Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

The Quickest Kid in Clarksville



by
Pat Zietlow Miller
illustrated by
Frank Morrison

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Chronicle Books
Imprint
Chronicle
ISBN
9781452129365

Awards and Honors
Booklist 2016 Top 10 Books for Youth, Sports
ALA Notable Books for Children Nominee–Summer 2016, Picture Books
CBC Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People 2017, K–2
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$12.00   $7.50
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY
Out of stock

1960: Her shoes may have holes, but Alta knows she’s Clarksville, Tennessee’s next Wilma Rudolph. But Charmaine, with “brand-new, only-been-worn-by-her” sneakers, insists she’s faster. Who will win a race down the block? Author’s note. Full-color watercolor illustrations.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

40

AR

2.9: points 0.5

Lexile

490L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

1

JLG Release

Mar 2016

Book Genres


Topics

Wilma Rudolph (1940-1994). African American girls. Clarksville, Tennessee. Role models. Parades. Segregation. Twentieth-century history. Running.

Standard MARC Records

Download Standard MARC Records

Cover Art

Download Cover Art

Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, The Horn Book Magazine, The Horn Book Guide^, Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal

Junior Library Guild

  • Using Olympic runner Wilma Rudolph’s 1960 homecoming parade as a backdrop, the story is a lively look at the rivalry between two of Wilma’s young fans—narrator Alta and Charmaine.
  • The girls’ initial interaction—a chance meeting that turns into a race—feels like an authentic childhood competition: “Charmaine’s face tightens. ‘Reckon I’m faster than anyone.’ I puff up like a spitting cat. She wishes she were Wilma. But I’m the real deal. I point to the mailbox. ‘There and back.’” It is gratifying that Alta and Charmaine later join forces—running a relay with a “Run Wilma Run” banner—to get Wilma’s attention at the parade.
  • Frank Morrison’s vibrant illustrations are expressive and charming. Elongated limbs and exaggerated movements put an emphasis on the girls’ athleticism.
  • An author’s note provides further information about Wilma Rudolph’s life and accomplishments, as well as segregation in the South. Reading about Wilma’s insistence that her homecoming parade be integrated is inspiring: “Wilma’s celebrations were the first major events for blacks and whites in Clarksville history.”

School Library Journal

A story about teamwork and perseverance, this homage to the great Wilma Rudolph takes place in 1960 at about the time of the homecoming parade for the Olympian, which occurred in Clarksville, TN—the first integrated event in that town. Young Alta idolizes the great runner and practices her own gait using a rhythmic chant: “Wil-ma Ru-dolph.” When she meets a girl with a competitive spirit and brand-new sneakers, Alta has to remind herself that Wilma Rudolph overcame obstacles greater than worn-out shoes. On the day of the parade, a banner that Alta is making is too bulky for one person to carry the whole way, and the new girl, Charmaine, offers a solution—the girls and their friends run an Olympic-style relay to get the banner to the parade site on time. Morrison’s full-bleed watercolor illustrations give an effective sense of time and place and render the characters movement well. An author’s note provides brief biographical material emphasizing Rudolph’s athletic achievements and her role in integrating her hometown. VERDICT A solid addition for large collections.—Lisa Lehmuller, Paul Cuffee Maritime Charter School, Providence, RI

Horn Book

Miller introduces us to Alta, the self-proclaimed “quickest kid in Clarksville”—the same town that her shero, Wilma Rudolph, is from. As Alta daydreams about an upcoming parade celebrating the 1960 Olympic track star, she is confronted by Charmaine, a new girl with shiny new shoes (shoes “like Wilma’s”) who has the audacity to try to claim Alta’s title. Their first few races against each other end in a draw, and their interactions are less than cordial. Charmaine taunts Alta about her old shoes, and in response Alta admits, “My toe hits a rock. . . . That rock hits Charmaine.” On the day of the parade, however, the girls must decide whether or not they can stop the angry competition, and they begin to collaborate. Miller has penned an engaging, lively story. Of particular note is Alta’s way of keeping pace as she runs—her repeated refrain of “Wil-ma Ru-dolph. Wil-ma Ru-dolph” echoes the story’s steady rhythm. Illustrator Morrison (Little Melba and Her Big Trombone, rev. 11/14) has added a softness to his style with the use of watercolors; however, his familiar use of elongated limbs is on full display in the racing scenes between Alta and Charmaine. The remarkable fact that, in the Jim Crow South, Wilma Rudolph insisted that the celebrations in her honor be integrated is hinted at in the text, in Alta’s fragmented sentences describing the parade (“Black faces. And white ones”); an author’s note provides fuller mention (“Wilma’s celebrations were the first major events for blacks and whites in Clarksville history”) as well as further information about Rudolph’s life and achievements. eboni njoku

Praise & Reviews

Junior Library Guild

  • Using Olympic runner Wilma Rudolph’s 1960 homecoming parade as a backdrop, the story is a lively look at the rivalry between two of Wilma’s young fans—narrator Alta and Charmaine.
  • The girls’ initial interaction—a chance meeting that turns into a race—feels like an authentic childhood competition: “Charmaine’s face tightens. ‘Reckon I’m faster than anyone.’ I puff up like a spitting cat. She wishes she were Wilma. But I’m the real deal. I point to the mailbox. ‘There and back.’” It is gratifying that Alta and Charmaine later join forces—running a relay with a “Run Wilma Run” banner—to get Wilma’s attention at the parade.
  • Frank Morrison’s vibrant illustrations are expressive and charming. Elongated limbs and exaggerated movements put an emphasis on the girls’ athleticism.
  • An author’s note provides further information about Wilma Rudolph’s life and accomplishments, as well as segregation in the South. Reading about Wilma’s insistence that her homecoming parade be integrated is inspiring: “Wilma’s celebrations were the first major events for blacks and whites in Clarksville history.”

School Library Journal

A story about teamwork and perseverance, this homage to the great Wilma Rudolph takes place in 1960 at about the time of the homecoming parade for the Olympian, which occurred in Clarksville, TN—the first integrated event in that town. Young Alta idolizes the great runner and practices her own gait using a rhythmic chant: “Wil-ma Ru-dolph.” When she meets a girl with a competitive spirit and brand-new sneakers, Alta has to remind herself that Wilma Rudolph overcame obstacles greater than worn-out shoes. On the day of the parade, a banner that Alta is making is too bulky for one person to carry the whole way, and the new girl, Charmaine, offers a solution—the girls and their friends run an Olympic-style relay to get the banner to the parade site on time. Morrison’s full-bleed watercolor illustrations give an effective sense of time and place and render the characters movement well. An author’s note provides brief biographical material emphasizing Rudolph’s athletic achievements and her role in integrating her hometown. VERDICT A solid addition for large collections.—Lisa Lehmuller, Paul Cuffee Maritime Charter School, Providence, RI

Horn Book

Miller introduces us to Alta, the self-proclaimed “quickest kid in Clarksville”—the same town that her shero, Wilma Rudolph, is from. As Alta daydreams about an upcoming parade celebrating the 1960 Olympic track star, she is confronted by Charmaine, a new girl with shiny new shoes (shoes “like Wilma’s”) who has the audacity to try to claim Alta’s title. Their first few races against each other end in a draw, and their interactions are less than cordial. Charmaine taunts Alta about her old shoes, and in response Alta admits, “My toe hits a rock. . . . That rock hits Charmaine.” On the day of the parade, however, the girls must decide whether or not they can stop the angry competition, and they begin to collaborate. Miller has penned an engaging, lively story. Of particular note is Alta’s way of keeping pace as she runs—her repeated refrain of “Wil-ma Ru-dolph. Wil-ma Ru-dolph” echoes the story’s steady rhythm. Illustrator Morrison (Little Melba and Her Big Trombone, rev. 11/14) has added a softness to his style with the use of watercolors; however, his familiar use of elongated limbs is on full display in the racing scenes between Alta and Charmaine. The remarkable fact that, in the Jim Crow South, Wilma Rudolph insisted that the celebrations in her honor be integrated is hinted at in the text, in Alta’s fragmented sentences describing the parade (“Black faces. And white ones”); an author’s note provides fuller mention (“Wilma’s celebrations were the first major events for blacks and whites in Clarksville history”) as well as further information about Rudolph’s life and achievements. eboni njoku

Grades 2-6
Sports Elementary Plus
For Grades 2-6

Welcome to an exciting world of sports-themed fiction and nonfiction sure to win over your elementary sports fans. Have a few reluctant readers? These action-packed titles are a great way to get them in the game. And with 12 books per year, sports fans will be entertained all year long.

14 books per Year
$228.20 per Year
Interests
Biographies,Chapter Books,Fiction,Nonfiction,Positive Messages,Reluctant Readers,Sports
Like this book?
Get more like this every month.
LEARN MORE
Grades 2-6
Sports Elementary Plus
14 books per Year
$228.20 per Year

Other Recommended Titles From Sports Elementary Plus

Hoop Kings 2: New Royalty

by Charles R. Smith Jr.

Sports Elementary Plus

November 2021

The Fifth Quarter

by Mike Dawson

Sports Elementary Plus

October 2021

Sarah and the Big Wave

by Bonnie Tsui

Sports Elementary Plus

October 2021

Sports Elementary Plus

September 2021
Copyright © 2017 Magento, Inc. All rights reserved.