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Baby Monkey, Private Eye



by
Brian Selznick ,David Serlin
illustrated by
Brian Selznick

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Scholastic
Imprint
Scholastic
ISBN
9781338180619

Awards and Honors
2019 Gryphon Award Winner
ALSC Notable Children's Books - 2019
MRLS Cream of the Crop - 2019
Capitol Choices: Noteworthy Books for Children and Teens - 2019
Booklist Editors’ Choice: Books for Youth - 2018
Kirkus Best Books, Middle-Grade - 2018
BCCB Blue Ribbons - 2018
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$15.30   $12.75
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QTY
Out of stock

Baby Monkey's adventures come to life in an exciting blend of picture book, beginning reader, and graphic novel. Illustration key. Index. Bibliography. Two-color illustrations created in pencil.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

192

Trim Size

7 3/4" x 5 1/4"

Dewey

E

AR

1.4: points 0.5

Lexile

210L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Apr 2018

Book Genres


Topics

Monkeys. Private investigators. Detectives. Humorous stories. Early readers.

Standard MARC Records

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Cover Art

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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books*, Booklist*, The Horn Book Magazine*, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Selznick and Serlin take the easy reader format to new creative heights. Baby Monkey may be a baby (and a monkey) but he has a full-time job as a private eye. Baby Monkey solves five cases (one for each chapter) by looking carefully for visual clues. Full-page illustrations facing single, simple, and often repetitive sentences in an oversized typeface make this ideal for emerging readers. The sharp pacing and charming humor also make it an excellent read-aloud choice. Selznick’s signature black-and-white drawings—his noir-like style here played up to full effect—invite readers to linger and look carefully. With each case, the framed paintings and various bric-a-brac decorating Baby Monkey’s well-appointed office changes. Hidden clues and jokes abound, as in “The Case of the Missing Spaceship,” wherein the opening two-page spread shows a framed poster of A Trip to the Moon (a hat tip to devoted Selznick fans), an image of Apollo 13, a portrait of Galileo Galilei, and a bust of John F. Kennedy. Will most of these references sail over the heads of the intended audience? Perhaps. But the story works just as well without them, and Selznick and Serlin take pains to make sure young readers have enough information to look them up if they are so inclined; the “Key to Baby Monkey’s Office” in the back matter lists each visual reference by chapter/case. A running gag about Baby Monkey forgetting to wear—and struggling to put on—pants will have readers cracking up. In the very last case, the primate private eye jumps into the loving arms of his mom and takes a well-earned nap. VERDICT A delightful easy reader that is as funny as it is elegant. This will be enjoyed equally by youngsters and their grown-ups.—Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
Selznick, who won the 2008 Caldecott Medal for his 534-page picture book/ novel hybrid The Invention of Hugo Cabret (rev. 3/07), here presents with coauthor and husband Serlin an almost-two-hundred-page . . . easy reader/film-noir homage. In five chapters, diminutive gumshoe Baby Monkey solves a series of cases (“Chapter One: The Case of the Missing Jewels!” “Chapter Two: The Case of the Missing Pizza!”). Each follows a predictable pattern, with occasional small variation: Baby Monkey is waiting in his office (think The Maltese Falcon); a client arrives; Baby Monkey looks for clues and takes notes; he has a snack . . . then puts on his pants, the last a complicated procedure. After some perfectly timed page-turns showing the getting-dressed process, “Now Baby Monkey is ready!” He leaves his office, solves the case, and captures the culprit: “Hooray for Baby Monkey!” New readers will delight in the details in both the brief text and the shadowy, noirish black-and-white illustrations with pops of red. Baby Monkey looks like a cute little monkey, albeit with anthropomorphized facial expressions; and the spot-on slapstick pacing of the putting-on-pants sequences will have viewers giggling for days. The decorations and books in Baby Monkey’s office change thematically (and sophisticatedly) with each case—see the appended key (e.g., “Baby from Madame Roulin and Her Baby, 1888 painting by Vincent van Gogh, [1853–1890]”). Also appended with an index (“Anderson, Marian: 23, 47”) and a totally-made-up-but-plausible-sounding bibliography of Baby Monkey’s books (“Zanzibar, Jeanine. Healthy Snacks for Growing Primates. Madison, WI: Harlow Books, 1994”). elissa gershowitz

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
Selznick and Serlin take the easy reader format to new creative heights. Baby Monkey may be a baby (and a monkey) but he has a full-time job as a private eye. Baby Monkey solves five cases (one for each chapter) by looking carefully for visual clues. Full-page illustrations facing single, simple, and often repetitive sentences in an oversized typeface make this ideal for emerging readers. The sharp pacing and charming humor also make it an excellent read-aloud choice. Selznick’s signature black-and-white drawings—his noir-like style here played up to full effect—invite readers to linger and look carefully. With each case, the framed paintings and various bric-a-brac decorating Baby Monkey’s well-appointed office changes. Hidden clues and jokes abound, as in “The Case of the Missing Spaceship,” wherein the opening two-page spread shows a framed poster of A Trip to the Moon (a hat tip to devoted Selznick fans), an image of Apollo 13, a portrait of Galileo Galilei, and a bust of John F. Kennedy. Will most of these references sail over the heads of the intended audience? Perhaps. But the story works just as well without them, and Selznick and Serlin take pains to make sure young readers have enough information to look them up if they are so inclined; the “Key to Baby Monkey’s Office” in the back matter lists each visual reference by chapter/case. A running gag about Baby Monkey forgetting to wear—and struggling to put on—pants will have readers cracking up. In the very last case, the primate private eye jumps into the loving arms of his mom and takes a well-earned nap. VERDICT A delightful easy reader that is as funny as it is elegant. This will be enjoyed equally by youngsters and their grown-ups.—Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
Selznick, who won the 2008 Caldecott Medal for his 534-page picture book/ novel hybrid The Invention of Hugo Cabret (rev. 3/07), here presents with coauthor and husband Serlin an almost-two-hundred-page . . . easy reader/film-noir homage. In five chapters, diminutive gumshoe Baby Monkey solves a series of cases (“Chapter One: The Case of the Missing Jewels!” “Chapter Two: The Case of the Missing Pizza!”). Each follows a predictable pattern, with occasional small variation: Baby Monkey is waiting in his office (think The Maltese Falcon); a client arrives; Baby Monkey looks for clues and takes notes; he has a snack . . . then puts on his pants, the last a complicated procedure. After some perfectly timed page-turns showing the getting-dressed process, “Now Baby Monkey is ready!” He leaves his office, solves the case, and captures the culprit: “Hooray for Baby Monkey!” New readers will delight in the details in both the brief text and the shadowy, noirish black-and-white illustrations with pops of red. Baby Monkey looks like a cute little monkey, albeit with anthropomorphized facial expressions; and the spot-on slapstick pacing of the putting-on-pants sequences will have viewers giggling for days. The decorations and books in Baby Monkey’s office change thematically (and sophisticatedly) with each case—see the appended key (e.g., “Baby from Madame Roulin and Her Baby, 1888 painting by Vincent van Gogh, [1853–1890]”). Also appended with an index (“Anderson, Marian: 23, 47”) and a totally-made-up-but-plausible-sounding bibliography of Baby Monkey’s books (“Zanzibar, Jeanine. Healthy Snacks for Growing Primates. Madison, WI: Harlow Books, 1994”). elissa gershowitz

Grades K-1
Emergent Readers Plus
For Grades K-1

Engaging short texts and large type for children who are beginning to read. Books feature familiar vocabulary and natural repetition as well as playful hooks to pull in readers. With artwork and layout designed to enhance comprehension, these books foster pleasurable and successful early reading experience.

14 books per Year
$189.00 per Year
Interests
Beginning Readers,ESL,Fiction,Picture Books,Storytime/Read Alouds
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Grades K-1
Emergent Readers Plus
14 books per Year
$189.00 per Year

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