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Juana and Lucas



written and illustrated by
Juana Medina

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Candlewick
Imprint
Candlewick
ISBN
9780763672089

Awards and Honors
Beverly Cleary Children's Choice Award 2018–2019 Nominee SLJ’s Best Books of 2016, Chapter Books
Booklist 2016 Editors’ Choice, Books for Youth, Young Readers, Fiction
ALSC Notable Children’s Books 2017, Middle Readers
Booklist Top 10 Books for Youth 2017, Diverse Fiction
2017 Notable Books for a Global Society
2016 Cybils Finalist, Early Chapter Books
2017 Américas Award, Commended Title
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$12.75   $9.75
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QTY
Out of stock

2017 Pura Belpré Award Winner
Juana does not love learning the English. Why is it so important to learn a language that makes so little sense? Full-color illustrations done in ink and watercolor.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

96

Trim Size

6" x 9"

Dewey

F

AR

4.9: points 1

Lexile

870L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

4

JLG Release

Dec 2016

Book Genres


Topics

Bogotá, Colombia. Spanish language. Family life. Dogs. Friendship. School. Learning English as a second language. Grandparents. Traveling. Theme parks.

Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Booklist*, The Horn Book Magazine*, Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Juana lives in Bogotá, Colombia, with her dog Lucas. She loves brussels sprouts, drawing, and especially the comic book superhero Astroman. She most definitely does not like learning “the English.” When her teacher says learning English is going to be a “ton of fun,” Juana knows that it will really be “nada de fun.” Her abuelo, or Abue for short, is a brain surgeon and tries to explain to Juana how learning English can be very useful. He also has a bribe—if Juana learns English, he will take her to the Spaceland amusement park in Florida, where only English is spoken, even by her hero Astroman. Medina has written a first-person narrative filled with expressive description. Spanish words are used throughout, and their meaning is made clear through context. As both author and illustrator, Medina is able to integrate the text and illustrations in unique ways, including spreads in which Juana tells us why, for example, she strongly dislikes her school uniform or why Mami is the most important person in her life. Font design is also used creatively, such as when Medina traces the arc of a soccer ball hit hard enough to be sent “across the field.” VERDICT An essential selection that creates multicultural awareness, has distinguished and appealing design elements, and has a text that is the stuff of true literature.—Tim Wadham, formerly at Puyallup Public Library, WA

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
This brisk, episodic (in the best way) chapter book introduces Juana, a young girl living in Bogotá, Colombia, who loves many things: her city, her family, reading, Brussels sprouts, and her dog, Lucas. She does not like school, though, and especially not her English class—until her grandfather announces that they will be traveling to the United States to visit Spaceland. Juana’s determination to “work muy, muy hard to learn todo the English that I can possibly fit into the space between my pigtails” provides a loose framework for what follows. The first-person narration is distinctive, filled with understated humor (“[Lucas] eats math homework like a pro. The harder the homework, the faster he’ll eat it”) and frequently interspersed Spanish words which the reader is left to identify in context. Dynamic ink and watercolor illustrations bring Juana’s sometimes misdirected energy to life, playing it against the amused affection of those around her, while vivid prose (one teacher “has a voice that sounds like it travels from down in her high heels all the way up to her mouth”), spacious design, and varying typeface underscore Juana’s infectious enthusiasm for language and all its possibilities. Both comfortably familiar (this will be an easy sell for fans of Pennypacker’s Clementine, for instance) and keenly specific in its setting and characters, Juana & Lucas is much needed for the gap it fills in American children’s literature, but it will be much beloved for its warmly depicted family relationships, eminently read-aloudable high jinks, and sunny protagonist. claire e. gross

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Juana lives in Bogotá, Colombia, with her dog Lucas. She loves brussels sprouts, drawing, and especially the comic book superhero Astroman. She most definitely does not like learning “the English.” When her teacher says learning English is going to be a “ton of fun,” Juana knows that it will really be “nada de fun.” Her abuelo, or Abue for short, is a brain surgeon and tries to explain to Juana how learning English can be very useful. He also has a bribe—if Juana learns English, he will take her to the Spaceland amusement park in Florida, where only English is spoken, even by her hero Astroman. Medina has written a first-person narrative filled with expressive description. Spanish words are used throughout, and their meaning is made clear through context. As both author and illustrator, Medina is able to integrate the text and illustrations in unique ways, including spreads in which Juana tells us why, for example, she strongly dislikes her school uniform or why Mami is the most important person in her life. Font design is also used creatively, such as when Medina traces the arc of a soccer ball hit hard enough to be sent “across the field.” VERDICT An essential selection that creates multicultural awareness, has distinguished and appealing design elements, and has a text that is the stuff of true literature.—Tim Wadham, formerly at Puyallup Public Library, WA

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
This brisk, episodic (in the best way) chapter book introduces Juana, a young girl living in Bogotá, Colombia, who loves many things: her city, her family, reading, Brussels sprouts, and her dog, Lucas. She does not like school, though, and especially not her English class—until her grandfather announces that they will be traveling to the United States to visit Spaceland. Juana’s determination to “work muy, muy hard to learn todo the English that I can possibly fit into the space between my pigtails” provides a loose framework for what follows. The first-person narration is distinctive, filled with understated humor (“[Lucas] eats math homework like a pro. The harder the homework, the faster he’ll eat it”) and frequently interspersed Spanish words which the reader is left to identify in context. Dynamic ink and watercolor illustrations bring Juana’s sometimes misdirected energy to life, playing it against the amused affection of those around her, while vivid prose (one teacher “has a voice that sounds like it travels from down in her high heels all the way up to her mouth”), spacious design, and varying typeface underscore Juana’s infectious enthusiasm for language and all its possibilities. Both comfortably familiar (this will be an easy sell for fans of Pennypacker’s Clementine, for instance) and keenly specific in its setting and characters, Juana & Lucas is much needed for the gap it fills in American children’s literature, but it will be much beloved for its warmly depicted family relationships, eminently read-aloudable high jinks, and sunny protagonist. claire e. gross

Grades 2-4
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