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The Honeybee Man



written by
Lela Nargi
illustrated by
Kyrsten Brooker

Edition
-
Publisher
Schwartz & Wade
Imprint
Schwartz & Wade
ISBN
9780375956959

Awards and Honors
Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12: 2012; 2012 CCBC Choices
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$6.00   $5.00
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QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

Easy Reading Plus

Fred is a beekeeper. It’s a slightly unusual hobby. But what is truly remarkable is where Fred harvests the honey: on his rooftop, in Brooklyn, New York. Facts about honey, honeybees, and beekeepers. Full-color illustrations rendered in collage and oil paint.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

40

Trim Size

9 1/2" x 10 1/2"

Dewey

E

AR

4.8: points 0.5

Lexile

AD870L

Scholastic Reading Counts

2

JLG Release

Jun 2011

Topics

Honeybees. Bees. Beekeepers. Bee culture. Brooklyn, New York. Honey.

Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

Although most people probably associate honeybees with fields of flowers in the countryside, Fred tends his hives on the rooftop of his home in Brooklyn. From there the intrepid worker bees fly out to gather nectar from backyard flowers and blossoming bushes. Fred follows them in his imagination, creating pictures that allow readers to view scenes inside the hives and learn about how the bees work together. At the end of summer Fred collects and processes the honeycomb to produce jars of amber honey that he shares with his neighbors. His affection for his bees is evident in the warm tones of Brooker’s collage and oil illustrations as well as in the words of the sweet, lyrical text. Nargi incorporates basic facts about honeybees and beekeeping into her narrative and supplies two additional pages of information following Fred’s story. Pair this with Laurie Krebs’s story about beekeeping in the country in The Beeman (Barefoot, 2008) or Lori Mortensen’s look at wild bees in In the Trees, Honey Bees! (Dawn, 2009) for other views about how and where bees produce honey. However, Nargi’s book can definitely stand on its own for its unusual glimpse of beekeeping in an urban setting.—Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University, Mankato

Horn Book

In the tradition of Lois Lenski’s long-ago Mr. Small, Fred—a contented bachelor—models beekeeping in New York City’s Brooklyn, a setting that adds interest to this typically rural activity. Bees constitute Fred’s “enormous family”; his hives are on his roof, and even among the city’s buildings they find enough of particular plants to impart the flavor of, say, blueberries. Fred’s busy daily round, beginning with a cozy cup of tea and greetings for his anxious-looking dog and insouciant cat, makes an appealing frame for the main event: tending his “tiny city” of three hives. Fred imagines the bees’ flight to nearby backyards, affectionately welcomes them home, and harvests enough honey to share with neighbors whose gardens the bees may have visited. Brooker enhances the book’s fictive side with interestingly skewed perspectives, textured details in collage, and a cheerfully upbeat characterization of Fred himself. The accurately detailed text is nicely supplemented by clear endpaper diagrams of bees, flowers, and hives. The Honeybee Man isn’t really a story, but it’s an engaging introduction to a fascinating activity. A note extends the information.

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Although most people probably associate honeybees with fields of flowers in the countryside, Fred tends his hives on the rooftop of his home in Brooklyn. From there the intrepid worker bees fly out to gather nectar from backyard flowers and blossoming bushes. Fred follows them in his imagination, creating pictures that allow readers to view scenes inside the hives and learn about how the bees work together. At the end of summer Fred collects and processes the honeycomb to produce jars of amber honey that he shares with his neighbors. His affection for his bees is evident in the warm tones of Brooker’s collage and oil illustrations as well as in the words of the sweet, lyrical text. Nargi incorporates basic facts about honeybees and beekeeping into her narrative and supplies two additional pages of information following Fred’s story. Pair this with Laurie Krebs’s story about beekeeping in the country in The Beeman (Barefoot, 2008) or Lori Mortensen’s look at wild bees in In the Trees, Honey Bees! (Dawn, 2009) for other views about how and where bees produce honey. However, Nargi’s book can definitely stand on its own for its unusual glimpse of beekeeping in an urban setting.—Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University, Mankato

Horn Book

In the tradition of Lois Lenski’s long-ago Mr. Small, Fred—a contented bachelor—models beekeeping in New York City’s Brooklyn, a setting that adds interest to this typically rural activity. Bees constitute Fred’s “enormous family”; his hives are on his roof, and even among the city’s buildings they find enough of particular plants to impart the flavor of, say, blueberries. Fred’s busy daily round, beginning with a cozy cup of tea and greetings for his anxious-looking dog and insouciant cat, makes an appealing frame for the main event: tending his “tiny city” of three hives. Fred imagines the bees’ flight to nearby backyards, affectionately welcomes them home, and harvests enough honey to share with neighbors whose gardens the bees may have visited. Brooker enhances the book’s fictive side with interestingly skewed perspectives, textured details in collage, and a cheerfully upbeat characterization of Fred himself. The accurately detailed text is nicely supplemented by clear endpaper diagrams of bees, flowers, and hives. The Honeybee Man isn’t really a story, but it’s an engaging introduction to a fascinating activity. A note extends the information.

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