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Turning Point



by
Paula Chase

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
HarperCollins
Imprint
Greenwillow Bks.
ISBN
9780062965660
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Discrimination: Racial Insensitivity/Racism , Sexual Content: Mild Sexual Content/Themes , Sexual Content: Sexual Harassment
$16.80   $14.00
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Told in dual perspectives, this provocative and timely stand-alone companion to Paula Chase’s So Done and Dough Boys will resonate with fans of Jason Reynolds, Rebecca Stead, and Renée Watson.

Best friends Rasheeda and Monique are both good girls. For Sheeda, that means keeping her friends close and following her deeply religious, Bible-quoting aunt’s every rule. For Mo, that means not making waves in the prestigious and mostly White ballet intensive she’s been accepted to. But what happens when Sheeda catches the eye of Mo’s older brother, and the invisible racial barriers to success as a ballerina turn out to be not so invisible?

Paula Chase continues to explore the lives of African American middle school characters from the Cove, a low-income housing project, in this stand-alone companion to So Done and Dough Boys. Both universal and specific, Turning Point is rich with thematic threads such as racism, body image, poverty, creativity, religion, Me Too, friendship, and family running through it. A rewarding and thought-provoking read for the older middle grade audience.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Discrimination: Racial Insensitivity/Racism , Sexual Content: Mild Sexual Content/Themes , Sexual Content: Sexual Harassment

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

384

Trim Size

8 3/10" x 5 1/2"

Dewey

F

AR

4.9: points 10

Lexile

730L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Jan 2021

Book Genres

Realistic Fiction

Topics

Best friends. Friendship. Ballet dancing. African Americans. Microaggressions. Crushes. Church communities. Housing projects. Aunts and nieces.

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Horn Book

The crew from the Cove (So Done, rev. 7/18; Dough Boys, rev. 7/19) is back, and best friends Rasheeda “Sheeda” Tate and Monique “Mo” Jenkins are the featured duo this go-round. Having declared it “the Lonely Summer,” Sheeda is sad to lose Mo to a three-week intensive ballet camp; her only options for a social life are the church acquaintances her strict aunt keeps shoving her toward or bossy, opinionated neighborhood friend Tai. A third option suddenly becomes available when Mo’s older brother makes it known he’d like to be more than friends. Meanwhile, although aware that her brother is trying to run some “weak game” with her best friend, Mo, who is one of the only Black dancers at camp, is more concerned with proving she’s worthy of both the intensive summer training and an invitation to join the ballet school year-round, even if she doesn’t have a “typical” ballet body. Empathetic to the ambiguities of Black girlhood, and to adolescence in general, Chase moves effortlessly between Sheeda’s and Mo’s alternating chapters, as they go forward with a better understanding of themselves and each other. Readers will root for Sheeda and Mo’s friendship from beginning to end. While the full dynamics of various characters and relationships are made clear in the previous two books, this novel is a solid standalone. EBONI NJOKU

Praise & Reviews

Horn Book

The crew from the Cove (So Done, rev. 7/18; Dough Boys, rev. 7/19) is back, and best friends Rasheeda “Sheeda” Tate and Monique “Mo” Jenkins are the featured duo this go-round. Having declared it “the Lonely Summer,” Sheeda is sad to lose Mo to a three-week intensive ballet camp; her only options for a social life are the church acquaintances her strict aunt keeps shoving her toward or bossy, opinionated neighborhood friend Tai. A third option suddenly becomes available when Mo’s older brother makes it known he’d like to be more than friends. Meanwhile, although aware that her brother is trying to run some “weak game” with her best friend, Mo, who is one of the only Black dancers at camp, is more concerned with proving she’s worthy of both the intensive summer training and an invitation to join the ballet school year-round, even if she doesn’t have a “typical” ballet body. Empathetic to the ambiguities of Black girlhood, and to adolescence in general, Chase moves effortlessly between Sheeda’s and Mo’s alternating chapters, as they go forward with a better understanding of themselves and each other. Readers will root for Sheeda and Mo’s friendship from beginning to end. While the full dynamics of various characters and relationships are made clear in the previous two books, this novel is a solid standalone. EBONI NJOKU

Grades 5-8
Realistic Fiction Middle Plus
For Grades 5-8

Stories with strong, relatable characters that portray believable contemporary or historical real-life experiences.

14 books per Year
$235.90 per Year
Interests
Chapter Books/Novels,Diversity,Fiction,History,Realistic Fiction
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Grades 5-8
Realistic Fiction Middle Plus
14 books per Year
$235.90 per Year

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