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      Astronauts: Women on the Final Frontier

      by Jim Ottaviani

      Apr 2020

      Nonfiction Middle

      America may have put the first man on the moon, but it was the Soviet space program that made Valentina Tereshkova the first woman in space. Meanwhile, in the United States, NASA’s first female astronauts were racing toward milestones of their own. These trail-blazing women were admitted into Group 9, NASA’s first mixedgender class. They had the challenging task of convincing the powers that be that a woman’s place is in space. But once they’d been admitted into the training program, they discovered that NASA had plenty to learn about how to make space travel possible for all humans.

      In Astronauts: Women on the Final Frontier, Jim Ottaviani and illustrator Maris Wicks capture the great humor and incredible drive of Mary Cleve, Valentina Tereshkova, and the first women in space.

      Author’s note. References and bibliography. Development sketches. Full-color photographs and illustrations penciled digitally, inked with pen, and then colored digitally.

      Give Us the Vote!: Over Two Hundred Years of Fighting for the Ballot

      by Susan Goldman Rubin

      Mar 2020

      Nonfiction Middle

      For over 200 years, people have marched, gone to jail, risked their lives, and even died trying to get the right to vote in the United States. Others, hungry to acquire or hold onto power, have gone to extraordinary lengths to prevent people from casting ballets or outright stolen votes and sometimes entire elections.

      Perfect for students who want to know more about voting rights, this nonfiction book contains an extensive view of suffrage from the Founding Fathers to the 19th Amendment to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to today’s voter suppression controversies, and explains the barriers people of color, Indigenous people, and immigrants face.

      Eclipse Chaser: Science in the Moon's Shadow

      by Ilima Loomis

      Feb 2020

      Nonfiction Middle

      On August 21, 2017, much of America stood still and looked up as a wide swath of the country experienced totality—a full solar eclipse. Even in areas outside the path of totality, people watched in awe as the moon cast its shadow on the sun. For most, this was simply a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

      Not so for Shadia Habbal, who travels the world in search of solar eclipses in order to study the sun’s corona. Solar wind and storms originating in the corona can have big effects on our planet. They can disrupt technology, expose aircraft to radiation, and even influence global climate change. In the months leading up to the 2017 eclipse, Shadia assembles a team of scientists to set up camp with her in Mitchell, Oregon. Years earlier, a long, expensive trip to Indonesia to study an eclipse failed when the skies remained too cloudy to see it. Shadia is determined to have the 2017 eclipse be a success. Will the computers fail? Will smoke from nearby fires change direction? Will the cloudy skies clear in time?

      Glossary. Selected sources. Index. Full-color photographs, maps, and diagrams.

      Maker Comics: Draw a Comic!

      by J.P. Coovert

      Jan 2020

      Nonfiction Middle

      The International Comics Library is in a lot of trouble! If Maggie can’t come up with $500,000 in a week, Dr. Carl is going to bulldoze her grandfather’s library and turn it into a parking lot! To save the day, she’ll need all her comic drawing skills, the loyal library watchdog, and her new assistant (that’s you!).

      With Draw a Comic!, you'll learn to create and print your own comics books! Follow these simple steps to sketch out your story ideas and ink a comic page. Learn which art supplies are best for drawing comics—you can use a pen, a brush, or even a computer! With the help of photocopy machine, you can even self-publish your own comics and share them with your friends!

      Notes on measurements. Tips for scanning. Glossary. Suggestions for further information. Full-color illustrations done in Photoshop.

      The Poison Eaters: Fighting Danger and Fraud in Our Food and Drugs

      by Gail Jarrow

      Dec 2019

      Nonfiction Middle

      Formaldehyde, borax, salicylic acid. Today, these chemicals are used in embalming fluids, cleaning supplies, and acne medications. But in 1900, they were routinely added to food that Americans ate from cans and jars. Often products weren’t safe because unregulated, unethical companies added these and other chemicals to trick consumers into buying spoiled food or harmful medicines. Chemist Harvey Washington Wiley recognized these dangers and began a relentless thirty-year campaign to ensure that consumers could purchase safe food and drugs, eventually leading to the creation of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA.

      Acclaimed nonfiction and Sibert Honor-winning author Gail Jarrow uncovers this intriguing history in her trademark style that makes the past enthrallingly relevant for today’s young readers.

      Fighting for the Forest: How FDR's Civilian Conservation Corps Helped Save America

      by P. O'Connell Pearson

      Nov 2019

      Nonfiction Middle

      When Franklin D. Roosevelt took office in March 1933, the United States was on the brink of economic collapse and environmental disaster. Thirty-four days later, the first of over three million impoverished young men were building parks and reclaiming the nation’s forests and farmlands. The Civilian Conservation Corps—FDR’s favorite program and “miracle of inter-agency cooperation”—resulted in the building and/or improvement of hundreds of state and national parks, the restoration of nearly 120 million acre of land, and the planting of some three billion trees—more than half of all the trees ever planted in the United States.

      Fighting for the Forest tells the story of the Civilian Conservation Corp through a close look at Shenandoah National Park in Virginia (the CCC’s first project) and through the personal stories and work of young men around the nation who came of age and changed their country for the better working in Roosevelt’s Tree Army.

      Bibliography. Endnotes. Time line. Index. Black-and-white photographs and reproductions.

      Saving the Tasmanian Devil: How Science Is Helping the World's Largest Marsupial Carnivore Survive

      by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent

      Oct 2019

      Nonfiction Middle

      In the late 1990s, a fatal disease called Devil facial tumor disease began wiping out the Tasmanian devil population, killing nearly 90% of the devils over the past 20 years. Why was the entire population getting the same disease? Was it contagious? Then geneticist Jenny Graves made a discovery that was hard to believe, but true: the tumors were cloning and multiplying between animals. If researchers cannot get to the bottom of this mystery, this fascinating mammal will soon be gone. Dorothy Hinshaw Patent takes readers on an unforgettable tour of the Tasmania to meet the scientists working to save the devil before it's too late.

      Glossary. Suggestions for further information. Sources. Index. Full-color photographs and illustrations.

      The Age of Exploration: Epic Fails

      by Erik Slader

      Sep 2019

      Nonfiction Middle

      Christopher Columbus is one of the most famous explorers of all time, but he was neither the first nor last adventurer to ever stumble upon a great discovery. From the Silk Road of Asia to the icy shores of Antarctica, our knowledge of the world today is in large part due to several intrepid pioneers, risking life and limb for the sake of exploration. After all, setting off into the dark unknown requires an enormous amount of bravery. But every explorer quickly learns that courage and curiosity aren’t enough to save you if you can’t read a map or trespass on somebody else’s land!

      In this fourth installment of the "Epic Fails" series, authors Erik Slader and Ben Thompson introduces readers to an international cast of trailblazers and details every mutiny, wrong turn, and undiscovered city of gold behind the age of exploration.

      Time line. Bibliography. Index. Black-and-white photographs and illustrations.

      Disaster Strikes! : The Most Dangerous Space Missions of All Time

      by Jeffrey Kluger

      Aug 2019

      Nonfiction Middle

      There are so many amazing, daring, and exciting missions to outer space that have succeeded. But for every success, there are mistakes, surprises, and flat-out failures that happen along the way. In this collection, bestselling author and award-winning journalist Jeffrey Kluger recounts twelve such disasters, telling the stories of the astronauts and the cosmonauts, the trials and the errors, the missions and the misses. With stories of missions run by both Americans and Russians during the height of the space race, complete with photos of the people and machines behind them, this book delves into the mishaps and the tragedies, small and large, that led humankind to the moon and beyond.

      Author’s note. Glossary. Index. Black-and-white photographs.

      The Tornado Scientist: Seeing Inside Severe Storms

      by Mary Kay Carson

      Jul 2019

      Nonfiction Middle

      Robin Tanamachi has been captivated by tornadoes and extreme weather her entire life. When she realized people researched weather for a job, she was hooked. She now studies tornadogenesis, or how tornadoes form, and what causes them to get weaker versus strengthen. For her, driving around in a Doppler radar truck aiming towards storms is a normal day in the office. The data she collects is then modeled and studied on computers– with math, physics, and computer science working hand in hand with meteorology. At the end of the day, knowing exactly how, when, and where these violent storms happen can give more warning time for everyone involved.

      Glossary. Online resources. Sources and selected bibliography. Index. Full-color photographs and illustrations.

      Fly Girls: How Five Daring Women Defied All Odds and Made Aviation History (Young Readers' Edition)

      by Keith O'Brien

      Jun 2019

      Nonfiction Middle

      In the years between World War I and World War II, airplane racing was one of the most popular sports in America. Thousands of fans flocked to multiday events, and the pilots who competed in these races were hailed as heroes. Well, the male pilots were hailed. Women who flew planes were often ridiculed by the press, and initially they weren’t invited to race. Yet a group of women were determined to take to the sky—no matter what. With guts and grit, they overcame incredible odds both on the ground and in the air to pursue their dreams of flying and racing planes.

      Glossary. Source notes. Index. Black-and-white photographs and reproductions.

      The Perfect Horse: The Daring Rescue of Horses Kidnapped During WWII (Adapted for Young Readers)

      by Elizabeth Letts

      May 2019

      Nonfiction Middle

      When a small troop of American soldiers capture a German spy, they uncover an unexpected secret: Hitler has kidnapped the world’s finest purebred horses and hidden them in a secret Czechoslovakian breeding farm. But, starving Russian troops are drawing closer and the horses face the danger of being slaughtered for food. With little time to spare, Colonel Hank Reed and his soldiers cross enemy lines to heroically save some of the world’s most treasured animals.

      List of characters. Map. Author’s note. Source notes. Bibliography. Index. Black-and-white photo insert.
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