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Last Stop on Market Street



by
Matt de la Peña
illustrated by
Christian Robinson

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Penguin
Imprint
Putnam’s
ISBN
9780399257742

Awards and Honors
2016 Newbery Medal Winner
2016 Caldecott Honor Book
2016 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award Honor Book
2015 E. B. White Read Aloud Award Honor, Picture Book
Capitol Choices 2016
Publishers Weekly Best Children’s Books of 2015, Picture Books
SLJ’s Top Latino-themed Books 2015
Horn Book Fanfare List: Best Books of 2015, Picture Books
The New York Times Notable Children’s Books of 2015, Picture Books
Kirkus Reviews Best Children’s Books of 2015, Picture Books
Goodreads Choice Awards 2015, Picture Books
2016 NCTE Charlotte Huck Award Recommended Book
ALA Notable Books for Children 2016, Younger Readers
Chicago Public Library Best Books of 2015, Picture Books
New York Public Library’s 100 Notable Titles for Reading and Sharing 2015, Children’s Books
2016 Winner, Notable Books for a Global Society
2016 Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People, 3–5
2016 CCBC Choices–Picture Books for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers
2015 Cybils Awards Nomination, Fiction Picture Books
Best Multicultural Books of 2015
ILA Teachers’ Choices, 2016 Reading List
Charlotte Zolotow, 2016 Honor
Triple Crown National Book Award 2016-2017
Children’s Book Committee Bank Street College of Education Best Children’s Books of 2016, Under 5
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$10.80   $9.00
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

City Elementary

2016 Newbery Medal Winner
CJ resents spending his Sundays volunteering in a soup kitchen while other boys ride bikes and listen to their iPods. Nana helps him find joy in their routine. Full-color illustrations.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

32

Dewey

E

AR

3.3: points 0.5

Lexile

AD610L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Feb 2015

Book Genres


Topics

Buses. Grandmothers. City life. Volunteering. African Americans.

Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine*, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

After church on Sundays, CJ and his nana wait for the bus. It’s a familiar routine, but this week CJ is feeling dissatisfied. As they travel to their destination, the boy asks a series of questions: “How come we gotta wait for the bus in all this wet?” “Nana, how come we don’t got a car?” “How come we always gotta go here after church?” CJ is envious of kids with cars, iPods, and more freedom than he has. With each question, Nana points out something for CJ to appreciate about his life: “Boy, what do we need a car for? We got a bus that breathes fire.” These gentle admonishments are phrased as questions or observations rather than direct answers so that CJ is able to take ownership of his feelings. After they exit the bus, CJ wonders why this part of town is so run-down, prompting Nana to reply, “Sometimes when you’re surrounded by dirt, CJ, you’re a better witness for what’s beautiful.” The urban setting is truly reflective, showing people with different skin colors, body types, abilities, ages, and classes in a natural and authentic manner. Robinson’s flat, blocky illustrations are simple and well composed, seemingly spare but peppered with tiny, interesting details. Ultimately, their destination is a soup kitchen, and CJ is glad to be there. This is an excellent book that highlights less popular topics such as urban life, volunteerism, and thankfulness, with people of color as the main characters. A lovely title.—Anna Haase Krueger, Ramsey County Library, MN

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
CJ, a young black boy, has a flurry of questions for his grandmother one rainy day: “How come we gotta wait for the bus in all this wet?” “How come we don’t got a car?” “How come we always gotta go here after church?” Only at book’s end do readers learn that “here” is a soup kitchen in a hardscrabble part of town (“How come it’s always so dirty over here?”) where CJ and Nana work every Sunday. Nana has a bottomless supply of look-on-the-sunny-side answers (“Sometimes when you’re surrounded by dirt, CJ, you’re a better witness for what’s beautiful”), but she isn’t dispensing bromides; the economical, exquisitely composed collage illustrations showing the pair in a glamour-free urban setting forbid a glib reading. CJ and Nana develop a fellowship with the bus driver, Mr. Dennis, and with the other passengers (a blind man and his dog; an old woman holding a jar of butterflies; a man playing the guitar), and it takes just a gentle nudge from Nana for CJ to unhesitatingly drop the coin Mr. Dennis gave him into the musician’s hat. De la Peña and Robinson here are carrying on for Ezra Jack Keats in spirit and visual style. This quietly remarkable book will likely inspire questions of a sort less practical-minded than CJ’s; it will also have some adult readers reaching for a tissue. nell beram

The Horn Book Guide Review:
CJ, a young black boy, has a flurry of questions for his grandmother one rainy day. “How come we always gotta go here after church?” “Here” is a soup kitchen, where they work every Sunday. Nana has bottomless look-on-the-sunny-side answers, but she isn’t dispensing bromides; the exquisitely composed collage illustrations showing a glamour-free urban setting forbid a glib reading. A quietly remarkable book.

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

After church on Sundays, CJ and his nana wait for the bus. It’s a familiar routine, but this week CJ is feeling dissatisfied. As they travel to their destination, the boy asks a series of questions: “How come we gotta wait for the bus in all this wet?” “Nana, how come we don’t got a car?” “How come we always gotta go here after church?” CJ is envious of kids with cars, iPods, and more freedom than he has. With each question, Nana points out something for CJ to appreciate about his life: “Boy, what do we need a car for? We got a bus that breathes fire.” These gentle admonishments are phrased as questions or observations rather than direct answers so that CJ is able to take ownership of his feelings. After they exit the bus, CJ wonders why this part of town is so run-down, prompting Nana to reply, “Sometimes when you’re surrounded by dirt, CJ, you’re a better witness for what’s beautiful.” The urban setting is truly reflective, showing people with different skin colors, body types, abilities, ages, and classes in a natural and authentic manner. Robinson’s flat, blocky illustrations are simple and well composed, seemingly spare but peppered with tiny, interesting details. Ultimately, their destination is a soup kitchen, and CJ is glad to be there. This is an excellent book that highlights less popular topics such as urban life, volunteerism, and thankfulness, with people of color as the main characters. A lovely title.—Anna Haase Krueger, Ramsey County Library, MN

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
CJ, a young black boy, has a flurry of questions for his grandmother one rainy day: “How come we gotta wait for the bus in all this wet?” “How come we don’t got a car?” “How come we always gotta go here after church?” Only at book’s end do readers learn that “here” is a soup kitchen in a hardscrabble part of town (“How come it’s always so dirty over here?”) where CJ and Nana work every Sunday. Nana has a bottomless supply of look-on-the-sunny-side answers (“Sometimes when you’re surrounded by dirt, CJ, you’re a better witness for what’s beautiful”), but she isn’t dispensing bromides; the economical, exquisitely composed collage illustrations showing the pair in a glamour-free urban setting forbid a glib reading. CJ and Nana develop a fellowship with the bus driver, Mr. Dennis, and with the other passengers (a blind man and his dog; an old woman holding a jar of butterflies; a man playing the guitar), and it takes just a gentle nudge from Nana for CJ to unhesitatingly drop the coin Mr. Dennis gave him into the musician’s hat. De la Peña and Robinson here are carrying on for Ezra Jack Keats in spirit and visual style. This quietly remarkable book will likely inspire questions of a sort less practical-minded than CJ’s; it will also have some adult readers reaching for a tissue. nell beram

The Horn Book Guide Review:
CJ, a young black boy, has a flurry of questions for his grandmother one rainy day. “How come we always gotta go here after church?” “Here” is a soup kitchen, where they work every Sunday. Nana has bottomless look-on-the-sunny-side answers, but she isn’t dispensing bromides; the exquisitely composed collage illustrations showing a glamour-free urban setting forbid a glib reading. A quietly remarkable book.

Grades 2-6
City Elementary
For Grades 2-6

Urban situations and plot lines featuring ethnically and culturally diverse characters give these books a unique city flavor and feel. Young urban readers will find familiar images, and readers who are not from the city will enjoy exploring life from a new perspective. The 12 books you'll receive in this category will ensure that urban adventures are available all year long.

12 books per Year
$210.60 per Year
Interests
Diversity,Fiction,Positive Messages
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Grades 2-6
City Elementary
12 books per Year
$210.60 per Year

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