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The Sea in Winter



by
Christine Day

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
HarperCo
Imprint
Heartdrum
ISBN
9780062872043
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Discrimination: Racial Insensitivity/Racism
$20.22   $16.85
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QTY

JLG Category

PG Middle Plus

In this evocative and heartwarming novel, the author of I Can Make This Promise tells the story of a Makah/Piscataway girl struggling to find her joy again and the family who will protect her no matter what happens.

Maisie Cannon is having a hard time.

It’s been months since her knee injury, and her recovery process has been painfully slow. As a serious ballet student, Maisie is eager to rebuild her strength and get back to the dance studio. She knows all her ballerina friends are auditioning for prestigious summer dance programs, while she remains sentenced to physical therapy.

But the injury isn't her only problem. Maisie has been irritable toward her parents and little brother lately and can't always explain why. And as Maisie and her family set out on a midwinter road trip, her secrets and anxieties and dark moods are starting to hurt as much as the aches and pains in her knee.Author’s note.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Discrimination: Racial Insensitivity/Racism

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

272

Trim Size

8 3/10" x 5 1/2"

Dewey

F

AR

4.9: points 6

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Mar 2021

Book Genres

Realistic Fiction

Topics

Anxiety. Ballet. Injuries. Family life. Family vacations. Friendship. Makah Indians. Klallam Indians. Piscataway Indians. Pacific Northwest.

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 4-6–Maisie loves ballet. The studio where she dances is her “sanctuary,” the place where there are no bad days. Now that she’s torn her ACL, a key ligament, she experiences depression. At times, she feels disconnected from her family, and her grades suffer. During an annual midwinter vacation to her stepdad’s native home, she realizes that her dreams of being a dancer may not come true. With the help of her family and therapist, Maisie learns that even though life may not work out the way she wants, she can still move forward. Maisie is Native American. Her mother is Makah, her father was Piscataway, and her stepdad is a citizen of the lower Elwha Klallam Tribe. The scenery of the Pacific Northwest is beautifully painted in this insightful #OwnVoices novel, and the text offers some important history. All the characters are relatable, especially Maisie, her stepdad, and brother. However, her experience with depression is very briefly addressed as a passage in her journal and oversimplified. There is also an unrealistic plot point. Recovering from an ACL tear would deter a lot of families from walking on uneven terrain. Yet on their vacation, Maisie and her family walk on rocky beaches, dig for clams in the ocean, “stumble through clay-like mud,” walk up winding boardwalks, and trudge through snow. Maisie is so worried about her ­ability to dance; it doesn’t seem plausible that her parents would risk her ­getting hurt again, which inevitably happens. ­VERDICT ­Resonant and well-represented Native American ­characters, and a few flaws make this a choice for many middle grade collections. Some fans of ­realistic fiction will enjoy.–Rebecca Fitzgerald, Harrison P.L., NY

Horn Book

“My ballet studio has always been my sanctuary.” In October, twelve-year-old Maisie suffered a devastating knee injury and subsequent ACL surgery. Now it’s February, and with hard work and physical therapy she has been cleared to go on a winter-break hiking trip to Washington’s Olympic Peninsula with her parents and younger brother. Maisie’s family is Native—her mom is Makah; her father, who has passed away, was Piscataway; her stepfather, Jack, is an enrolled citizen of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, and eager for their journey to the Elwha River. On vacation, Maisie, in a rush to prove her recovery, and without dealing with the emotional fallout from her surgery, reinjures herself. The story takes place primarily over the course of four days, during which we get to know Maisie’s family uncommonly well through quotidian details and worldview-encompassing conversations; secondary characters, too, are nuanced and vividly drawn. Maisie’s pain is specific to her experience while being relatable to many readers going through big life changes. Her alienation, denial, and despair make her eventual opening up feel cathartic and narratively earned. The Pacific Northwest setting is atmospherically described and indicative of this Native blended family’s formative experiences. An appended author’s note provides more details about the Native history touched on in the story. ELISSA GERSHOWITZ

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 4-6–Maisie loves ballet. The studio where she dances is her “sanctuary,” the place where there are no bad days. Now that she’s torn her ACL, a key ligament, she experiences depression. At times, she feels disconnected from her family, and her grades suffer. During an annual midwinter vacation to her stepdad’s native home, she realizes that her dreams of being a dancer may not come true. With the help of her family and therapist, Maisie learns that even though life may not work out the way she wants, she can still move forward. Maisie is Native American. Her mother is Makah, her father was Piscataway, and her stepdad is a citizen of the lower Elwha Klallam Tribe. The scenery of the Pacific Northwest is beautifully painted in this insightful #OwnVoices novel, and the text offers some important history. All the characters are relatable, especially Maisie, her stepdad, and brother. However, her experience with depression is very briefly addressed as a passage in her journal and oversimplified. There is also an unrealistic plot point. Recovering from an ACL tear would deter a lot of families from walking on uneven terrain. Yet on their vacation, Maisie and her family walk on rocky beaches, dig for clams in the ocean, “stumble through clay-like mud,” walk up winding boardwalks, and trudge through snow. Maisie is so worried about her ­ability to dance; it doesn’t seem plausible that her parents would risk her ­getting hurt again, which inevitably happens. ­VERDICT ­Resonant and well-represented Native American ­characters, and a few flaws make this a choice for many middle grade collections. Some fans of ­realistic fiction will enjoy.–Rebecca Fitzgerald, Harrison P.L., NY

Horn Book

“My ballet studio has always been my sanctuary.” In October, twelve-year-old Maisie suffered a devastating knee injury and subsequent ACL surgery. Now it’s February, and with hard work and physical therapy she has been cleared to go on a winter-break hiking trip to Washington’s Olympic Peninsula with her parents and younger brother. Maisie’s family is Native—her mom is Makah; her father, who has passed away, was Piscataway; her stepfather, Jack, is an enrolled citizen of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, and eager for their journey to the Elwha River. On vacation, Maisie, in a rush to prove her recovery, and without dealing with the emotional fallout from her surgery, reinjures herself. The story takes place primarily over the course of four days, during which we get to know Maisie’s family uncommonly well through quotidian details and worldview-encompassing conversations; secondary characters, too, are nuanced and vividly drawn. Maisie’s pain is specific to her experience while being relatable to many readers going through big life changes. Her alienation, denial, and despair make her eventual opening up feel cathartic and narratively earned. The Pacific Northwest setting is atmospherically described and indicative of this Native blended family’s formative experiences. An appended author’s note provides more details about the Native history touched on in the story. ELISSA GERSHOWITZ

Grades 5-8
PG Middle Plus
For Grades 5-8

For middle school readers who enjoy fascinating stories but want less edgy content, PGM is the perfect choice. Be assured that the 12 books offered in this category will be inoffensive to readers, teachers and parents.

14 books per Year
$235.90 per Year
Interests
Clean Books,Chapter Books/Novels,Diversity,Fiction,Funny/Humorous,Reluctant Readers
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Grades 5-8
PG Middle Plus
14 books per Year
$235.90 per Year

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