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A Stone for Sascha



written and illustrated by
Aaron Becker

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Candlewick
Imprint
Candlewick
ISBN
9780763665968
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$6.00   $5.00
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QTY

JLG Category

Easy Reading Plus

A girl grieves the loss of her dog in an achingly beautiful wordless epic.

Author’s note. Full-color illustrations were painted digitally on a tablet.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

48

Trim Size

9 3/4" x 11"

Dewey

E

AR

0: points 0

Lexile

NP

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Sep 2018

Book Genres


Topics

Death of a pet. Dogs. Grief. Sadness. Family vacations. Family life. Camping. Rocks. Beaches. Passage of time. Past civilizations. Epic stories. Stories without words.

Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

The Horn Book Magazine, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal*, Booklist

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
This wordless story begins with a framed image of a girl embracing her dog. In the next spread, she gathers flowers for its burial. Subsequent readings reveal the foreshadowing in these opening compositions. The title’s golden hue—echoed in the flowers, necklaces worn by the girl and her father, and more—is the color to follow. After the protagonist tosses a stone across the water during the family’s subsequent vacation, the narrative hurtles into a prehistoric meteor shower (or the girl’s imagination) yielding veins of gold deep in the earth. Digital paintings presented in sequential panels and full-bleed spreads follow the pilfering and transformation of this particular mineral sample. The parade of civilizations rising and falling into ruin allows Becker to depict a range of architectural styles and costumes, creating the sort of arresting panoramas introduced in the “Journey” trilogy. Here, though, browns and grays comprise the palette of the past; the scenes are infused with more sfumato, as if seen through the mists of time before believably bringing the action back to the present day. VERDICT Combining a sensitive story line with high adventure and dramatic settings, this will inspire a variety of readers to envision histories of their own found objects.—Wendy Lukehart, District of Columbia Public Library

Horn Book

Heartbreak turns into healing in this wordless tale about loss, the ways in which we ritualize grief, and the cyclical patterns of life on Earth, no less. A girl and her family bury their beloved dog in the yard, the girl’s anguish apparent as she places flowers on the stone covering the burial spot. At the beach, the girl throws a rock into the ocean. Dramatically, viewers are then swept back to the time of the dinosaurs, witnessing a meteor strike the Earth. An early human later discovers part of the meteorite, a large, gold-colored chunk protruding from the ground. The meteorite makes its way through centuries, becoming progressively smaller—first it’s used as an obelisk, then part of an enormous Buddha statue, then a keystone of a bridge, and so on—with dogs at each stop. Along with other rich tones (the brown of the girl’s skin, blue-purple landscapes), Becker uses the color gold as a thread throughout the narrative to identify the meteorite’s many iterations. In the end, the girl, under a sweeping night sky, picks up the very stone that has worked its way through time and places it on the grave of her dog. This circular, layered tale is marked by Becker’s sumptuous, cinematic spreads. Even more epic than his Journey trilogy (Journey, rev. 9/13, and sequels), this is a story that provides new details and new understandings with multiple viewings. julie danielson

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
This wordless story begins with a framed image of a girl embracing her dog. In the next spread, she gathers flowers for its burial. Subsequent readings reveal the foreshadowing in these opening compositions. The title’s golden hue—echoed in the flowers, necklaces worn by the girl and her father, and more—is the color to follow. After the protagonist tosses a stone across the water during the family’s subsequent vacation, the narrative hurtles into a prehistoric meteor shower (or the girl’s imagination) yielding veins of gold deep in the earth. Digital paintings presented in sequential panels and full-bleed spreads follow the pilfering and transformation of this particular mineral sample. The parade of civilizations rising and falling into ruin allows Becker to depict a range of architectural styles and costumes, creating the sort of arresting panoramas introduced in the “Journey” trilogy. Here, though, browns and grays comprise the palette of the past; the scenes are infused with more sfumato, as if seen through the mists of time before believably bringing the action back to the present day. VERDICT Combining a sensitive story line with high adventure and dramatic settings, this will inspire a variety of readers to envision histories of their own found objects.—Wendy Lukehart, District of Columbia Public Library

Horn Book

Heartbreak turns into healing in this wordless tale about loss, the ways in which we ritualize grief, and the cyclical patterns of life on Earth, no less. A girl and her family bury their beloved dog in the yard, the girl’s anguish apparent as she places flowers on the stone covering the burial spot. At the beach, the girl throws a rock into the ocean. Dramatically, viewers are then swept back to the time of the dinosaurs, witnessing a meteor strike the Earth. An early human later discovers part of the meteorite, a large, gold-colored chunk protruding from the ground. The meteorite makes its way through centuries, becoming progressively smaller—first it’s used as an obelisk, then part of an enormous Buddha statue, then a keystone of a bridge, and so on—with dogs at each stop. Along with other rich tones (the brown of the girl’s skin, blue-purple landscapes), Becker uses the color gold as a thread throughout the narrative to identify the meteorite’s many iterations. In the end, the girl, under a sweeping night sky, picks up the very stone that has worked its way through time and places it on the grave of her dog. This circular, layered tale is marked by Becker’s sumptuous, cinematic spreads. Even more epic than his Journey trilogy (Journey, rev. 9/13, and sequels), this is a story that provides new details and new understandings with multiple viewings. julie danielson

Grades 1-3
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Interests
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