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Piper Green and the Fairy Tree


Series
Piper Green and the Fairy Tree

by
Ellen Potter
illustrated by
Qin Leng

Edition
Library edition with trade jacket added
Publisher
Random House
Imprint
Knopf
ISBN
9780553499247

Awards and Honors
Amazon.com Best Books of the Year 2015, Ages 6–8
ALA Notable Books for Children 2016, Younger Readers
Chicago Public Library Best Books of 2015, Fiction for Younger Readers
100 Notable Titles for Reading and Sharing 2015, Children’s Books
2015 Cybils Awards Nomination, Early Chapter Books
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
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QTY
Out of stock

Piper can’t believe it—her new teacher won’t let her wear earmuffs in the classroom! Maybe the magical Fairy Tree in Piper’s yard can solve the problem. Map. Black-and-white illustrations created using ink and digital painting.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

112

Trim Size

5 1/2" x 7"

AR

3.5: points 1

Lexile

490L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

4

JLG Release

Oct 2015

Book Genres


Topics

Separation (psychology). Brothers and sisters. Family life. Schools. Islands. Maine.

Standard MARC Records

Download Standard MARC Records

Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

Piper Green is a smart-alecky second grader who lives on Peek-a-Boo Island off the coast of Maine. She proudly rides a lobster boat to school each morning and is obsessed with wearing earmuffs that belonged to her older brother, Erik. Her preoccupation with those earmuffs has landed her in trouble. Piper refuses to remove them for her new teacher, who complains to her parents. To avoid going to school, Piper fakes an illness and hides in a neighbor’s tree. While this “fairy” tree contains no real magic, it does hold a delightful surprise. Sadly, this contemporary tale is slight and lacks any real humor. Piper’s slim adventures will not hold the interest of their target audience. While the writing style is clear with a strong use of vocabulary, Piper herself is two-dimensional. Though a certain level of bratty behavior is amusing in books for younger readers, such as Junie B. Jones’s attitude, Piper’s cockiness comes off as downright rude. Her demeanor is attributed to her older brother’s absence, but the reason for his disappearance is simplistic and unsatisfying. The minimal pen-and-ink illustrations, mostly of a frowning Piper, add little to the story. VERDICT Those seeking an engaging adventure would do much better with Sara Pennypacker’s “Clementine” (Disney-Hyperion) or Christine Pakkala’s “Last but Not Least Lola” (Boyds Mills).—Sada Mozer, Los Angeles Public Library

Horn Book

Potter puts her own stamp on the spunky-quirky-stubborn girl story. Piper Green, resident of Peek-a-Boo Island, Maine, is about to start second grade. For her, this involves taking a lobster boat to school and insisting on wearing green monkey-face earmuffs (they belong to her brother Erik, now attending high school on the mainland, whom Piper misses terribly). Her new teacher looks (and walks—swish!) like a princess, so Piper assumes she’ll have a tinkly voice and won’t mind about the earmuffs; but Ms. Arabella does not live up to expectations, and soon Piper is in trouble. Very brief chapters and frequent illustrations swiftly advance the story, as does Piper’s—yep—spunky, quirky, stubborn first-person narration. “‘I wouldn’t like to send you to the principal’s office on your first day of second grade,’ Ms. Arabella said in her most untinkly voice. ‘I don’t think any of us would like that,’ I agreed. We stared at each other. Those earmuffs stayed right on my head.” How the standoff is resolved (it involves skipping school, a hollow tree, an old island story, and kittens) makes for a satisfying, accessible, funny early chapter book. And it doesn’t involve too much capitulation on Piper’s part, in case anyone was worried: “‘It’s nice to see your ears,’ [Ms. Arabella] added, smiling. ‘Nice to see yours too,’ I told her. She made a little noise in her throat before she swished back to her desk.” martha v. parravano

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Piper Green is a smart-alecky second grader who lives on Peek-a-Boo Island off the coast of Maine. She proudly rides a lobster boat to school each morning and is obsessed with wearing earmuffs that belonged to her older brother, Erik. Her preoccupation with those earmuffs has landed her in trouble. Piper refuses to remove them for her new teacher, who complains to her parents. To avoid going to school, Piper fakes an illness and hides in a neighbor’s tree. While this “fairy” tree contains no real magic, it does hold a delightful surprise. Sadly, this contemporary tale is slight and lacks any real humor. Piper’s slim adventures will not hold the interest of their target audience. While the writing style is clear with a strong use of vocabulary, Piper herself is two-dimensional. Though a certain level of bratty behavior is amusing in books for younger readers, such as Junie B. Jones’s attitude, Piper’s cockiness comes off as downright rude. Her demeanor is attributed to her older brother’s absence, but the reason for his disappearance is simplistic and unsatisfying. The minimal pen-and-ink illustrations, mostly of a frowning Piper, add little to the story. VERDICT Those seeking an engaging adventure would do much better with Sara Pennypacker’s “Clementine” (Disney-Hyperion) or Christine Pakkala’s “Last but Not Least Lola” (Boyds Mills).—Sada Mozer, Los Angeles Public Library

Horn Book

Potter puts her own stamp on the spunky-quirky-stubborn girl story. Piper Green, resident of Peek-a-Boo Island, Maine, is about to start second grade. For her, this involves taking a lobster boat to school and insisting on wearing green monkey-face earmuffs (they belong to her brother Erik, now attending high school on the mainland, whom Piper misses terribly). Her new teacher looks (and walks—swish!) like a princess, so Piper assumes she’ll have a tinkly voice and won’t mind about the earmuffs; but Ms. Arabella does not live up to expectations, and soon Piper is in trouble. Very brief chapters and frequent illustrations swiftly advance the story, as does Piper’s—yep—spunky, quirky, stubborn first-person narration. “‘I wouldn’t like to send you to the principal’s office on your first day of second grade,’ Ms. Arabella said in her most untinkly voice. ‘I don’t think any of us would like that,’ I agreed. We stared at each other. Those earmuffs stayed right on my head.” How the standoff is resolved (it involves skipping school, a hollow tree, an old island story, and kittens) makes for a satisfying, accessible, funny early chapter book. And it doesn’t involve too much capitulation on Piper’s part, in case anyone was worried: “‘It’s nice to see your ears,’ [Ms. Arabella] added, smiling. ‘Nice to see yours too,’ I told her. She made a little noise in her throat before she swished back to her desk.” martha v. parravano

Grades 2-4
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