right choice. First, there are the people on the road who look at them funny because he is black and she is white. Then there's G'ma's treasure boc, which contrains old maps, postcards, newspaper clippings, and a copy of Travelers' Green Book: For Vacation Without Aggravation, 1963. Next, Scoob catches his grandmother changing license plates and refusing to answer Dad's calls. Finally, there's G'ma talking in her sleep about "fixing it." But what is "it"? Scoob isn't so sure he knows who his grandmother is anymore. Young readers will enjoy the mystery and suspence created by G'ma's unusual behavior and the family secrets that are revealed. Occasional maps and illustrations appear throughout, highlighting important moments in each chapter. THis middle-grade debut by Stone is an entertaining and unexpected intergenerational caper.

Grades 5-7
Upper Elementary & Junior High Plus
For Grades 5-7

A great way to ensure more titles for your middle-grade readers-with 12 additional popular B titles arriving at your door every year.

14 books per Year
$228.20 per Year
Interests
Clean Books,Chapter Books/Novels,Fiction,Reluctant Readers,Transitional Readers,Realistic Fiction
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Grades 5-7
Upper Elementary & Junior High Plus
14 books per Year
$228.20 per Year

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