Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Locomotive



by
Brian Floca

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Simon & Schuster
Imprint
Atheneum
ISBN
9781416994152

Awards and Honors
Booklist 2013 Lasting Connections, Science; Kirkus Reviews Best Children’s Books of 2013; SLJs Best Books of 2013, Nonfiction; Booklist Editor’s Choice: Books for Youth, 2013, Nonfiction; 2014 NCTE Orbis Pictus Award Honor Book; 2014 Caldecott Medal Winner; 2014 Robert F. Sibert Medal Honor Book; Horn Book Fanfare, Best Books of 2013, Nonfiction; ALA 2014 Notable Children’s Books, Younger Readers; 2013 Cybils Awards, Nonfiction: Elementary and Middle Grade, Finalist; New York Times 10 Best Illustrated Children’s Books of 2013; 2014 IRA Teachers’ Choices, Intermediate Readers; William Allen White Children#8217;s Book Awards 2015–2016 Master List
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$21.59   $17.99
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

Hear the hiss of the steam? It is the summer of 1869, and a family is riding west from Omaha, Nebraska, on America’s first transcontinental railroad. Author’s note about the locomotive. Sources. Cross-section diagram of a locomotive. Full-color illustrations rendered in watercolor, ink, acrylic, and gouache.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

64

Trim Size

10 1/2" x 11 3/4"

Dewey

385.0973

AR

4.7: points 0.5

Lexile

640L

Genre

Nonfic

Scholastic Reading Counts

3

JLG Release

Oct 2013

Book Genres


Topics

Locomotives. Nineteenth-century U.S. history. Westward expansion. Transcontinental railroad. Railroads.

Standard MARC Records

Download Standard MARC Records

Cover Art

Download Cover Art

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books*, Booklist*, The Horn Book Magazine*, Kirkus Reviews*, Publishers Weekly*, School Library Journal*

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
It all started with “a new road of rails/made for people to ride” where “covered wagons used to crawl.” Almost 150 years ago—just after the Civil War—the completion of the transcontinental railway radically changed both this country’s landscape and the opportunities of its people. The book traces the advent of cross-country train travel, focusing on an early trip from Omaha to Sacramento. As in Moonshot (2009) and Lightship (2007, both S & S), Floca proves himself masterful with words, art, and ideas. The book’s large format offers space for a robust story in a hefty package of information. Set in well-paced blank verse, the text begins with a quick sketch of “how this road was built” and moves abruptly to the passengers on the platform and the approaching train. The author smoothly integrates descriptions of the structure and mechanics of the locomotive, tasks of crew members, passing landscapes, and experiences of passengers. Simply sketched people and backgrounds, striking views of the locomotive, and broad scenes of unpopulated terrain are framed in small vignettes or sweep across the page. Though a bit technical in explaining engine parts, the travelogue scheme will read aloud nicely and also offers absorbing details for leisurely personal reading. Substantial introductory and concluding sections serve older readers. There’s also a detailed explanation of the author’s efforts and sources in exploring his subject. Train buffs and history fans of many ages will find much to savor in this gorgeously rendered and intelligent effort.—Margaret Bush, Simmons College, Boston

SLJ’s Best Books December 2013, Nonfiction
A family’s 1869 journey from Omaha to Sacramento aboard the just-completed transcontinental railroad provides a compelling and fact-packed look at history. A strapping narrative powered by bell-clanging onomatopoeia coalesces with dynamic artwork to portray the engine’s workings, the majesty of the passing terrain, and the full-steam-ahead expansion of a young nation.

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
Talk about a youth librarian’s dream come true: a big new book about those ever-popular trains from a bona fide picture-book-nonfiction all-star. Striking cinematic endpapers lay the groundwork, describing the creation of the Transcontinental Railroad in the 1860s. Then, in a sort of historical-fiction-meets-travelogue narrative, Floca zeroes in on one family’s journey from Omaha to San Francisco. Floca excels at juxtaposing sweeping panoramas with intimate, slice-of-life moments: here a widescreen shot of the train chugging across the Great Plains; later a vignette at a “dollar for dinner” hash house (“If the chicken tastes like prairie dog, don’t ask why,” cautions the narrator). Varied font sizes and styles on the large pages beautifully capture the onomatopoeia (“Hisssssssss”; “huff huff huff”; “chug-chug chug-chug chug-chug”) of the train and the feel of the Old West. One spread finds the train precariously crossing a trestle (“The train is so heavy, the bridge is so narrow, and rickety rickety rickety!”); the concluding ricketys are displayed in an appropriately jarring shadowed font alongside a picture of passengers shaking—and praying—in their seats. Luckily, our family makes it safely to its destination: “the country’s far corners have been pulled together…thanks to the locomotive.” An author’s note and thorough discussion of the sources used are included, and don’t miss the back endpapers—the steam power diagram would make David Macaulay proud. SAM BLOOM

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

[STARRED REVIEW]
It all started with “a new road of rails/made for people to ride” where “covered wagons used to crawl.” Almost 150 years ago—just after the Civil War—the completion of the transcontinental railway radically changed both this country’s landscape and the opportunities of its people. The book traces the advent of cross-country train travel, focusing on an early trip from Omaha to Sacramento. As in Moonshot (2009) and Lightship (2007, both S & S), Floca proves himself masterful with words, art, and ideas. The book’s large format offers space for a robust story in a hefty package of information. Set in well-paced blank verse, the text begins with a quick sketch of “how this road was built” and moves abruptly to the passengers on the platform and the approaching train. The author smoothly integrates descriptions of the structure and mechanics of the locomotive, tasks of crew members, passing landscapes, and experiences of passengers. Simply sketched people and backgrounds, striking views of the locomotive, and broad scenes of unpopulated terrain are framed in small vignettes or sweep across the page. Though a bit technical in explaining engine parts, the travelogue scheme will read aloud nicely and also offers absorbing details for leisurely personal reading. Substantial introductory and concluding sections serve older readers. There’s also a detailed explanation of the author’s efforts and sources in exploring his subject. Train buffs and history fans of many ages will find much to savor in this gorgeously rendered and intelligent effort.—Margaret Bush, Simmons College, Boston

SLJ’s Best Books December 2013, Nonfiction
A family’s 1869 journey from Omaha to Sacramento aboard the just-completed transcontinental railroad provides a compelling and fact-packed look at history. A strapping narrative powered by bell-clanging onomatopoeia coalesces with dynamic artwork to portray the engine’s workings, the majesty of the passing terrain, and the full-steam-ahead expansion of a young nation.

Horn Book

[STARRED REVIEW]
Talk about a youth librarian’s dream come true: a big new book about those ever-popular trains from a bona fide picture-book-nonfiction all-star. Striking cinematic endpapers lay the groundwork, describing the creation of the Transcontinental Railroad in the 1860s. Then, in a sort of historical-fiction-meets-travelogue narrative, Floca zeroes in on one family’s journey from Omaha to San Francisco. Floca excels at juxtaposing sweeping panoramas with intimate, slice-of-life moments: here a widescreen shot of the train chugging across the Great Plains; later a vignette at a “dollar for dinner” hash house (“If the chicken tastes like prairie dog, don’t ask why,” cautions the narrator). Varied font sizes and styles on the large pages beautifully capture the onomatopoeia (“Hisssssssss”; “huff huff huff”; “chug-chug chug-chug chug-chug”) of the train and the feel of the Old West. One spread finds the train precariously crossing a trestle (“The train is so heavy, the bridge is so narrow, and rickety rickety rickety!”); the concluding ricketys are displayed in an appropriately jarring shadowed font alongside a picture of passengers shaking—and praying—in their seats. Luckily, our family makes it safely to its destination: “the country’s far corners have been pulled together…thanks to the locomotive.” An author’s note and thorough discussion of the sources used are included, and don’t miss the back endpapers—the steam power diagram would make David Macaulay proud. SAM BLOOM

Grades 2-6
Nonfiction Elementary Plus
For Grades 2-6

A world of discovery awaits in this 12 book category. Elementary readers eager to know more about the world around them will learn much from diving into these nonfiction titles covering a diverse range of topics. A sure way to satisfy inquisitive minds.

14 books per Year
$245.70 per Year
Interests
Biographies,Diversity,Nonfiction,Reluctant Readers,Science/STEAM
Like this book?
Get more like this every month.
LEARN MORE
Grades 2-6
Nonfiction Elementary Plus
14 books per Year
$245.70 per Year

Other Recommended Titles From Nonfiction Elementary Plus

Yummy

by Victoria Grace Elliott

Nonfiction Elementary Plus

December 2021

Nonfiction Elementary Plus

November 2021

Nonfiction Elementary Plus

October 2021

Nonfiction Elementary Plus

October 2021
Copyright © 2017 Magento, Inc. All rights reserved.