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Penny and Her Marble


Series
Penny

by
Kevin Henkes

Edition
Library edition
Publisher
HarperCollins
Imprint
Greenwillow
ISBN
9780062082046

Awards and Honors
SLJ Best Children’s Books 2013, Picture Books; Kirkus Reviews Best Children’s Books of 2013; 2014 Theodor Seuss Geisel Award Honor Book; Horn Book Fanfare, Best Books of 2013, Fiction; ALA 2014 Notable Children’s Books, Younger Readers; 2013 Cybils Awards, Easy Readers, Finalist
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$10.80   $9.00
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

Easy Reading Plus

On a walk with her doll, Penny spots a “big, shiny blue marble” on Mrs. Goodwin’s lawn. Penny brings it home, but was it hers to take? Full-color illustrations done in watercolor and black pen.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

48

Trim Size

6" x 8 3/8"

Dewey

E

AR

2.5: points 0.5

Lexile

470L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Jul 2013

Book Genres


Topics

Lost and found possessions. Marbles. Mice. Family life.

Standard MARC Records

Download Standard MARC Records

Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Booklist*, The Horn Book Magazine*, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
In the latest installment in the series, the young mouse is pushing her doll’s stroller down the block when she spies a marble on her neighbor’s lawn. After furtively looking around, Penny drops it in her pocket and races home. At first she delights in her new treasure, enjoying how smooth it feels between her fingers and how fast it rolls across the floor, but then she is overcome with guilt for taking something that doesn’t belong to her. Henkes’s nuanced watercolor and ink illustrations capture the shame-filled mouse hiding behind curtains. As she continues to worry, she loses her appetite: “The oranges in the bowl looked like big orange marbles. The peas on her plate looked like little green marbles.” After a dream-filled night, Penny decides to put the marble back where she found it. When confronted by Mrs. Goodwin, Penny’s “cheeks were hot. She could not speak,” but her kind neighbor reassures her that she put the marble on the grass hoping someone would pick it up. Readers will empathize with Penny and her conflicted emotions. The short sentences with plenty of repetition and superb pacing make this title perfect for beginning readers. A treasure.—Linda Ludke, London Public Library, Ontario, Canada

SLJ’s Best Books December 2013, Picture Books
Spotting a gleaming object on her neighbor’s lawn, Penny sneaks it into her pocket, but later feels remorseful and returns the marble to Mrs. Goodwin—who greets her with a lovely surprise. A winsome mouse protagonist, enchanting spring-hued illustrations, and spot-on sensibilities make this easy reader shine.

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
The jacket illustration signals a slight tonal change in this, Penny’s third outing (Penny and Her Song, rev. 3/12; Penny and Her Doll, rev. 9/12). Her upbeat signature color (rose) is replaced by a more subdued robin’s-egg blue; Penny looks downward with a pensive expression. Here, she’s grappling with serious business: sins of commission and omission, accompanied by childlike guilt. That all three issues receive thoughtful examination without any heavy-handedness is to Henkes’s considerable credit. When outside walking her doll, Penny spies a marble on Mrs. Godwin’s lawn. “The marble seemed to say, ‘Take me home.’” And Penny does. With just a turn of her head and a movement of her eye, the illustrations show that Penny clearly knows this is something she shouldn’t do. She hides her marble and dreams about her furtive act with the imagined consequences escalating during the night. Unwilling to confess her deed to her parents, Penny asks for extra hugs, reinforcing the warmth and support in this close-knit family. But Penny, by herself, finds resolution. Beyond his hallmarks of natural language, illustrations that complement the text, and impeccable pacing, Henkes introduces a new aid for young readers. Thoughts, imaginings, and dreams appear in unboxed frames, while concrete action is shown within borders. That respect for the beginning reader’s emerging skills beautifully matches Henkes’s respect for Penny and this common crisis of childhood. betty carter

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
In the latest installment in the series, the young mouse is pushing her doll’s stroller down the block when she spies a marble on her neighbor’s lawn. After furtively looking around, Penny drops it in her pocket and races home. At first she delights in her new treasure, enjoying how smooth it feels between her fingers and how fast it rolls across the floor, but then she is overcome with guilt for taking something that doesn’t belong to her. Henkes’s nuanced watercolor and ink illustrations capture the shame-filled mouse hiding behind curtains. As she continues to worry, she loses her appetite: “The oranges in the bowl looked like big orange marbles. The peas on her plate looked like little green marbles.” After a dream-filled night, Penny decides to put the marble back where she found it. When confronted by Mrs. Goodwin, Penny’s “cheeks were hot. She could not speak,” but her kind neighbor reassures her that she put the marble on the grass hoping someone would pick it up. Readers will empathize with Penny and her conflicted emotions. The short sentences with plenty of repetition and superb pacing make this title perfect for beginning readers. A treasure.—Linda Ludke, London Public Library, Ontario, Canada

SLJ’s Best Books December 2013, Picture Books
Spotting a gleaming object on her neighbor’s lawn, Penny sneaks it into her pocket, but later feels remorseful and returns the marble to Mrs. Goodwin—who greets her with a lovely surprise. A winsome mouse protagonist, enchanting spring-hued illustrations, and spot-on sensibilities make this easy reader shine.

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
The jacket illustration signals a slight tonal change in this, Penny’s third outing (Penny and Her Song, rev. 3/12; Penny and Her Doll, rev. 9/12). Her upbeat signature color (rose) is replaced by a more subdued robin’s-egg blue; Penny looks downward with a pensive expression. Here, she’s grappling with serious business: sins of commission and omission, accompanied by childlike guilt. That all three issues receive thoughtful examination without any heavy-handedness is to Henkes’s considerable credit. When outside walking her doll, Penny spies a marble on Mrs. Godwin’s lawn. “The marble seemed to say, ‘Take me home.’” And Penny does. With just a turn of her head and a movement of her eye, the illustrations show that Penny clearly knows this is something she shouldn’t do. She hides her marble and dreams about her furtive act with the imagined consequences escalating during the night. Unwilling to confess her deed to her parents, Penny asks for extra hugs, reinforcing the warmth and support in this close-knit family. But Penny, by herself, finds resolution. Beyond his hallmarks of natural language, illustrations that complement the text, and impeccable pacing, Henkes introduces a new aid for young readers. Thoughts, imaginings, and dreams appear in unboxed frames, while concrete action is shown within borders. That respect for the beginning reader’s emerging skills beautifully matches Henkes’s respect for Penny and this common crisis of childhood. betty carter

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