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The Losers Club



by
Andrew Clements

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Penguin Random House
Imprint
Random House
ISBN
9780399557569

Awards and Honors
Rhode Island Children’s Book Award 2019 Nominee
ILA Children's Choices - 2018
Brightly Best Children’s Books of 2017, According to Kids
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$18.96   $15.80
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QTY
Out of stock

Sixth-grader Alec can’t put a good book down. So when Principal Vance lays down the law—pay attention in class, or else—Alec takes action. List of books enjoyed by characters in The Losers Club.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

240

Trim Size

5 1/2" x 8 1/4"

AR

5.5: points 7

Lexile

860L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

13

JLG Release

Oct 2017

Book Genres


Topics

Books and reading. Clubs. Bullying. Schools. Having a crush. After-school activities.

Standard MARC Records

Download Standard MARC Records

Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Booklist, The Horn Book Magazine, Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Sixth grader Alec, a true bibliophile, would rather read for pleasure than listen to his teachers, which often lands him in trouble with his parents, his teachers, and the principal. When Alec joins the after-school program, he is forced to pick a club, and quietly reading is not an option. Alec comes up with a plan to create a club that no kid would ever want to join, the Losers Club, where he can sit alone and read. He does not anticipate, however, that there are others like him who might want to join. Much to Alec’s dismay, the Losers Club soon becomes the most popular group in the program. As the club thrives and Alec makes new friends and reconnects with old ones, he learns that while he does not have to change who he is, he should not let real life pass him by. Clements’s latest is engaging and funny. Book lovers and reluctant readers alike will enjoy the relatable characters, realistic dialogue, and humorous scenes. Alec’s confidence in himself and his ability to solve his problems while staying true to himself are refreshing. A list of the titles mentioned throughout the novel is included. VERDICT A laugh-out-loud first purchase for all middle grade collections, and a solid read-aloud choice for classrooms.—Marissa Lieberman, East Orange Public Library, NJ

Horn Book

There’s a pattern we’ve come to expect from Clements’s middle-grade novels (beginning with Frindle, rev. 11/96): a kid gets a big idea and sees it through to results neither he (usually he) nor readers expect. Here, all sixth-grader Alec wants to do is read. When forced by the afterschool program to join or create a club, he comes up with the Losers Club, whose name he feels will sufficiently put off any intruders into his dream of solitary reading bliss. But there’s a catch: the rules require him to sign up at least one other person. He does, and as the club slowly increases its members—who sign on for reasons both worthy and calculating—Alec finds his expectations of the club and himself changing. The story easily works in themes of friends becoming former friends; friends becoming more than friends (in the most innocent of ways); bullying and teasing; and how reading is the best thing ever. Clements appends the fifty-odd short stories, books, and series Alec and his friends enthusiastically read and share throughout the novel; it is to the author’s credit that his own story makes all those titles (a catholic list, but Hatchet is first in Alec’s heart) seem like great fun indeed. roger sutton

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Sixth grader Alec, a true bibliophile, would rather read for pleasure than listen to his teachers, which often lands him in trouble with his parents, his teachers, and the principal. When Alec joins the after-school program, he is forced to pick a club, and quietly reading is not an option. Alec comes up with a plan to create a club that no kid would ever want to join, the Losers Club, where he can sit alone and read. He does not anticipate, however, that there are others like him who might want to join. Much to Alec’s dismay, the Losers Club soon becomes the most popular group in the program. As the club thrives and Alec makes new friends and reconnects with old ones, he learns that while he does not have to change who he is, he should not let real life pass him by. Clements’s latest is engaging and funny. Book lovers and reluctant readers alike will enjoy the relatable characters, realistic dialogue, and humorous scenes. Alec’s confidence in himself and his ability to solve his problems while staying true to himself are refreshing. A list of the titles mentioned throughout the novel is included. VERDICT A laugh-out-loud first purchase for all middle grade collections, and a solid read-aloud choice for classrooms.—Marissa Lieberman, East Orange Public Library, NJ

Horn Book

There’s a pattern we’ve come to expect from Clements’s middle-grade novels (beginning with Frindle, rev. 11/96): a kid gets a big idea and sees it through to results neither he (usually he) nor readers expect. Here, all sixth-grader Alec wants to do is read. When forced by the afterschool program to join or create a club, he comes up with the Losers Club, whose name he feels will sufficiently put off any intruders into his dream of solitary reading bliss. But there’s a catch: the rules require him to sign up at least one other person. He does, and as the club slowly increases its members—who sign on for reasons both worthy and calculating—Alec finds his expectations of the club and himself changing. The story easily works in themes of friends becoming former friends; friends becoming more than friends (in the most innocent of ways); bullying and teasing; and how reading is the best thing ever. Clements appends the fifty-odd short stories, books, and series Alec and his friends enthusiastically read and share throughout the novel; it is to the author’s credit that his own story makes all those titles (a catholic list, but Hatchet is first in Alec’s heart) seem like great fun indeed. roger sutton

Grades 3-5
Intermediate Readers
For Grades 3-5

A wide variety of novels and accessible nonfiction for younger elementary readers who love a good story comprise this category of 12 books per year. The focus in these titles is primarily on the text, though some novels may feature illustration.

12 books per Year
$195.60 per Year
Interests
Chapter Books,Fiction,Transitional Readers
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Grades 3-5
Intermediate Readers
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