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Want to Be in a Band?



by
Suzzy Roche
illustrated by
Giselle Potter

Edition
Library edition with trade jacket added
Publisher
Random House
Imprint
Schwartz & Wade
ISBN
9780375968792
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$12.00   $5.00
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QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

Easy Reading Plus

Want to be in a band? Folk rocker Suzzy Roche offers her unique steps, including begging your sisters to sing with you and pretending your dog is Ringo Starr. Full-color illustrations done in watercolor and ink.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

40

Trim Size

10" x 10"

Dewey

E

AR

4: points 0.5

Lexile

AD760L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

2

JLG Release

Jun 2013

Book Genres


Topics

Bands. Music. Musicians. Sisters. Practice. Determination. Cooperation.

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

Appealing to the listener’s inner musician, the author (youngest sister of the indie folk-rock trio, the Roches) begins with a question: “Are you one of those kids who likes to make noise?” She then prescribes a plan to form a successful band, even if “you only know how to play air guitar.” Skeptics may not make it beyond their disbelief, but Roche continues with a rundown involving the pain of learning to play a stringed instrument (her choice), tips for dealing with discouragement, the necessity of practicing, and attending to reactions. Potter’s signature naïve style is the perfect accompaniment to the fictionalized narrative of these women—noted for their quirky lyrics and humorous performances. The artist uses bright watercolors and bold patterns to highlight the sisters and their family; the backgrounds are more subdued, and the audiences, monochromatic. While the pajama-clad child prancing around the kitchen, banging a pot and wearing a colander on her head, suggests a younger demographic, this is not the right companion for Leslie Patricelli’s Be Quiet, Mike! (Candlewick, 2011). Many years and page turns go by before a band is named, formed, discovered, recorded, and touring. Readers need patience and an interest in the process and the motivations of the aging performers. While the second-person voice is occasionally awkward as it mixes Roche’s life with children’s imagined experiences, it does draw readers in. Recommended for music fans in intimate, intergenerational settings.—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library

Horn Book

Doesn’t everyone want to be in a band? Suzzy Roche, one of the trio of sisters constituting the Roches, explains to young readers how to go about making a musical dream come true. Speaking directly to her audience (“Are you one of those kids who likes to make noise?”), she keeps readers’ attention with her folksy, friendly voice and story. The narrative describes her own story (“First, you’ll need two interesting, smart older sisters who can play guitars and sing”), but the specifics are what make this how-to book so readable: once those sisters agree to start a band, “beg them to let you be in it too, even though you only know how to play air guitar.” Potter’s illustrations suit the quirky, homey feel of the text and authentically re-create time periods (starting in the 1960s) without making the events seem old-fashioned or dated. Encouraging (about not giving up even when your instrument is hard to learn), honest (about stage fright), and realistic (about disagreements among band members), Roche’s story will entertain a wide audience—not just those looking to start a band. jennifer m. brabander

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Appealing to the listener’s inner musician, the author (youngest sister of the indie folk-rock trio, the Roches) begins with a question: “Are you one of those kids who likes to make noise?” She then prescribes a plan to form a successful band, even if “you only know how to play air guitar.” Skeptics may not make it beyond their disbelief, but Roche continues with a rundown involving the pain of learning to play a stringed instrument (her choice), tips for dealing with discouragement, the necessity of practicing, and attending to reactions. Potter’s signature naïve style is the perfect accompaniment to the fictionalized narrative of these women—noted for their quirky lyrics and humorous performances. The artist uses bright watercolors and bold patterns to highlight the sisters and their family; the backgrounds are more subdued, and the audiences, monochromatic. While the pajama-clad child prancing around the kitchen, banging a pot and wearing a colander on her head, suggests a younger demographic, this is not the right companion for Leslie Patricelli’s Be Quiet, Mike! (Candlewick, 2011). Many years and page turns go by before a band is named, formed, discovered, recorded, and touring. Readers need patience and an interest in the process and the motivations of the aging performers. While the second-person voice is occasionally awkward as it mixes Roche’s life with children’s imagined experiences, it does draw readers in. Recommended for music fans in intimate, intergenerational settings.—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library

Horn Book

Doesn’t everyone want to be in a band? Suzzy Roche, one of the trio of sisters constituting the Roches, explains to young readers how to go about making a musical dream come true. Speaking directly to her audience (“Are you one of those kids who likes to make noise?”), she keeps readers’ attention with her folksy, friendly voice and story. The narrative describes her own story (“First, you’ll need two interesting, smart older sisters who can play guitars and sing”), but the specifics are what make this how-to book so readable: once those sisters agree to start a band, “beg them to let you be in it too, even though you only know how to play air guitar.” Potter’s illustrations suit the quirky, homey feel of the text and authentically re-create time periods (starting in the 1960s) without making the events seem old-fashioned or dated. Encouraging (about not giving up even when your instrument is hard to learn), honest (about stage fright), and realistic (about disagreements among band members), Roche’s story will entertain a wide audience—not just those looking to start a band. jennifer m. brabander

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