Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

A Goat Called Willow: Jasmine Green Rescues


Series
Jasmine Green Rescues

by
Helen Peters
illustrated by
Ellie Snowdon

Edition
Hardcover edition
Publisher
Candlewick
Imprint
Walker
ISBN
9781536210293
POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None
$18.30   $15.25
SEE MEMBER PRICE
QTY

After Jasmine saves a baby goat from a dire fate, its athletic talents lead to comical mischief—and some difficult decisions.

On a trip to the local fair, Jasmine and her best friend, Tom, discover an orphaned baby goat for sale. The owner says he cannot raise her, so this seems like the perfect use for their spending money. But getting the goat home without Jasmine’s parents realizing is nearly impossible, and so is keeping her inside a pen—Willow loves to jump! Jasmine decides to enter the goat in an agility contest (sheepdogs, move over) to show Mom and Dad just how wonderful Willow is. Will Jasmine’s parents agree to keep the little escape artist? Or is there a better home for Willow than Oak Tree Farm? In a lighthearted adventure, author Helen Peters and illustrator Ellie Snowdon invite readers on a laugh-out-loud romp through the ups and downs of animal caretaking.“A Q&A with Jasmine Green.” Preview of A Donkey Called Mistletoe. Black-and-white illustrations were done in pencil with a digital wash overlay.

POTENTIALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
None

Details

Format

Print

Page Count

144

Trim Size

7 3/5" x 5"

Dewey

F

AR

0: points 0

Genre

Fiction

Scholastic Reading Counts

0

JLG Release

Jul 2021

Book Genres

Chapter Book

Topics

Goats, Friends, Farms and farm life, Animal rescue, Family life, Animals, Veterinarians, Animal training

Standard MARC Records

Download Standard MARC Records

Cover Art

Download Cover Art

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 2-5–Peters provides insight into rearing animals both wild and domestic in this enjoyable series. In A Goat Called Willow, budding animal rescuers Jasmine and Tom buy a kid at an agricultural fair. Farmer Evans says the goat will be destroyed if no one takes her. The friends secretly clean out a chicken run in the corner of the sheep field on Jasmine’s family farm, but the mischievous kid escapes from the pen and turns up at the children’s school, eats the custodian’s flowers, and climbs a tree. The secret is out, and Jasmine’s parents say the goat has to go. Jasmine plans to win them over by secretly entering Willow in an agility class for pets at the town festival, and Manu, Jasmine’s little brother, trains the animal on a homemade obstacle course. But when Willow creates mayhem at the festival, Jasmine fears for the future of her little charge. In A Lamb Called Lucky, it’s lambing season on the farm, and when Jasmine finds an orphaned lamb, she knows just what to do. The baby needs colostrum, the first milk that contains vital antibodies. She calls the lamb Lucky, a name that proves apt in more ways than one. When a gang of sheep rustlers steal the family herd, Jasmine and her father attempt to track them down. Once again, Jasmine and Tom demonstrate their commitment to rescued animals, forgoing pizza lunches and swimming pool excursions to nurture Lucky. Readers will get a sense of the responsibilities of life on a farm; Jasmine’s many tasks include teaching Sky, a rescued collie, to herd sheep. Peters turns up the cute factor in these delightful romps, though adults may feel uneasy with Jasmine and Tom’s level of deception among clueless grown-ups: Other adult characters agree not to reveal their secrets to Jasmine’s parents. Readers may also find the agency afforded Jasmine far-fetched, and some of the challenges the youngsters face feel implausibly resolved: The children have to fill out complicated paperwork for example, and get the animal appropriate vaccinations. Snowdon’s charming pencil illustrations have a nostalgic, pastoral feel. Jasmine, her mother, and her brother are shown with darker skin tones than her father and Tom. Jasmine’s mother has the surname Singh and is presumed to be Anglo-Indian. VERDICT A compelling series with a plucky, determined protagonist who follows her passion. Perfect for young animal lovers.–Sarah Webb, City and Country Sch. Lib., NY

Praise & Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 2-5–Peters provides insight into rearing animals both wild and domestic in this enjoyable series. In A Goat Called Willow, budding animal rescuers Jasmine and Tom buy a kid at an agricultural fair. Farmer Evans says the goat will be destroyed if no one takes her. The friends secretly clean out a chicken run in the corner of the sheep field on Jasmine’s family farm, but the mischievous kid escapes from the pen and turns up at the children’s school, eats the custodian’s flowers, and climbs a tree. The secret is out, and Jasmine’s parents say the goat has to go. Jasmine plans to win them over by secretly entering Willow in an agility class for pets at the town festival, and Manu, Jasmine’s little brother, trains the animal on a homemade obstacle course. But when Willow creates mayhem at the festival, Jasmine fears for the future of her little charge. In A Lamb Called Lucky, it’s lambing season on the farm, and when Jasmine finds an orphaned lamb, she knows just what to do. The baby needs colostrum, the first milk that contains vital antibodies. She calls the lamb Lucky, a name that proves apt in more ways than one. When a gang of sheep rustlers steal the family herd, Jasmine and her father attempt to track them down. Once again, Jasmine and Tom demonstrate their commitment to rescued animals, forgoing pizza lunches and swimming pool excursions to nurture Lucky. Readers will get a sense of the responsibilities of life on a farm; Jasmine’s many tasks include teaching Sky, a rescued collie, to herd sheep. Peters turns up the cute factor in these delightful romps, though adults may feel uneasy with Jasmine and Tom’s level of deception among clueless grown-ups: Other adult characters agree not to reveal their secrets to Jasmine’s parents. Readers may also find the agency afforded Jasmine far-fetched, and some of the challenges the youngsters face feel implausibly resolved: The children have to fill out complicated paperwork for example, and get the animal appropriate vaccinations. Snowdon’s charming pencil illustrations have a nostalgic, pastoral feel. Jasmine, her mother, and her brother are shown with darker skin tones than her father and Tom. Jasmine’s mother has the surname Singh and is presumed to be Anglo-Indian. VERDICT A compelling series with a plucky, determined protagonist who follows her passion. Perfect for young animal lovers.–Sarah Webb, City and Country Sch. Lib., NY

Grades 2-4
Independent Readers Plus
For Grades 2-4

Want even more? If 12 Independent books a year just aren't enough for your hungry readers, our I+ category has what you're looking for-providing 12 more titles at the very same reading level.

14 books per Year
$213.50 per Year
Interests
Chapter Books,Fiction,Reluctant Readers,Transitional Readers
Like this book?
Get more like this every month.
LEARN MORE
Grades 2-4
Independent Readers Plus
14 books per Year
$213.50 per Year

Other Recommended Titles From Independent Readers Plus

Independent Readers Plus

August 2021

Independent Readers Plus

July 2021

Independent Readers Plus

June 2021

Independent Readers Plus

May 2021
Copyright © 2017 Magento, Inc. All rights reserved.