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American as Paneer Pie



by
Supriya Kelkar

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Simon & Schuster
Imprint
Aladdin
ISBN
9781534439382
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Discrimination: Racial Insensitivity/Racism , Language: Mild Language , Crime: Hate Crimes , Language: Infrequent Use
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As the only Indian American kid in her small town, Lekha Divekar feels like she has two versions of herself: Home Lekha, who loves watching Bollywood movies and eating Indian food, and School Lekha, who pins her hair over her bindi birthmark and avoids confrontation at all costs, especially when someone teases her for being Indian.

When a girl Lekha’s age moves in across the street, Lekha is excited to hear that her name is Avantika and she’s Desi, too! Finally, there will be someone else around who gets it. But as soon as Avantika speaks, Lekha realizes she has an accent. She’s new to this country, and not at all like Lekha.

To Lekha’s surprise, Avantika does not feel the same way as Lekha about having two separate lives or about the bullying at school. Avantika doesn’t take the bullying quietly. And she proudly displays her culture no matter where she is: at home or at school.

When a racist incident rocks Lekha’s community, Lekha realizes she must make a choice: continue to remain silent or find her voice before it’s too late.

Paneer pie recipe.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
Discrimination: Racial Insensitivity/Racism , Language: Mild Language , Crime: Hate Crimes , Language: Infrequent Use

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

320

Trim Size

8 3/10" x 5 1/2"

Dewey

F

AR

5.4: points 9

Lexile

840L

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Oct 2020

Book Genres

Realistic Fiction

Topics

Immigrants. East Indian Americans. Prejudices. Bullying. Self-confidence. Hate crimes. Middle schools.


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Praise & Reviews

Starred or favorable reviews have been received from these periodicals:

School Library Journal

School Library Journal

Kelkar depicts the life of Lehka, an 11-year-old Indian American girl ¬navigating two worlds with heart and compassion. As “Home Lehka,” she lives with her parents in a suburb of Detroit, where her family is the only Indian American family in the neighborhood. Her best friend and neighbor, Noah, is appreciative of Lehka’s culture and the flavorful food her family enjoys. But as “School Lehka,” her voice is absent. She allows teachers and students to mispronounce her name and to make disrespectful comments about her heritage. When a new Indian American family—with a daughter Lehka’s age—moves to her neighborhood, she is thrilled, assuming that her new friend Avantika will also prefer to keep her two identities separate. But Avantika confidently talks about her family and traditions, even at school, and Lehka is simultaneously inspired and confused. As she begins taking tentative steps toward speaking up about what matters to her, a classroom assignment to write an opinion piece becomes the catalyst for embracing her identity. Secondary plots and minor characters enrich the story of a girl striving to find her voice, especially in scenes involving Lehka’s swim team and a touching moment in which Lehka speaks out about what it means to be American. Filled with references to Lehka’s rich culture, this title is a tender depiction of a young girl navigating prejudice and finding ways to be her whole self in the process.

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Kelkar depicts the life of Lehka, an 11-year-old Indian American girl ¬navigating two worlds with heart and compassion. As “Home Lehka,” she lives with her parents in a suburb of Detroit, where her family is the only Indian American family in the neighborhood. Her best friend and neighbor, Noah, is appreciative of Lehka’s culture and the flavorful food her family enjoys. But as “School Lehka,” her voice is absent. She allows teachers and students to mispronounce her name and to make disrespectful comments about her heritage. When a new Indian American family—with a daughter Lehka’s age—moves to her neighborhood, she is thrilled, assuming that her new friend Avantika will also prefer to keep her two identities separate. But Avantika confidently talks about her family and traditions, even at school, and Lehka is simultaneously inspired and confused. As she begins taking tentative steps toward speaking up about what matters to her, a classroom assignment to write an opinion piece becomes the catalyst for embracing her identity. Secondary plots and minor characters enrich the story of a girl striving to find her voice, especially in scenes involving Lehka’s swim team and a touching moment in which Lehka speaks out about what it means to be American. Filled with references to Lehka’s rich culture, this title is a tender depiction of a young girl navigating prejudice and finding ways to be her whole self in the process.

Grades 5-8
Realistic Fiction Middle Plus
For Grades 5-8

Stories with strong, relatable characters that portray believable contemporary or historical real-life experiences.

14 books per Year
$235.90 per Year
Interests
Chapter Books/Novels,Diversity,Fiction,History,Realistic Fiction
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Grades 5-8
Realistic Fiction Middle Plus
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$235.90 per Year

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