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      The Fight for Disability Rights

      by Lisa A. Crayton

      Apr 2020

      Series Nonfiction
      History Grades 6-8

      The fight for disability rights continues, even in the wake of successful, ongoing advocacy, activism, and legislation. This valuable resource depicts how the fight has enhanced the lives of people with disabilities, and how readers can continue the efforts. Highlights of renowned activists with historical context, current events, and teen-friendly examples will help teens channel their interests, frustrations, and curiosity into effective activism. A timeline of events with safe, easy-to-implement ideas will inspire future changemakers to team up with others and change the world.

      Fighting to Survive World War II

      by Nancy Dickmann

      Mar 2020

      Series Nonfiction
      History Grades 6-8

      World War II was filled with deadly battles. And people caught in the crossfire were in just as much danger as the soldiers. Learn about the war's determined survivors and what it took for them to escape.

      TV Exposes Brutality on the Selma March: 4D An Augmented Reading Experience

      by Danielle Smith-Llera

      Feb 2020

      Series Nonfiction
      History Grades 6-8

      On-point historical photographs combined with strong narration bring the story of the civil rights marches to life. Kids will learn about the way in which Southern states kept African Americans from voting and the history that led to nonviolent civil rights marches to fight for the right to vote guaranteed by the Constitution. As an added bonus, readers will learn about how this played out on TV and galvanized the civil rights movement, leading to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Seeing the brutality on TV turned the fight for voting rights in the South into a national cause. Accompanying video will show readers what viewers saw at the time.

      Measles: How a Contagious Rash Changed History

      by Mark K. Lewis

      Jan 2020

      Series Nonfiction
      History Grades 6-8

      Measles is an infectious rash that killed millions of people every year before a vaccine was created in 1963. Read this book to learn more about the history of this infectious disease.

      Fats Domino

      by Michael DeMocker

      Dec 2019

      Series Nonfiction
      History Grades 6-8

      While he would become very popular later in his life, Fats Domino had a simple beginning. He was raised by parents who loved music. He had seven siblings, many of which loved to play music too. Fats Domino spent his childhood chopping wood, boxing, and collecting scrap metal. When Domino was ten years old, his family got a piano. After that, every Saturday was a party at his house. There was music, dancing, and friends. Fats Domino fell in love with the piano and in doing so, set himself on a musical path that would shape the rest of his life. Step into this book to see how Fats Domino went from playing for his neighbors in his backyard to playing for all of New Orleans!

      The Early History of the Gay Rights Movement

      by Greg Baldino

      Nov 2019

      Series Nonfiction
      History Grades 6-8

      In the contemporary era, gay and lesbian activism is part of the intersectional LGBTQ+ community, but this wasn't always so. This book explains why the need for the fight for non-heteronormative rights emerged in the nineteenth century. It goes into how the fight itself began to pick up steam in the 1950s and '60s as small groups of radicals grew into a national movement for social justice. Activists across the LGBTQ+ spectrum confront police and government officials, join forces with labor and civil rights struggles, and help reshape the modern world.

      Is the Balance of Power in Government Balanced?

      by Amy Hayes

      Oct 2019

      Series Nonfiction
      History Grades 6-8

      The U.S. Constitution separates government powers into three branches: the executive, the legislative, and the judicial branches. The writers of the Constitution wanted to make sure that the government didn't get too powerful, so they made sure the power in government was balanced. Each branch of the government can check on the others to make sure they're following the rules and not getting too powerful. Throughout the United States' history, many people have challenged the balance of the government through impeachment trials, majority rule in the Legislative branch, and trials in the Supreme Court. Readers will be encouraged to think critically about whether or not the balance of power in U.S. government is truly balanced.

      The Human Genome Project

      by Janey Levy

      Sep 2019

      Series Nonfiction
      History Grades 6-8

      The Human Genome Project was a groundbreaking, life-altering development of the late 20th century and a major evolution in science and medicine. Readers of this remarkable volume will follow the scientists of the international, collaborative research program as they map the human genome. They'll learn about the science behind the project as well as the scientific and medical possibilities opened by it. Vivid photographs support the fascinating text, and sidebars, fact boxes, and captions enrich your reader's experience.

      The Order to Drop the Atomic Bomb, 1945

      by Kaitlyn Duling

      Aug 2019

      Series Nonfiction
      History Grades 6-8

      On August 6, 1945, the course of world history changed forever with the dropping of an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Over half a century later, countries around the globe are still dealing with the lasting effects of this decision. Some of these are physical reminders of the chaos and destruction. Elsewhere, politicians, diplomats, and ordinary citizens continue to grapple with the issue of nuclear weapons and warfare. Through photographs, stories, and documents, this in-depth exploration of the order to drop the bomb offers a detailed look at the events that kicked off the nuclear age.

      TV Shows the World Freedom as the Berlin Wall Falls: 4D An Augmented Reading Experience

      by Danielle Smith-Llera

      Jul 2019

      Series Nonfiction
      History Grades 6-8

      On-point historical photographs combined with strong narration bring the story of the Berlin Wall to life. Kids will learn about the partition of Berlin after WWII, the cold war tensions between the US and the USSR that led to the building of the wall, and the anti-communist pressures that led it to fall. The fall of the wall would become a symbol of democracy and freedom. Readers will understand the significance behind this event through text and clips of the event itself via the Capstone 4D augmented reality app.

      The Evolution of Agricultural Technology

      by Marie, Paula

      Jun 2019

      Series Nonfiction
      History Grades 6-8

      This book chronicles how since the Neolithic era of the Stone Age, agricultural tools evolved from pointed digging sticks to electron microscopes. Weeds evolved into wheat, carrots, and more as humans selected and designed foods. People farmed sustainably since the last Ice Age with fire and fish traps, and more recently, agriculture has evolved to produce more for a growing worldwide population. Learning about problems from the past and the future that agricultural technology is meant to solve will help readers understand how applying critical thinking can change the world.

      TV Shapes Presidential Politics in the Kennedy-Nixon Debates: 4D An Augmented Reading Experience

      by Michael Burgan

      Feb 2019

      Series Nonfiction
      History Grades 6-8

      On-point historical photographs combined with strong narration bring the story of the Nixon-Kennedy presidential debates to life. TV was new in those days, and these were both the first debates ever held between two presidential candidates and the first to be televised. About 60 million people tuned into the first debate, or more than 1/4 of the country's population. Readers will learn just how much effect seeing the debates had on the results of the election and how they changed presidential campaigning forevermore. Readers will understand the significance beind this event through text and clips of the event itself via the Capstone 4D augmented reality app.
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