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Diana’s White House Garden



by
Elisa Carbone
illustrated by
Jen Hill

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Penguin
Imprint
Viking
ISBN
9780670016495

Awards and Honors
Triple Crown National Book Award 2016-2017
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$12.00   $7.50
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

JLG Category

Easy Reading Plus

1943: Diana Hopkins, who lives in the White House (her father is President Roosevelt’s chief advisor), is looking to contribute to the war effort. “But what could a ten-year-old girl do?” Author’s note. Full-color pencil, gouache, and digital illustrations.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

44

Trim Size

11" x 9 1/2"

AR

3.6: points 0.5

Lexile

AD610L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

2

JLG Release

Jul 2016

Book Genres


Topics

Diana Hopkins Halsted (1932- ). The White House. Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945). Harry Hopkins (1890-1946). Fala (dog, 1940-1952). Presidents' pets. World War II (1939-1945). Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1862). Victory gardens. Gardening.

Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

Diana (Hopkins) Halsted, the daughter of one of Franklin Roosevelt’s close advisors, lived at the White House during World War II. Without other children around, she spends most of her time with Fala, the Roosevelts’ dog. After her playful activities get her in trouble with the White House staff, it is decided that a good way to direct Diana’s energy would be for her to take care of a Victory Garden on the lawn. The 10-year-old becomes part of a publicity plan to encourage people all over the country to help the war effort by growing their own food. This book connects with the current day as Michelle Obama and many schools are involved in gardening, and demonstrates how that movement has roots in the 1940s. An author’s note describes conversations with the real Diana, who is still living. The style of the illustrations reflects the time period. Created with pencil, gouache, and digital methods, sepia-toned backgrounds are drawn but not filled in or completely colored. Painted people and Fala are fully colored and appear more solid. They are arranged on the pages almost like characters on a stage or paper dolls being moved through different scenes. The effect is visually interesting but not highly engaging for children. The pictures reflect great attention to detail, with people of varying races featured in street scenes in Washington, DC. Front endpapers show the garden plants sprouting, while those at the back include vegetables ready for harvest. VERDICT The many curricular tie-ins make this book a good choice for school libraries.—Lucinda Snyder Whitehurst, St. Christopher’s School, Richmond, VA

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Diana (Hopkins) Halsted, the daughter of one of Franklin Roosevelt’s close advisors, lived at the White House during World War II. Without other children around, she spends most of her time with Fala, the Roosevelts’ dog. After her playful activities get her in trouble with the White House staff, it is decided that a good way to direct Diana’s energy would be for her to take care of a Victory Garden on the lawn. The 10-year-old becomes part of a publicity plan to encourage people all over the country to help the war effort by growing their own food. This book connects with the current day as Michelle Obama and many schools are involved in gardening, and demonstrates how that movement has roots in the 1940s. An author’s note describes conversations with the real Diana, who is still living. The style of the illustrations reflects the time period. Created with pencil, gouache, and digital methods, sepia-toned backgrounds are drawn but not filled in or completely colored. Painted people and Fala are fully colored and appear more solid. They are arranged on the pages almost like characters on a stage or paper dolls being moved through different scenes. The effect is visually interesting but not highly engaging for children. The pictures reflect great attention to detail, with people of varying races featured in street scenes in Washington, DC. Front endpapers show the garden plants sprouting, while those at the back include vegetables ready for harvest. VERDICT The many curricular tie-ins make this book a good choice for school libraries.—Lucinda Snyder Whitehurst, St. Christopher’s School, Richmond, VA

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