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Because They Marched: The People’s Campaign for Voting Rights That Changed America

By: Russell Freedman

March 21, 1965: “This is a great day to be alive,” exclaimed Sister Mary Leoline, one of thousands marching fifty-four miles from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, to support the Voting Rights Act. Time line. Source notes. Selected bibliography. Index. Black-and-white photographs.

ISBN: 9780823429219

JLG Release: Dec 2014


Sensitive Areas: Language: Racial or Ethnic Epithet/Slur, Violence: Mild Violence
Topics: Selma to Montgomery Rights March, 1965 , Selma, Alabama , Race relations , African Americans , Civil rights , Suffrage , Twentieth-century U ,S , history , Civil rights movement

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Awards & Honors

Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2014, Middle-Grade Books; Booklist Editors’ Choice 2014, Nonfiction, Older Readers; Booklist Lasting Connections 2014, Social Studies; Center for the Study of Multicultural Children’s Literature, Best Multicultural Books of 2014; Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People - 2015, Third to Fifth Grade; Booklist Top 10 Multicultural Nonfiction for Youth, 2015; ALA Notable Books for Children 2015, Older Readers

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Booklist*, The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal

School Library Journal

With the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 approaching, this book captures a significant struggle in history, focusing on the two years leading up to President Lyndon Johnson signing the act into law. Freedman gives readers the necessary context they need to understand the Civil Rights Movement and the importance of Selma, Alabama. With the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 approaching, this book captures a significant struggle in history, focusing on the two years leading up to President Lyndon Johnson signing the act into law. Freedman gives readers the necessary context they need to understand the Civil Rights Movement and the importance of Selma, Alabama. Through short chapters, skilled, fluid writing, powerful photographs, and firsthand accounts of the clash between black and white Americans, Freedman has crafted an account of a crucial time in history; readers will easily be able to imagine that a grandfather or great-grandfather is telling this story. This well-organized work is ideal for research projects. Like Ann Bausum’s Freedom Riders: John Lewis and Jim Zwerg on the Front Lines of the Civil Rights Movement (National Geographic, 2013), this is a strong, engaging look at the subject. A first choice for libraries looking for titles on the Civil Rights Movement.—Jeni Tahaney, Duncanville High School Library, TX

Horn Book

With characteristically clear prose sprinkled liberally with primary source quotes and carefully selected photographs, Freedman documents the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March that featured the horrific Bloody Sunday confrontation between the marchers and the Alabama state troopers. Captured on television footage by all the major networks, these event With characteristically clear prose sprinkled liberally with primary source quotes and carefully selected photographs, Freedman documents the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March that featured the horrific Bloody Sunday confrontation between the marchers and the Alabama state troopers. Captured on television footage by all the major networks, these events convinced the nation—and Congress—that something finally had to be done. That something turned out to be the Voting Rights Act of 1965, “the crowning achievement of the civil rights movement.” Freedman’s introduction is particularly effective because it focuses on the teachers’ march to the courthouse to register as a major trigger for the movement: “For the first time, a recognized professional group from Selma’s black community had carried out an organized protest.” If the book is not quite as visually striking as its notable predecessor, Elizabeth Partridge’s Marching for Freedom (rev. 11/09), nor as invested in the youth participation, its later publication date allows the book to touch on the controversial 2013 Supreme Court decision that struck down key provisions of the Voting Rights Act. A timeline, source notes, selected bibliography, and an index are appended. jonathan hunt

Book Details

ISBN

9780823429219

First Release

December 2014

Genre

Nonfic

Dewey Classification

323.1196/073076145

Trim Size

11" x 8 1/2"

Page Count

96

Accelerated Reader

Level 7.6; Points: 3;

Scholastic Reading Counts

Level 11.6; Points: 6;

Lexile

Level 1160L

Format

Print Book

Edition

Hardcover edition

Publisher

Holiday House

Potentially Sensitive Areas

Language: Racial or Ethnic Epithet/Slur, Violence: Mild Violence

Topics

Selma to Montgomery Rights March, 1965, Selma, Alabama, Race relations, African Americans, Civil rights, Suffrage, Twentieth-century U,S, history, Civil rights movement,

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